Director: Richard Averbeck, PhD

Purpose and Nature of the Program

The Doctor of Philosophy (Theological Studies) Program is an advanced graduate degree primarily intended to prepare students for academic teaching and research in the fields of Church History/Historical Theology; New Testament Exegesis and Theology; Old Testament focus in Old Testament Hebrew, Literature, and Exegesis; Old Testament focus in Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages; and Systematic Theology. Students choose one of these fields as a major concentration in which they will take comprehensive examinations and write a dissertation. Students should also be theologically informed and, in particular, be able to relate their work to the field of Systematic Theology. This special emphasis is placed on Systematic Theology because of its central role in the development of doctrine and practice in the life of the church and because of its widespread neglect in theological education today.

Program Design

The PhD (Theological Studies) Program is designed on a four and a half-year, full-time model, usually consisting of two and a half years of residence coursework followed by an additional two years of comprehensive exams and dissertation research and writing. Completion of the program in four years assumes strong biblical and modern language skills and no entrance deficiencies. The current average program length is about 5.5 years, due primarily to language deficiencies and employment (financial) needs.

The THS program is 60 hours. Proficiency in the biblical languages and in German or French must be demonstrated prior to matriculation. Residence coursework includes the completion of seminar courses, departmental integrative courses and advanced electives, education and research methods courses, comprehensive examination, and dissertation proposal preparation. Additional hours of dissertation research follow the residence coursework. In instances where a student’s educational background has been limited to one theological tradition, the student may be advised or required to add a minimum of one term of residence work at another graduate school. Such residence work may also be required by the scope of proposed dissertation research.

While some participants may complete the required coursework within two years of matriculation, many will take longer than two years depending on their level of academic preparation, their aptitude, and the time they are able to devote to the demands of the program. A normal student course load for the program is 10 to 12 hours per semester. Full-time status in the program is defined as at least 9 hours per semester. In no case may a student exceed a course load of 16 hours of doctoral work per semester. Part-time students can be accommodated, although preference is given to full-time applicants. Prospective students must indicate their intent to be full or part time at the time of application. For additional information on the design of the program and its requirements, see the THS Handbook for Participants.

Instructional Modes

The Doctoral Seminar

The core of the formal course instruction is the seminar experience. The interaction of a doctoral seminar is much more than a discussion; it is a mode of learning. The assumption is that ideas are not a person’s own until they can be shaped into one’s own language and used in disciplined conversations. To facilitate dialogue, the instructor may provide for a common base of reading and reference by assigning preparatory work. Participants are expected to have read the assigned textbooks and other materials before the first class session.

Guided Research

Students may register for up to three (3) 9000-level Guided Research courses for a total of six (6) hours of credit before candidacy. These courses are noncatalog courses specifically designed to meet the academic interests of the participant.  The research course is intended to encourage research skills, competency in an area of research, and a relationship between students and their mentors. Most students will do this course under the guidance of the faculty member who will supervise the dissertation research.

Admission Requirements

Applicants for the PhD/THS program must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Have earned a Master of Divinity (MDiv) degree (or equivalent) from an accredited institution. Specifically this should include 18 hours in Old Testament and Biblical Hebrew, 14 hours in New Testament and Biblical Greek, 15 hours in Systematic Theology, and 7 hours in Church History. In special circumstances, the department of concentration may accept applicants who demonstrate particular qualities that justify their admission into the program without the MDiv degree.
  2. Have documented evidence of competency in biblical Greek and Hebrew.
  3. Present evidence of potential for original academic research at the doctoral level by submitting a sample of an exemplary research paper or thesis.
  4. Give evidence of intellectual competence in all previous accredited graduate studies.
  5. Have earned a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5 (on a 4.0 scale) in previous graduate studies.
  6. Submit a test score from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test. Applicants whose first language is not English must also submit scores less than two years old from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the Test of Written English (TWE), and the Test of Spoken English (TSE) in addition to the GRE.

Special Instructions for International Applicants

All international PhD/THS program students, including students from Canada, are now required to enter the United States with an F-1 visa, even if attending a single modular class. PhD/THS students are normally expected to enroll in a full-time residential status (i.e., living in Deerfield and registered for full-time attendance) and therefore must comply with the same visa requirements as residential master’s-level applicants (see Admissions section). Exceptions to this requirement must be cleared in advance with the program director and the International Students Office.

Admission Deficiencies

Applicants whose academic record does not include all the required prerequisites may in special circumstances be admitted to the program, but they will be asked to meet entrance deficiencies or demonstrate competence, at the Divinity School’s discretion.

Advanced Standing and Transfer Credit

A request for advanced standing on the basis of previous graduate work (e.g., a completed ThM degree) should be made known to the program director prior to the annual fall/spring review toward the end of the first year of study. The maximum number of advanced standing hours granted in the PhD/THS program is 10 semester hours; the actual number of hours granted may be fewer depending on the nature of the graduate program and the courses taken. The program director evaluates all past work and progress in the THS program and informs the Academic Doctoral Committee of the decision. Petitions made for advanced standing beyond what is normally allowed must be received by the Academic Doctoral Committee within the first two semesters after matriculation. Such petitions are exceptional and will be considered only in cases where previous course work has been completed in an academic doctoral program.

Transfer credit is not normally given for PhD doctoral study except as planned in advance in consultation with the program director.

Language Requirements

Proficiency in Biblical Hebrew and Greek as well as two modern research languages (usually German and French) are required for the THS program. Proficiency for all languages must be demonstrated by the end of the first year in the program. This may require some exams/courses to be taken in the semester prior to matriculation and/or in the first summer of the student’s program. The exams for any given language may be taken no more than two times, after which the participant shall meet with the Director. Language examinations are administered on a regular basis by the Academic Doctoral Office (ADO). Exam dates are available under the “Calendars” link at the ADO page in MyTIU.

Students whose biblical or research language skills are not at the PhD level will find it difficult to complete program coursework in two years, resulting in a longer period of doctoral studies. In no case will a student lacking proficiency in the required languages be eligible for a dissertation proposal, comprehensive exams, candidacy, or dissertation research.

Biblical Hebrew and Greek

The Hebrew and Greek Proficiency Exams evaluate proficiency in the biblical languages at a level similar to that of TEDS MDiv graduates. Participants whose biblical language skills are not at this level will find it difficult to complete program coursework in two years, resulting in a longer period of doctoral study. Please note: students are NOT permitted to take OT or NT seminars (and certain other courses where such proficiency is required) until they have proven their proficiency in Hebrew and Greek, respectively. This could delay the student’s course work plan/progress.

Participants must demonstrate advanced exegetical and reading skills in biblical Hebrew and Greek using one of the following options:

  1. Waiver: Students who, in the two years preceding PhD matriculation, have completed advanced exegesis courses in Hebrew or Greek in their MDiv or equivalent level of graduate studies (with a grade of B+ or higher) or who have completed a ThM (in OT or NT) may be deemed proficient. Such students should petition the Academic Doctoral Office for a waiver, including with the petition a course catalog description and an official transcript. The course must be equivalent to or exceed the content normally required of MDiv students in advanced exegesis courses at TEDS. (Such courses are beyond the core MDiv language sequence.) Waivers should be requested as soon as students accept their admission. Waiver requests from spring matriculants are due no later than December 15 (prior to matriculation); requests from fall matriculants are due no later than June15 (prior to matriculation). Those whose waivers are denied must pass the proficiency exam or complete a course (see options 2 and 3 below).
  2. Exam: Students may take an examination that includes translation, parsing, textual criticism, and theological, biblical, grammatical, and syntactical observations. Any student failing the exam is required to take a course (see option 3 below for instructions).
    1. Fall matriculants wishing to achieve proficiency in biblical languages via examination must take their exam(s) no later than the July test date offered by the Academic Doctoral Office in the summer prior to matriculation.
    2. Spring matriculants may take the exam prior to or during their first semester but not later than the July test date of their first summer in the program. It should be noted that NT/OT seminars may not be taken until proficiency is achieved.
  3. Course: Students may pass a remedial course: OT 6000 (with at least a B) and/or NT 5211 (with a B+ or higher; a B for students in the Historical Theology concentration). Such a course should be taken at the MDiv level but does not count toward the 60 hours required for the PhD program. Students taking NT 5211 should fill out a “THS Language Study Contract & Registration Form” (found on the ADO page in MyTIU). As a reminder, NT/OT seminars may not be taken until proficiency is achieved.
    1. Fall matriculants: OT 6000 must be taken in the TEDS summer session prior to matriculation. NT 5211 should be completed during the first fall semester in the program.
    2. Spring matriculants: OT 6000 must be taken in the first TEDS summer session of the program. NT 5211 may be taken in the first semester of the program but not later than the first fall semester of the program.

Modern (Research) Languages

Within the first year of study, participants are required to demonstrate reading proficiency in German and in a second research language. Proficiency is demonstrated with a proficiency exam or the passing of the final after taking a language course. Students may not take a proficiency exam without having formally studied the language for at least a year at the college or master’s level.

German

Proficiency in German must be demonstrated by passing the German proficiency exam before the beginning of the first fall semester in the program. Students may do this in one of two ways:

  1. Complete the German course sequence offered by the divinity school in the summer prior to the first fall semester, and pass the exam given at the end of the course; or, if the student needs to establish Hebrew proficiency by completing OT 6000 in the summer prior to the first fall semester, German should be taken in the following summer semester.
  2. Take the proficiency exam on one of the ADO’s pre-set language proficiency test dates. If the student fails the German proficiency exam, she or he must retake the exam at the first test date of the next semester (e.g., if a student fails the exam in the summer or fall, the retake must be done at the first test date in spring). The only exception to this retake rule is for students who elect to take the German course sequence in the following summer.

French/Second Research Language

The second language is typically French, though other languages, such as Latin, may be substituted if shown to be of central importance to dissertation research and formally approved by the program director prior to matriculation. Proficiency in the second research language is demonstrated in one of two ways:

  1. Complete the French (or Latin, if approved) course sequence offered by the divinity school (French I / Latin I are offered in the fall and French II / Latin II are offered in the spring) and pass the exam given at the end of the course. (Please note: The Latin course is only offered on demand, and may not be available in a given year.)
  2. Take the proficiency exam on one of the ADO’s pre-set language proficiency test dates. If the student fails the French / Other Language proficiency exam, she or he must retake the exam at the first test date of the next semester (e.g., if a student fails the exam in the summer or fall, the retake must be done at the first test date in spring). The only exception to this retake rule is for students who took the exam prior to the first fall semester of their program and elect to take the French (or Latin, if approved) course sequence during the school year (see option 1 above for details).

Residency Requirements

All students are required to enroll for a minimum of four semesters on campus, two of which are consecutive and full time. Continuous participation in the doctoral learning community (THS Community Gathering on Thursday and colloquia) is expected during the required period of residency.

Serving missionaries who find it impossible to leave their ministries for two or three continuous years may apply for an exception to the requirement for continuous enrollment in the program. Students who are granted an exception will still have to spend at least four semesters on campus and complete the program within seven years.

Student Assessment

Student Progress Evaluation

Upon completion of the first year in the program (typically 18 or more hours, including advanced standing), each student’s fitness for PhD study is evaluated. Student progress is assessed by several criteria: completion of program deficiencies, including course work; Greek, Hebrew, and research language proficiency; cumulative GPA; writing aptitude; promise of teaching/research ability; exemplary Christian character; involvement in the academic community; and department of concentration recommendations. The student progress evaluation is initiated by the program director in consultation with the department chair.

In a case where the program director, faculty, or the student has concerns about the student’s’ academic progress, or if there is some other reason the student is unable to complete the PhD/THS program, the program director and the student should meet. If the program director is unable to recommend that the student continue in the program, or if the student believes that he or she is unable to continue the program, the student may be given the option of completing a terminal Master of Theology degree in lieu of completing the PhD/THS program. If such action is recommended by the program director in consultation with the chair of the student’s department of concentration, the student must submit a written request to withdraw from the PhD/THS to the program director. Completed course work is evaluated according to the following criteria:

  1. When 48 or more hours of PhD-level coursework has been completed and the PhD Comprehensive Exam has been passed (at the ThM level), the student may be considered for a ThM. If the PhD Comprehensive Exam has not been taken, the ThM Comprehensive Exam must be passed. The capstone thesis or major research papers requirement is waived in lieu of the substantive writing in program courses.
  2. When fewer than 48 hours of PhD-level course work has been completed, the student may complete a Change of Program form through the Admissions Office with applicable coursework transferring into the ThM degree program, and the ThM Major Comprehensive Exam must be passed. (In the case of a student having completed 36 or more hours of PhD course work, the capstone thesis or major research papers requirement is waived in lieu of the substantive writing in program courses.)
  3. A second ThM from Trinity in the same concentration will not be awarded in cases where a Trinity ThM has already been awarded. Students opting for the ThM in lieu of the PhD/THS will not be readmitted at some future date to a PhD program at Trinity.

Comprehensive Examination

Students take the PhD major comprehensive examination after the completion of entrance deficiencies and language requirements and prior to registering for dissertation research. The major comprehensive examination focuses on the student’s concentration, with special attention given to matters of theological method and theological integration.

Candidacy Requirements

Admission to the PhD/THS program does not guarantee acceptance into candidacy for the degree. A student will be certified as a candidate for the degree only after:

  1. Fulfillment of all deficiencies and prerequisites indicated as conditions for admission
  2. Successful completion of a minimum of 54 hours of courses (including all doctoral seminars and the approved education and research methods courses) with a grade of “B-” or higher in each
  3. A cumulative grade point average of 3.2 or better
  4. Successful completion of the minimum residency requirement of four semesters, which includes two consecutive semesters of full-time (minimum of 9 hours) course work.
  5. Successful completion of all biblical and research language proficiency requirements
  6. Successful completion of the major comprehensive examinations and conditions (if any)
  7. Acceptance of the dissertation research proposal and revisions (if any)
  8. Attendance at a minimum of four doctoral colloquia

Students must receive candidacy before registering for the first dissertation research course.

Leave of Absence

For extraordinary reasons (prolonged illness, serious family crisis, unusual work situation), a doctoral participant may be granted a leave of absence from the program. Request for a leave of absence is to be submitted in writing to the program director and the ADC for consideration. The letter must include the reason(s) for the requested leave of absence and be submitted during the circumstance, or as soon as possible after the event. A leave of absence may be granted on more than one occasion but not to exceed two years in total. Once approved, the leave of absence will not be counted against the program statute of limitations (seven years). Similarly, the leave of absence will suspend the time related to continuation fees.

The Dissertation

Students are encouraged to begin preparatory work on their dissertation early in the program and to formally secure a mentor and second reader as early as possible. A hearing to approve the dissertation proposal is normally held after the successful passing of the comprehensive examinations.

After being granted candidacy the student proceeds with the writing of the dissertation, embodying original research and making a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. Students enroll for a minimum of two consecutive semesters of dissertation research and, if necessary, for dissertation continuation courses thereafter until the dissertation is written, the oral defense successfully completed, and the final copies received. No letter grades are assigned for these courses.

Once the dissertation has been completed, the student is required to defend the dissertation before the dissertation committee consisting of the Dissertation Mentor, the second reader, and the program director. The dissertation defense is in the form of an open hearing including faculty and peers. An external reader can be invited to submit a written report to the Dissertation Mentor. Once the dissertation has been successfully completed and defended, the student will make whatever corrections are necessary and proceed to have the manuscript prepared in final form according to requisite style requirements. Upon acceptance of the final copies, the student has completed all requirements for the degree. The Academic Doctoral Committee will then make a recommendation to the faculty for graduation.

Graduation Requirements

Students pursuing the PhD/THS degree are required to satisfy the following graduation requirements:

  1. Recommendation by the faculty of eligibility for the degree on the basis of academic stature and evidence of Christian life and character during residence at Trinity
  2. Successful completion of all course requirements, including a minimum of 54 hours in appropriate seminars, core courses, electives, comprehensive exams and dissertation proposal preparation, and 6 hours of dissertation writing courses, with a minimum cumulative grade point average for program course work of 3.2 (on a 4.0 scale), with no grade below “B-” applicable to the degree
  3. Successful demonstration of proficiency in the requisite biblical and research languages
  4. Successful completion of the minimum residency requirement of four semesters, which includes two consecutive semesters of full-time (minimum of 9 hours) course work
  5. Attendance at four doctoral colloquia
  6. Passing of the major comprehensive examination and the dissertation proposal hearing
  7. Successful acquisition of candidacy
  8. Submission of the Application for Graduation form to the Records Office
  9. Successful completion and defense of an approved dissertation that exhibits the student’s ability to do competent research, to think critically, and to communicate effectively
  10. Completion of all requirements for the degree within seven years from matriculation or completion of additional program requirements as outlined under Statute of Limitations and Program Continuation
  11. Settlement of all financial obligations to Trinity and any other ACTS seminaries with the Office of Student Financial Services.

Statute of Limitations and Program Continuation

All program requirements (coursework and dissertation) for the degree are to be completed within seven years from matriculation.

Extension beyond seven years is contingent upon the approval of the program director, the Dissertation Mentor, and the Academic Doctoral Committee. Participants who are convinced that they will be unable to finish in seven years may apply in writing prior to the end of the seventh year for a program extension, which will give up to a maximum of three more years for degree completion. Ordinarily, program extensions will be granted only to students who have attained candidacy. Such an extension must be approved by the Academic Doctoral Committee and will be granted only if the program director and Dissertation Mentor (where applicable) agree that the participant is making appropriate progress toward degree completion and that the area of research remains viable. In addition, the program director and mentor may make the extension contingent on specific further academic work. Such work may include but is not limited to

  1. additional reading assignments,
  2. the successful completion of one or more courses,
  3. the successful retaking of the comprehensive examination, and
  4. a new dissertation proposal.

Failure to complete any of the assigned further academic work by the deadline(s) set by the program director and mentor will result in immediate and automatic expulsion from the program.

Continuation fees are assessed to PhD/THS students for each semester of Dissertation Extension, Private Study, or for failure to enroll in course work (excluding summer).

Program Withdrawal

In the rare occurrence of a doctoral student finding it necessary to withdraw from the degree program, he or she must notify both the Program Office and Records Office in writing of the desired change in program status. All fees accrued prior to formal notification of program withdrawal are still payable in full.

Program of Study

The PhD/THS is structured to provide course offerings that will allow flexibility in the light of each student’s theological concentration. There is no prescribed sequence of courses, except for ST 9100 and ST 9110 (which should be taken in the first fall semester of PhD study). Students are expected to plan course selection with their faculty advisor.

Doctoral Seminars

Doctoral seminar courses are numbered 9000 or above. Most will be taken in the student’s department of concentration; however, three seminars must be taken outside of the student’s department of concentration in specially designated courses (one seminar in each of the nonconcentration departments). The “Advanced Theological Prolegomena” seminar (ST 9100) should be taken during the first fall semester of the student’s program. If seating permits, seminars may substitute for advanced electives.

Advanced Electives

Advanced electives are generally numbered 7500-8999. Students are strongly encouraged to pursue elective studies in their department of concentration. If seating permits, seminars numbered 9000 or above may substitute for advanced electives.

Education and Research Courses

A total of 3 semester hours are required in courses in higher education and research methodology.

Comprehensive Examination and Proposal Preparation Courses

One or two semesters of — 9975 are used to prepare for the Comprehensive examination. One semester of — 9990 is used to prepare for the development of the dissertation proposal. See the THS Handbook for Participants for more information on full-time and part-time status during the comprehensive examination and proposal preparation.

PhD Colloquia

Attendance is required at a minimum of four noncredit PhD academic gatherings intended specifically for all PhD/THS students. Applicable PhD colloquia are announced by the Academic Doctoral Office and offered each semester, excluding the summer.

Dissertation Research

Students take between two and six semesters of Dissertation Research (— 9991), with no more than 4 credits of dissertation being taken in a given semester. See the THS Handbook for Participants for more information on full-time and part-time status during the research and writing of the dissertation.

PhD/THS Program Minors

Qualified students in the PhD/THS program will be permitted to take a 9-semester-hour minor in one of the other two doctoral programs. Qualified participants should:

  1. demonstrate strong master’s level preparation in their primary field of study and
  2. secure permission for the minor and the courses to be applied toward the minor from their program director and from the director of the program in which they wish to do a minor.

Minors for PhD/THS program participants are completed in the following ways:

PhD/THS minor in Intercultural Studies9 semester hours in intercultural studies courses are completed in lieu of the dissertation proposal course (3 hours), comprehensive exam preparation course (3 hours), and 3 hours of advanced electives.

PhD/THS minor in Educational Studies9 semester hours in educational studies courses are completed in lieu of the dissertation proposal course (3 hours), comprehensive exam preparation course (3 hours), 1 hour of advanced electives, and the required education course, ST 9222.

PhD/THS program participants electing to complete a minor should be aware that this may lengthen their program of study (i.e., minors are taken in lieu of dissertation proposal and comprehensive exam preparation courses whose content must then be completed independently). Participants may register for — 9975 and — 9990 for 0 credit hours in order to maintain full-time status.

Program course requirements are as follows:

Church History/Historical Theology Concentration

Required Courses
Select three Historical Theology seminars12
Select one New Testament seminar4
Select one Old Testament seminar4
Select one Systematic Theology seminar4
ST 9100Advanced Theological Prolegomena4
ST 9110The Theological Scholar1
ST 9222Principles of Higher Education2
CH 8911Colloquium in Historical Methodology I1
CH 8912Colloquium in Historical Methodology II1
Advanced Electives
Select 15 hours of advanced electives15
Comprehensive Exam Preparation and Dissertation
CH 9975Comprehensive Exam Preparation3
CH 9990Dissertation Proposal Preparation3
Dissertation6
Dissertation Research (two to six semesters)
Total Hours60

New Testament Concentration

Required Courses
Select three New Testament seminars12
Select one Historical Theology seminar4
Select one Old Testament seminar4
Select one Systematic Theology seminar4
ST 9100Advanced Theological Prolegomena4
ST 9110The Theological Scholar1
ST 9222Principles of Higher Education2
NT 8911New Testament Research2
Advanced Electives
Select 15 hours of advanced electives15
Comprehensive Exam and Dissertation Preparation
NT 9975Comprehensive Exam Preparation3
NT 9990Dissertation Proposal Prep3
Dissertation6
Dissertation Research (two to six semesters; 6 hours total)
Total Hours60

Old Testament Concentration

Focus in Old Testament Hebrew, Literature, and Exegesis

Required Courses
Select three Old Testament seminars12
Select one Historical Theology seminar4
Select one New Testament seminar4
Select one Systematic Theology seminar4
ST 9100Advanced Theological Prolegomena4
ST 9110The Theological Scholar1
ST 9222Principles of Higher Education2
OT 8911Old Testament Studies I: Pentateuch & Former Prophets2
OT 8912Old Testament Studies II: Latter Prophets & Writings2
Advanced Electives
Select 13 hours of advanced electives13
Comprehensive Exam and Dissertation Preparation
OT 9975Comprehensive Exam Preparation3
OT 9990Dissertation Proposal Prep3
Dissertation6
Dissertation Research (two to six semesters; 6 hours total)
Total Hours60

Focus in Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Language

Required Courses
Select one Old Testament Seminar4
OT 7680Literature of the Ancient Near East3
OT 8xxx Religions of the ANE3
OT 8811History & Archaelogy of the Ancient Near East I3
OT 8812History & Archaelogy of the Ancient Near East II3
Select 9 hours of Ancient Near Eastern Required Languages9
Select one Historical Theology seminar4
Select one New Testament seminar4
ST 9100Advanced Theological Prolegomena4
ST 9110The Theological Scholar1
ST 9222Principles of Higher Education2
OT 8911Old Testament Studies I: Pentateuch & Former Prophets2
OT 8912Old Testament Studies II: Latter Prophets & Writings2
Advanced Electives
Select 10 hours of advanced electives10
Comprehensive Exam and Dissertation Preparation
OT 9975Comprehensive Exam Preparation0
OT 9990Dissertation Proposal Prep0
Dissertation6
Dissertation Research (two to six semesters; 6 hours total)
Total Hours60

Systematic Theology Concentration

Required Courses
Select three Systematic Theology seminars12
Select one Historical Theology seminar4
Select one New Testament seminar4
Select one Old Testament seminar4
ST 9100Advanced Theological Prolegomena4
ST 9110The Theological Scholar1
ST 9222Principles of Higher Education2
Advanced Electives
Select 17 hours of advanced electives17
Comprehensive Exam and Dissertation Preparation
ST 9975Comprehensive Exam Preparation3
ST 9990Dissertation Proposal Prep3
Dissertation6
Dissertation Research (two to six semesters; 6 hours total)
Total Hours60