Interdisciplinary Course Descriptions

ID 4010 Introduction to German - 2 Hours

An introduction to German vocabulary, grammar, and the reading of German texts. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Offered summer.

ID 4011 Theological German I - 2 Hours

An introduction to German theological vocabulary, review of grammar, and readings from selected theological literature in German. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Prerequisite: ID 4010, at least one year of college/university German, or consent of instructor. Offered summer.

ID 4012 Theological German II - 2 Hours

Further study of German theological vocabulary, grammar, and readings from selected theological literature in German. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Prerequisite: ID 4011. Offered summer.

ID 4021 Theological French I - 3 Hours

An introduction to French vocabulary, grammar, and the reading of French theological texts. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. No prerequisite. Offered fall.

ID 4022 Theological French II - 3 Hours

Further study of French theological vocabulary, grammar, and readings from selected theological literature in French. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Prerequisite: ID 4021. Offered spring.

ID 5000 Biblical Theology and Interpretation - 3 Hours

A survey of biblical theology, including methodological issues of debate during the last two centuries. Emphasis on the Bible's storyline, examining how the books and corpora of the Bible contribute to the unfolding history of redemption. Attention is given to themes of temple, sacrifice, priest, rest, kingship, exile, idolatry, promise, messiah, wisdom, and others. Finally, the relationship of biblical theology with other disciplines, especially exegesis and systematic theology, is considered. Required for all MA in CM, MA in MHC, and MDiv students. Should be taken during first year of enrollment. Offered fall and spring.

ID 5001 Foundations for Integrative Thought - 3 Hours

This course surveys the Bible from the standpoint of its unfolding history of creation, fall, redemption, and consummation, with special attention to Scriptural applications and ramifications for ethical behavior. The course considers how precedents, themes, truths, and strategies that established God's will in earlier times provide direction for God's people today. Students will practice interpreting scripture responsibly and thinking creatively about current issues in the light of biblical principles.

ID 5002 Foundations for Cultural Engagement - 3 Hours

This course introduces the student to pivotal Christian doctrines as a framework within which to evaluate the working assumptions of contemporary culture. In addition to investigating several models for Christian engagement with culture, the course encourages the positive formation of a Christian worldview as a foundation for wise interaction with contemporary thought.

ID 5010 Foundations in Biblical Studies - 3 Hours

The course emphasizes biblical content and application with attention to developing skills to guide interpretation and understanding of Scripture in order to build, inform, and critique vocational practice. In the context of such an overview, relevant passages throughout the whole of Scripture may be sampled with particular attention to methods of understanding, interpreting, and applying such passages. This course does not satisfy requirements in the MDiv program. Not open to students taking OT 5000 or NT 5000. Offered fall.

ID 5061 Latin I - 2 Hours

Latin I is the first of two sequential courses in the study of the fundamentals of Latin morphology, grammar, and syntax, as well as basic vocabulary. Skills in reading, understanding, and translating adapted and unadapted passages will be developed, with special emphasis on the Latin Church fathers and other Christian texts. No audits. Offered on demand.

ID 5062 Latin II - 2 Hours

Latin II is the second of two sequential courses in the study of the fundamentals of Latin morphology, grammar, and syntax, as well as basic vocabulary. Skills in reading, understanding, and translating adapted and unadapted passages will be developed, with special emphasis on the Latin Church fathers and other Christian texts. Prerequisite ID 5061. No audits. Offered on demand.

ID 5080 Formation Group - 0 Hours

Formation Group is an intentional weekly experience under the leadership of a faculty member. Formation Groups seek to grow together in biblical wisdom, in the grace of God, and in relationships and relational skills. MDiv students must register for two semesters prior to candidacy, generally the first two semesters of enrollment; MA students may register for two semesters in lieu of one PT 5090 Field Education requirement. Additional semesters by MDiv or non-MDiv students with or without registration are encouraged. Regular attendance necessary for credit, only two absences permitted. Credit / No Credit. Offered fall and spring.

ID 6000 Current Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies - 1-3 Hours

Selected topics of general or interdisciplinary interest.

ID 6012 Prayer and Life in the Spirit - 2 Hours

The Northside Chicago Theological Institute is a consortium of five theological seminaries on the north of Chicago that jointly sponsors a course each spring. The course is conducted in a two-evening and two-weekend retreat format on the campus of St. Mary of the Lake Seminary in Mundelein. The spring topic varies in its examination of Christian life and practice. A minimal meal/lodging fee is charged. May be repeated as topic changes. Credit / No Credit. Offered spring.

ID 6500 Understanding the Social and Cultural Contexts of Ministry - 2 Hours

Employing theories and methods from anthropology and sociology, this course aims to equip the student to exegete and critically analyze the socio-cultural context of today's changing world from a biblical and theologically informed perspective. The course will then seek to help the student to understand the dialectic relationship between the church and its surrounding cultures/societies and the church's call to be an effective and prophetic witness in the contemporary world. Students will acquire context-oriented understandings and skills that will inform their ministry strategies and practices.

ID 6910 Research Methods - 1 Hour

The techniques for conducting competent graduate-level bibliographic research, as well as attention to the planning, preparation, and writing of theses, will be covered in this course, which is required of all students completing the MA degree with the thesis option. Course will not count toward the 30-hour program requirement. (CR/NC only; not available for Audit).

ID 7375 Clinical Pastoral Education - 1-2 Hours

The Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) (www.acpe.edu) provides education related to pastoral care through the clinical educational methods of Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE). The CPE experience, with subsequent submission of a summary report, is available for Trinity elective credit. May be repeated. Credit/No Credit.

ID 7465 MA in Ministry Capstone Experience - 3-6 Hours

A ministry-based experience for MA in Ministry students that integrates the biblical/theological/historical with the ministry practice and context components of the program and provides the capacity for further specialized service in the church. The experience may be a practicum or project and will reflect 168 hours of experiential learning accompanied by a 7,500-10,000-word critical analysis paper (for 3 hours credit) demonstrating integration of program components with the area of ministry specialization. Counts as half-time academic status. Letter grade only.

ID 7466 MA in Ministry Capstone Experience Extension - 0 Hours

A one-semester extension for ID 7465. Enrollment with consent of the faculty member of record. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as quarter-time academic status. No Credit.

ID 7468 MA (Theological Studies) Capstone - 2 Hours

A program capstone for MA (Theological Studies) students that purposes to integrate the general theological education received by the program participant. The capstone may be an integrative paper or a project as defined in the Academic Handbook and will reflect approximately eighty-four clock hours of work. Counts as half-time academic status. Letter grade only.

ID 7469 MA (Theological Studies) Capstone Extension - 0 Hours

A one-semester extension for ID 7468. Enrollment with consent of the faculty member of record. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. May not be repeated, except on the South Florida campus, where it may be repeated on one occasion. No Credit.

ID 7478 MA Capstone Project - 0-3 Hours

A department-specific summative program project (MA/E, MA/CM) as arranged with the department of concentration. Not available in all programs.

ID 7480 MA Capstone Integrative Paper - 0-2 Hours

Participants in MA programs requiring a capstone integrative paper register for this course (MA/ICS). Specific paper requirements should be obtained from the department. Counts as half-time academic status. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as required by the program.

ID 7481 MA Capstone Integrative Paper Extension - 0 Hours

A one-semester extension for ID 7480. Enrollment with consent of the faculty member of record. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as quarter-time academic status. May not be repeated. No Credit.

ID 7482 MDiv Capstone Research Paper - 0 Hours

MDiv participants in the Research Ministry Focus complete two capstone research papers and must register for ID 7482 concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing an MDiv capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded C- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

ID 7484 MDiv Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for ID 7483 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis and with the consent of the Program Director. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter-time thereafter.

ID 7501 Guided Research - 1-6 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

ID 7750 Study Tour - 1-4 Hours

Study tour sponsored by the university involving travel to a site of biblical or historic Christian interest, or a ministry-based study tour. May be substituted for a required OT or NT course by petition.

ID 7900 Theological Research Methods - 2 Hours

The techniques for gaining bibliographical control over the literature of theological subjects, as well as attention to the planning, preparation, and writing of theses are covered in this class. Credit / No Credit. Offered fall and spring.

ID 8100 Scholarship and the Christian Mind - 3 Hours

This course introduces students to central themes and issues related to academic ministry in secular and Christian universities and seminaries. Students will explore and engage in topics including: vocational stewardship in the academy; Christian worldview and intellectual life; the history and philosophical foundations of the modern university; Christian faithfulness and fruitfulness in academic teaching and research. Each of these topics will be considered in light of students' personal gifts and vocational direction with the aim of exploring how their evangelical Christian faith might inform their teaching and scholarship.

ID 9200 Interdisciplinary THS Seminar I - 4 Hours

This seminar course is intended to promote significant cross-disciplinary study, reflection, and interaction on a (set of) biblical text(s) (OT and/or NT) with special focus on the theological issues raised in the text(s). One faculty member from each THS department will participate in bringing this discussion to the class from the point of view of their particular discipline. The course will consist primarily of papers and responses presented by the students along with open ended class discussion.

ID 9300 Interdisciplinary THS Seminar II - 4 Hours

This seminar course is intended to promote significant cross-disciplinary study, reflection, and interaction on the dissertation projects of the students in the course, with special focus on the theological issues raised in the dissertation. Two THS faculty will lead the course; one in biblical studies (OT/NT) and one in theological studies (ST/HT). The course will consist primarily of papers and responses presented by the students along with open ended class discussion.

Church History and the History of Christian Thought Department Course Descriptions

CH 5051 History of Christianity I - 3 Hours

This course explores the development of Christianity from its inception in the first century to the close of the Reformation era in the sixteenth century. Through a sympathetic engagement with primary and secondary historical sources, students will acquire a general understanding of the patristic period; the ecumenical councils; the emergence of medieval polity, philosophy and theology; the cultural synthesis of the high middle ages; the Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe; and the Protestant and Catholic Reformations.

CH 5052 History of Christianity II - 3 Hours

This course explores the development of Christianity from the post-Reformation era to the present day. Through a sympathetic engagement with primary and secondary historical sources, students will acquire a general understanding of the contributions of Protestant orthodoxy; Puritanism and Pietism; the rise of modern secularism; the proliferation of Protestant denominations; the "Enlightenment"; the Evangelical awakenings and revivals in Europe and North America; the Wesleyan movement; nineteenth century missionary expansion; the advance of Christianity in the majority world; modern Pentecostal Christianity; and current theological trends.

CH 5060 American Church History - 3 Hours

The transition of European churches to America and their involvement with theological, liturgical, social, and political issues; the nature of Puritanism; separation of church and state; awakenings and revivals; social concern; liberalism, fundamentalism, neo-orthodoxy, and contemporary evangelicalism are subjects of this course. Offered fall and spring.

CH 6000 Current Studies Church History - 1-3 Hours

Topics selected that deal with significant issues related to Christian history and thought.

CH 7210 Patristic Age - 3 Hours

Introduction to Christian life and thought between the close of the New Testament canon and the beginnings of the medieval period under Pope Gregory I (ca. 600) with emphasis on the major church fathers through primary and relevant secondary sources. Prerequisite: CH 5052 or consent of department chair.

CH 7215 History of Christianity in the Middle Ages - 3 Hours

The course is designed to give an overview of ecclesiastical, political, and theological issues affecting the forms of Christianity from about 529 through 1453. Particular attention is given to the development of the office of the bishop of Rome, the relation between empire and church, missions, monasticism, the philosophy and theology of scholasticism, and the factors affecting the development of conciliarism.

CH 7225 The Reformation Era - 3 Hours

Historical and theological overview of the changes in the history of Western Christendom through Luther's rediscovery of the gospel is the course focus. Topics covered include condition of the late medieval church; the Lutheran, Zwinglian, and Calvinist reformations; the rise of Anglicanism; the Anabaptists and other movements; and the Counter-Reformation. Prerequisite: CH 5052 or consent of department chair.

CH 7411 History of Free Church Movement - 2 Hours

A study of the emergence of the Free Church Movement as a vital force in European Christianity; the contributions of leading personalities to the free churches; the interplay of European pietism with the movement; and the spread of the movement to North America with special reference to the Evangelical Free Church of America.

CH 7450 Christianity in the Non-Western World Since 1500 - 3 Hours

A broad overview of the significant shift of the center of Christianity from the West to Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The social, cultural, and political context of Western missions, the sending nations, and the receiving nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America will be examined. Consideration will be given to: early modern Roman Catholic missions, the impact of African slavery and Western imperialism, the development of Protestant Christianity, the emergence of independent and indigenous church movements, and the rise of Pentecostalism.

CH 7477 MA Major Comprehensive Exam - 1 Hour

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some MA programs. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

CH 7485 MA Thesis - 0-3 Hours

MA thesis writers register for - 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as fulltime academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

CH 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for - 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

CH 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit/No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

CH 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Preparation - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

CH 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Preparation - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

CH 7980 MA Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

MA participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for 7980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a MA capstone research paper (MA/PR). Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded C- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

CH 8000 Seminar: Current Issues in the History of Christian Thought - 2-4 Hours

Topics chosen to interrelate the divisions of theology; attention focused on current issues or important neglected areas of Christian history and thought.

CH 8100 Classic Texts in the History of Christianity - 3-4 Hours

The course provides students the opportunity to read and discuss the most important books of the classical intellectual tradition, exploring ways in which the insights and arguments of these authors have shaped intellectual life in Christian history and the modern world. Two professors from the Church History Department will co-teach this course. They will facilitate class discussions as well as present background materials to help students interpret these writings in their historical and intellectual contexts. Although the booklist may change year-to-year, important texts will include Plato, Symposium, Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, Ponticus, The Praktikos Chapters on Prayer, Athanasius, On the Incarnation, Augustine, Confessions, Aquinas, Summa Theologica, Luther, Babylonian Captivity of the Church, Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion, Descartes, Discourse on Method, Voltaire, Candide, Rousseau, Confessions, Wesley, Standard Sermons, Darwin, Origins of Species, Schleiermacher, Speeches on Religion, Hitler, My Struggle, Camus, Myth of Sisyphus and The Stranger, Gutierrez, A Theology of Liberation, and Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Master's three hours, doctoral 3+1 hours.

CH 8235 The Enlightenment - 3-4 Hours

CH 8235 The Enlightenment Religious life and thought during the 18th century with special consideration of Deism and efforts by orthodox Christians to counter this philosophical tendency. Master's three hours, doctoral 3+1 hours.

CH 8270 Protestant Thought in Nineteenth Century America - 3-4 Hours

Introduction to the leading Protestant theologians and theological schools of nineteenth-century America, with special attention to topics and issues most controversial among the schools. Emphasis on primary source readings from the New England theologians, the Mercersburg School, Old Princeton, Wesleyan/Holiness sources, and the New Theology. Master's three hours, doctoral 3+1 hours.

CH 8280 History of Fundamentalism and Evangelicalism - 3-4 Hours

An analysis of the history of Fundamentalism and Evangelicalism with particular reference to recent interpretations of these movements. Emphasis is placed on the question of Evangelical self-identity. Master's three hours, doctoral 3+1 hours.

CH 8320 Luther - 3-4 Hours

An examination of the life of the German reformer Martin Luther (1483-1546) in light of contemporary research, with special attention paid to important dimensions of his religious thought, such as his view of justification, the Word, the sacraments, pastoral ministry, and the relationship of church and state. Master's three hours, doctoral 3+1 hours.

CH 8330 Calvin - 3-4 Hours

An examination of the life of the French reformer John Calvin (1509-1564) in light of contemporary research, with special attention paid to important dimensions of his religious thought, such as his view of the knowledge of God, providence, the Scripture, pastoral ministry, church discipline, and predestination. Master's three hours, doctoral 3+1 hours.

CH 8361 Jonathan Edwards - 3-4 Hours

Introduction to the life, times, and especially the theology of Jonathan Edwards. Intensive reading in and reflection on some of Edwards's most important writings. Extensive reading and discussion about Edwards's historical background (primarily in New England Puritanism) and historical legacy (with primary attention paid to the development of 'the New England Theology'). Master's three hours, doctoral 3+1 hours.

CH 8415 The Forgotten Reformers - 3-4 Hours

A study of the history, theology, and legacy of important - yet too often 'forgotten' - religious reformers of sixteenth-century Europe, drawn from primary sources and current secondary literature. Some of the church leaders treated include Gasparo Contarini and Ignatius of Loyola (Catholic); Philip Melanchthon (Lutheran); Andreas Karlstadt (Lutheran-Radical); Martin Bucer, Heinrich Bullinger, and Theodore Beza (Reformed); Balthasar Hubmaier and Menno Simons (Anabaptist).

CH 8435 French Protestant Theology 1515-1685 - 3-4 Hours

A survey of Protestant theology and religious practice in French-speaking Europe from the reign of Francis I (1515-47) to the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685). Particular attention will be paid to doctrinal development and debates as well as the religious struggles of French Protestants during this period. The theology and role of prominent Protestant leaders such as Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples, Guillaume Farel, John Calvin, Theodore Beza, Jacob Arminius, Moise Amyraut, and Francis Turretin will be highlighted.

CH 8465 Pastoral Ministry in the Reformation - 3-4 Hours

A study of the theology and practice of pastoral ministry in Protestant churches during the era of the Reformation. Special attention will be given to the growing body of scholarly literature related to the clerical office in early modern Europe, including local and regional studies of Protestant clergy and clerical institutions; statistical studies of the social profile of early modern European clergy; and, specialized studies of activities related to the pastoral vocation, including education, preaching, public worship, catechetical instruction, and moral discipline.

CH 8710 Advanced Study in American Christianity - 2-4 Hours

Historiographical analysis of important recent literature in the field of American religious history. This seminar's primary purpose will be to keep advanced students abreast of the state of the conversation within the discipline, enabling them to enter this conversation from the point of view of their own research. Two to four hours, doctoral as posted.

CH 8862 Origins of Modern Biblical Criticism in 17th & 18th Century - 4 Hours

A study of the multiple springs that fed the gathering stream of modern biblical criticism in the 17th and 18th centuries. Reference is made to the history of science, the history of philosophy, the history of book trade, and other disciplines. Particular attention is given to individuals such as Baruch Spinoza, Richard Simon, Jean Le Clerc, Reimarus, J. S. Semler, Lessing, Voltaire, and their critics. Course objectives include an improved understanding of the evangelical doctrine of biblical inspiration, the history of hermeneutics, and questions related to biblical authority.

CH 8911 Colloquium in Historical Methodology I - 1 Hour

A methodological colloquium team-taught by all regular and available faculty members in the department of church history. General issues of historical methodology are discussed, with a special emphasis placed on the relationship between Christian faith and historical understanding. Offered fall.

CH 8912 Colloquium in Historical Methodology II - 1 Hour

A methodological colloquium team-taught by all regular and available faculty members in the department of church history. Historical work of the students enrolled will be discussed with a view to improving that work by means of rigorous methodological analysis and to preparing the students enrolled for the writing of their theses. Offered spring.

CH 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for - 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. 177 Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.

CH 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-3 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for - 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as fulltime academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

CH 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for - 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

CH 9001 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. Available in all PhD programs. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours in PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS programs; may be repeated for a maximum of six hours in the PhD/THS program. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

CH 9011 Private Study - 0 Hours

In special circumstances, a student may register for one or more semesters of Private Study in order to meet the requirements for candidacy. Only for PhD/THS students in CH, NT, OT, ST departments. Counts as full-time student status when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week (half-time is 15 hours per week) are invested in doctoral study and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. May be repeated four times. No Credit.

CH 9490 Advanced Study in the Reformation - 3-4 Hours

A survey of the historiography of the sixteenth-century Reformation in Europe examining representative works by some of the most important contemporary scholars of the Reformation era. Special attention will be paid to different methodological approaches, including social, cultural, and economic history.

CH 9880 The New Religious History - 3-4 Hours

Historiographical analysis of the 'new religious history' based on recent, representative works in the social and cultural history of American religion with attention paid to issues of race, ethnicity, class, and gender/sexuality as they have arisen in the study of American religious history. Also included is methodological discussion of recent economic and material histories of American religion, ethnographic studies, and the new emphasis on such topics as popular religion and congregational history.

CH 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat the course twice for a total of three hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat it once. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been 179 completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

CH 9990 Dissertation Proposal Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. Only PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat this course twice for a total of 3 hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat this course once for a total of 3 hours. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

CH 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Course taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

CH 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.

Counseling Department Course Descriptions

CM 172 Introduction to Ministry - 3 Hours

An introduction to the purposes, challenges, and scope of various types of ministries and ministry programs, with particular focus made in those areas in which we offer emphases. Personal contact and interaction with ministry leaders will seek to enlarge the vision of students for how ministry can be carried out. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

CM 323 Advanced Integrated Field Experience - 2 Hours

An opportunity for students to participate in an intensive and advanced level of ministry leadership for a total of 120 hours per semester. Emphasis will be placed on developing strategies for facilitating personal effectiveness and maturity as a Christian leader. This fulfills one (1) service learning requirement (equivalent to IDS 106) for each semester of enrollment with a grade of C or higher. Prerequisite: CM 222-CM 223. Required for the following emphases: Children's Ministries, Counseling/Social Services, Intercultural Ministries, Pastoral Ministries, and Youth Ministries. Offered each year for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

CM 5000 Intro to Counseling Ministries - 2 Hours

An introduction to the principles, and techniques involved in the pastoral ministry of care and counseling. The course emphasizes basic counseling skills and ability to relate to others. Biblical, theological, and ethical concerns in pastoral care ministry are discussed and an overview of common counseling concerns is presented. Course format includes lecture, video, role play, and discussion. Not applicable to MA in MHC. Offered fall and spring.

CM 6000 Issues in Counseling Ministries - 1-3 Hours

Issues of interest related to pastoral counseling and counseling in ministry settings will be presented. Topics vary and are on a rotating basis. They include Spiritual Formation and Counseling, Couple's Counseling, Crisis Counseling, Bereavement Counseling, and Pastoral Counseling for Guilt, Shame, and Depression. May be repeated. Offered fall and spring.

CM 7478 MA Capstone Project - 0-3 Hours

A department-specific summative program project (MA/E, MA/CMC) as arranged with the department of concentration. Not available in all programs.

CM 7940 Clinical Pastoral Education - 2 Hours

The Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) (www.acpe.edu) provides education related to pastoral care through the clinical educational methods of Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE). The CPE experience is supplemented with TEDS faculty supervision, reading and case explorations with a cohort. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: MACMC candidacy and consent of department. Two hours.

CM 7950 Clinical Pastoral Education - 2 Hours

The Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) (www.acpe.edu) provides education related to pastoral care through the clinical educational methods of Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE). The CPE experience is supplemented with TEDS faculty supervision, reading and case explorations with a cohort. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: MACMC candidacy and consent of department.

CO 5210 Counseling Skills Training - 3 Hours

An experiential and cognitive introduction to the skills basic to any counseling setting, working with a developmental model of helping. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition and use of the basic counselling skills through an experiential participation in the counseling process. Not open to auditors.

CO 5310 Counseling Strategies: Theory, Treatment, and Technique - 3 Hours

Classical and current theories of counseling will be investigated in light of Scripture, psychological sophistication, and potential application for evidence-based practice and treatment. Strategies will be explored to formulate case conceptualization, build treatment plans, and to select in-session helping techniques.

CO 5400 Foundations of Mental Health Counseling - 3 Hours

This is an orientation to the various dimensions of mental health counseling. It provides an overview of the variety of roles offered and functions available to the mental health worker in society and in the church. The central theme to explore is what it means to pursue a professional identity, answer a ministry calling and nurture a Christian theological imagination. This provides a forum to guide Christians who counsel to engage peacefully and ethically with others in a pluralistic culture. Registration limited to MA/MHC students or by departmental permission.

CO 5578 Family and Couple Counseling - 3 Hours

The foundations and various theoretical perspectives of family systems and couple counseling are examined. Attention is also given to specific aspects of couple and family treatment, such as family development, contemporary culture/societal issues, as well as specific presenting problems-infidelity, domestic violence, divorce/remarriage, step-families and personality disorders. Note: MA in CMC/MDiv students in this course will have an alternative assignment to enhance ministry application.

CO 6000 Current Studies in Counseling - 1-3 Hours

Issues of interest related to pastoral counseling and counseling in ministry settings will be presented. Topics vary and are on a rotating basis. They include Spiritual Formation and Counseling, Couple's Counseling, Crisis Counseling, Bereavement Counseling, and Pastoral Counseling for Guilt, Shame, and Depression. May be repeated. Offered fall and spring.

CO 6110 Career Counseling - 3 Hours

The many facets of career counseling are explored. The subject will be covered from both theoretical and practical points of view. Holistic awareness of individuals will be considered in regard to how people deal with their vocational needs and goals.

CO 6120 Addiction Counseling - 3 Hours

This course examines the treatment of addictions. The philosophy, mechanisms, and physiology of substance abuse and chemical dependency are surveyed. Students will be exposed to relevant and effective approaches to counsel the person with an addiction. Important topics related to counseling are covered, such as relapse prevention, adolescent substance abuse, dual diagnosis, and family issues.

CO 6130 Group Counseling - 3 Hours

The processes, principles, and techniques related to contemporary forms of group counseling will be explored. An experiential component in this course fosters the development of group leadership skills. Not open to auditors. Prerequisite: CO 5210.

CO 6510 Human Growth and Development - 3 Hours

The theories of individual, family, and personality development across the lifespan will be reviewed. How various aspects (e.g. learning, environmental, cognitive, biological, spiritual) of human development affect human functioning are examined. The course will facilitate a general framework for understanding interventions for differing abilities as well as contemplate strategies that promote resilience and optimum development and wellness across the lifespan.

CO 6530 Child & Adolescent Counseling - 2-3 Hours

A conceptual framework for working with child and adolescent clients will be introduced along with a review of techniques developmentally appropriate for assessment and treatment plan formulation and implementation. Treatment approaches to specific childhood and adolescent mental health disorders will be examined.

CO 6570 Theories of Family Development - 2-3 Hours

This course represents an analysis of normative, developmental, and ecological changes that occur within families across the life span. Special focus is given to developmental transitions such as childbirth, adolescence, and aging.

CO 6575 Parent Education - 2-3 Hours

Basic principles in the organization, formulation, and presentation of parent study programs used in community settings. Emphasis on ways of working with children from infancy through adolescence. Principles of promoting holistic and healthy development and appropriate means of child discipline will be discussed.

CO 6610 Human Sexuality - 3 Hours

This course will deal with the physiological, psychological, and spiritual aspects of human sexuality, with particular emphasis on counseling-related issues.

CO 6640 Gender Issues - 2-3 Hours

Examines and discusses issues that are pertinent to gender. Implications for counseling are emphasized.

CO 6650 Multicultural Issues in Counseling - 3 Hours

This course examines the nature and effects of culture and ethnicity on the counseling process. The effects of worldview on diversity issues in counseling will be discussed with a special reference to a Christian worldview. Counseling issues specific to various minority populations will be addressed through case vignette and lecture.

CO 6710 Counseling and Theological Worldview: Faith and Practice - 3 Hours

This biblical-theological sequence capstone course surveys issues, models, methods and criticisms regarding the interface of empirically-based counseling with a biblically-grounded Christian theology. The course covers current literature on faith-based, spiritually-sensitive clinical approaches to familiarize the student with the process of integration and case studies to facilitate personal skill development in this crucial area.

CO 6720 Ethics & Issues in Counseling - 3 Hours

Ethical standards of the American Counseling Association are evaluated in the context of current mental health practice, professional requirements and legal standards. The major faith-based mental health associations, AACC and CAPS, Codes of Ethics are also considered. Practical applications of ethical guidelines are discussed using case vignettes. Registration limited to MA/MHC students or by departmental permission.

CO 6950 Counseling Practicum - 2-3 Hours

Practicum is designed as a pre-internship fieldwork experience with group supervision on campus. It will provide students with practical supervised experience in various counseling settings. The student will average six to eight hours per week involvement. May be repeated. Prerequisites: MAMHC Candidacy and consent of CO Department. Cap 6 per section.

CO 6955 Group Leadership Practicum - 2 Hours

Open to students who have demonstrated proficiency in the use of basic counseling skills in the CO 5210 Counseling Skills course. Students are required to be involved in the direct training of CO 5210 students under the supervision of the course professor, to meet outside of class for supervision, and to complete reading and written assignments in the area of group leadership. May be repeated. Consent of the instructor required for registration.

CO 7160 Community Counseling - 2 Hours

Counselors provide consultation services in community settings that extend beyond direct client service. The distinctions between counseling and consultation will be explored, as well as the major models and process stages for implementation. Case studies will be utilized to demonstrate explicit program development applications for educational crisis and system-level interventions, and furthering social objectives. Pastoral and church consultation will be an area of focus.

CO 7210 Assessment and Evaluation - 3 Hours

This course covers the measurement concepts and practice techniques required for the use of standardized and non-standardized assessment tools utilized in diagnosis, treatment planning and evaluation. Procedures for test selection, administration and interpretation are examined for measures of ability, aptitude, personality, and psychopathology. Prerequisite: MA in MHC candidacy or consent of department chair. A $45 materials testing fee is assessed for this course.

CO 7278 Strategies of Marriage & Family Therapy - 3 Hours

An exploration of the specific perceptual, conceptual, and intervention skills of prominent approaches in the field of marriage and family therapy. These approaches include Bowen, Minuchin, Whitaker, Satir, Milan, and Haley. Prerequisite: CO 5578.

CO 7330 Counseling Techniques - 2-3 Hours

A unique combination of theory and practice, the class helps students to enter into the world of counseling practice. Counseling Techniques utilizes contemporary treatment models, along with traditional approaches, to enhance student skills in helping people. Prerequisite: CO 5210.

CO 7450 Psychopathology - 3 Hours

This course is an advanced course dealing with the etiology, classification, and treatment of various mental disorders. Diagnostic skill in using the current DSM classifications and criteria is achieved through the use of case vignettes and lecture. Registration limited to MA/MHC students or by departmental permission.

CO 7485 MA Thesis - 0-3 Hours

MA thesis writers register for - 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as fulltime academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

CO 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for - 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

CO 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit/No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

CO 7900 Research Methods - 3 Hours

Students will learn to conceptualize research problems, develop hypotheses and propose research methodologies for study. Emphasis is given to interpretation and inference. The class will conduct an empirically supported research study in which students will have the opportunity to administer pre- and post- intervention assessments, facilitate a psycho-educational intervention, analyze and interpret data, and report the research findings. Prerequisites: MA in MHC candidacy or consent of the department chair.

CO 7905 Advanced Research Methods - 2 Hours

The topic of the course is more complex research designs and techniques and will include information about statistics and statistical computer packages. Prerequisite: CO 7900. Offered on demand.

CO 7961 Mental Health Counseling Internship I - 2-3 Hours

Internship is designed to give counseling students supervised counseling experience. Approved intern sites include hospital inpatient programs, community counseling agencies, counseling centers, and other mental health facilities. The internship may begin in summer or fall semesters (CO 7961) depending on the site requirements. It must extend through the spring semester (CO 7962). CO 7961 and 7962 require a combined total of 900 hours of internship involvement including 360 direct service hours. Individual supervision is provided on site; group supervision is provided on campus. CO 7961 and CO 7962 must be taken consecutively over the course of one academic year and total six semester hours. CO 7961 is offered in summer and fall only. Considered full-time academic status. Prerequisites: CO 6950, MAMHC candidacy and consent of department. When taken in summer for two semester hours, may be repeated in fall for two semester hours.

CO 7962 Mental Health Counseling Internship II - 2-3 Hours

This is an advanced internship experience building on skills and requirements from CO 7961. CO 7962 is offered in spring only. Considered full-time academic status. Prerequisite CO 7961.

CO 7969 International Counseling Experience - 3 Hours

This course is designed for those primarily invested in returning to an international setting where they have prior exposure, language fluency, and mental health connections. International students, who are not exclusively seeking U.S. licensure, may benefit from a supervised international counseling experience. Individual onsite supervision is required as well as special arrangements with the department. All syllabus requirements for CO 7961/7962 will be applied with flexibility and the application of technology. Full-time academic status. Prerequisites: MA in MHC candidacy and consent of department. May be repeated for credit.

CO 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Preparation - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

CO 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Preparation - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

CO 8000 Seminar: Current Issues - 1-4 Hours

Consideration of contemporary issues in professional and ministry counseling. Recent titles include the following: Clinical Consulting, Grief Therapy, and Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. Prerequisites: degree candidacy or consent of department chair. May be repeated.

CO 8075 Advanced Group Process - 3 Hours

The course examines the nature of interpersonal interactions in group counseling. An experiential component will enhance the understanding of group process and foster the development of group counseling skills that promote group interaction and interpersonal processes. Prerequisites: CO 5210 and CO 6130 or equivalent.

CO 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for - 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. 177 Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.

CO 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-3 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for - 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as fulltime academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

CO 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for - 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

Educational Ministries Department Course Descriptions

EM 5100 Educational Ministries and Leadership - 3 Hours

Educational Ministries and Leadership explores the equipping of educational and other church leaders through teaching and learning, curriculum development, discipleship, and team building as well as generational and intergenerational ministries with children, youth, emerging adults, adults, and aging adults. The course will help ministry leaders understand and function in their role as practitioners leading God's people toward maturity in Christ. Students will gain core educational and leadership competencies informed by biblical theology, a sound understanding of the human person, context, and theory. Required for MDiv students. Offered fall and spring. Available online.

EM 5125 Teaching and Learning - 2-3 Hours

This course examines how Christian teachers can deepen their conceptual understanding and educational skills as they communicate Gospel teaching in a variety of contexts. Topics addressed include maturing in Christ as a Christian teacher, developmental learning theories, teaching strategies, teaching the Bible, evaluation tools, teaching teachers, and the roles of both the teacher and the learner during the teaching and learning process. Available online.

EM 5200 Educational Ministries - 2 Hours

Educational Ministries explores the equipping of educational and other church leaders through teaching and learning, curriculum development, discipleship, and team building as well as generational and intergenerational ministries with children, youth, emerging adults, adults, and aging adults.ÿThe course willÿhelp ministry leaders understand and function in their role as practitioners leading God's people toward maturity in Christ.ÿStudents will gain core educational and leadership competencies informed by biblical theology, a sound understanding of the human person, context, and theory. Offered concurrently with EM 5100. Required for MA in EM students who should also register for EM 5210 during the same semester. May be substituted for EM 5100 when also taken with EM 5210. Offered fall and spring.

EM 5210 Christian Leadership and Administration - 2-3 Hours

What is a Christian leader? What is Christian administration? How does one lead in a system context whether church or other organization? The course will survey leadership history and theories, the character of the leader, and topics such as teams, communication, power, conflict, change, ethics, administration, and mentoring. Case studies will be used to assist participants in applying leadership theory to practice. Depending on the mode, this class is offered for one, two, or three hours. Offered concurrently with EM 5100 in the fall with additional meeting times. Required for MA in EM students who should also register for EM 5200 during the same semester. May be substituted for EM 5100 when also taken with EM 5200. Offered fall and spring. Available online.

EM 5510 Christian Formation & Journey - 2 Hours

An interactive exploration of the process of spiritual growth in the life of the believer, focusing on how the church has understood Christian spirituality and the process of Christ being formed in the believer. Special attention is given to the nature of the spiritual journey of the believer and the kind of educational interventions that are likely to enable spiritual growth in the people of God.

EM 5541 Youth and Emerging Adults in Congregations - 3 Hours

Youth and Emerging Adults in Congregations explores the equipping of leaders of Youth ages 11-18 and Emerging Adults ages 19-29. Biblical, educational, and philosophical foundations of holistic ministries in the church are explored. Research in youth culture, formative needs, competencies, adaptable skills, frameworks, and approaches needed for youth and emerging adult engagement will be addressed. Participants will gain core insights and develop personal practice for contextually ministering to youth and emerging adults enabling experiences of flourishing, connection, and belonging with and within the church. Available online.

EM 5560 Adults in Congregations - 2-3 Hours

A survey of adult development and generational differences, adult learning processes, and the ministry perspectives and structures necessary to assist Christian adults to progress toward maturity in a church or parachurch context.

EM 5576 Marriage & Family Enrichment - 2-3 Hours

Study of marriage and family from theological and social science viewpoints with a view to enriching them through methods and strategies of local church ministry. Students have the option of choosing projects to enrich their own marriage and family life or to prepare for marriage.

EM 6000 Current Topics in Educational Ministries - 1-4 Hours

Select and specialized topics relevant to educational ministry.

EM 6100 Intergenerational Ministry in the Church - 3 Hours

The course design will enable participants to develop an informed approach to ministry in the local church that builds bridges across generations. Themes in the course include intergenerational ministry in biblical and theological perspective; developmental and cultural issues in intergenerational ministry; learning and worship engaging the entire faith community; and service across the generations. Available online.

EM 6260 Small Group Ministry in the Church - 2-3 Hours

An examination of the biblical and theological foundations of small group ministry, the role of groups in spiritual formation, strategies for building group ministry in a local church, developing group dynamics, and the role and training of group leaders in guiding an effective group meeting.

EM 6265 Building Ministry Teams - 2-3 Hours

This course focuses on the role, effectiveness, structure, leadership, and impact of highly functioning teams in the church. Emphasis will be placed on team design, decision-making, mission, relationships, the role of the team in the larger organization, assessing team effectiveness and performance, and team leadership. Offered on a two-year rotation.

EM 6270 Building Community in the Church - 2-3 Hours

Focuses on building a culture of community in the local church. Includes having a basic theology of community, and an examination of existing models for building the community life of a congregation, including small group models, missional communities, classes, geography-based strategies, and medium-sized gatherings. Offered on a two-year rotation.

EM 6275 Developing Healthy Spiritual Leaders - 2-3 Hours

Participants will learn strategies and practices for developing healthy spiritual leaders, and will explore various leadership development strategies used by churches and other organizations. Offered on a two-year rotation. A retreat fee will be assessed.

EM 6500 Curriculum Development - 3 Hours

This course will prepare students to develop individual lessons and coherent curriculum products. Students will explore the application of curriculum theory and the learning sciences to curriculum development. While the skills and frameworks will be broadly applicable, the course will focus on the development of curriculum to support the mission of the church. Available online.

EM 7110 Spiritual Formation in the Family - 3 Hours

Spiritual Formation in the Family explores how the family environment is a fertile place of faith formation for all ages. Topics include exploring contemporary family structures, a biblical vision for family faith formation, the strategic partnership between church and home, and various methods and approaches for family faith formation. A special emphasis will include connecting with families through digital media and methods. Available online.

EM 7465 MA in EM Capstone - 0-4 Hours

The MA in EM Capstone is developed in consultation with the EM faculty adviser and may be a portfolio, internship, or applied ministry experience. Contact your EM faculty adviser for further details.

EM 7466 MA in EM Capstone Extension - 0 Hours

A one-semester extension for EM 7465. Enrollment with consent of the faculty member of record. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. May not be repeated. No credit.

EM 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the Educational Ministries Department. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

ES 7524 Children in Congregations - 1-2 Hours

Participants will investigate and develop a variety of options for contemporary educational and ministry experiences with children. Trends in the church's ministry to children will be considered. The variety of curricular and other resources, parachurch agencies and networks that support children's ministry in the church will be explored.

ES 7535 Nurturing Families in the Church - 1-2 Hours

Nurturing Families in the Church is an examination of the nature of marital and family relationships in preparation for participants to understand these dynamics in their own families, in the families of those to whom they minister, and the impact of these on their ability to be effective ministers. The course concludes with a consideration of church as the family of God.

ES 7550 Local Church as System - 1-2 Hours

Participants will examine how local church bodies are interdependent systems of people and practices. Topics include local church life cycles, administrative practices that build gospel health, adaptive leadership, and cultivating gospel-centered teams and partnerships.

ES 7560 Program Planning Dynamics in the Local Church - 1-3 Hours

Participants will examine how gospel-centered leaders negotiate stakeholder interests toward advancement of God's Kingdom. Topics include identifying stakeholder interests, navigating power dynamics, and planning toward mission. Available online.

ES 7815 Change, Power, and Conflict - 1-3 Hours

This course will explore the challenges of change, power, and conflict in relation to developing and transitioning Christian organizations (including but not limited to the local church). Participants will identify and clearly articulate common issues related to change, power, and conflict in organizations; create effective strategies and processes to address these issues; and foster personal attitudinal responses to change, power, and conflict that emanate from biblical wisdom.

ES 7830 Developing Collaborative Teams - 1-2 Hours

Participants will explore the theological, theoretical, and practical elements of developing collaborative teams. Topics include teams vs. groups; team selection and formation; building team trust; conflict as creative tension; measuring team effectiveness; and effective team coaching.

ES 7840 Teams in Systems - 1-2 Hours

Participants in this course will explore the nature and role of teams in systems. Some of the topics of discussion will include: team-based organizations, virtual teams, cross-functional teams, self-directed teams, and multinational teams.

ES 8000 Seminar: Current Issues in Educational Ministries - 1-4 Hours

Topics chosen deal with contemporary issues in Educational Ministries.

ES 8211 Teaching Others to Teach - 1-2 Hours

This course will connect Bible teaching with equipping others to interpret and teach the Bible. Topics include utilizing Bible study tools and resources; employing sound interpretive principles; recognizing group dynamics; identifying Biblical genres; communicating Biblical themes; harnessing effective educational methods; and identifying creative teaching strategies.

ES 8235 Ministry with Aging Adults - 1-2 Hours

Within 15 years 20% of the US population will be age 65 or older. By 2050 the number of people over age 60 in the world will outnumber youth; and the ratio of working people to retirees will decrease from 9:1 to 4:1. How is the church preparing to meet the challenge of global greying? What is its role in assisting older adults to confront health care, grief, dementia, financial challenges, and physical limitations? In what ways can senior saints contribute to the maturation of the faith community? Ministry with Aging Adults will focus not merely on how the church can ministry to senior adults, but with senior adults.

ES 8240 Intergenerational Education - 1-2 Hours

God's people are blessed with the intergenerational task of declaring the praiseworthy deeds of the Lord. Participants will examine current intergenerational theory and practice in light of Biblical texts and themes. Topics include generational developmental theories; personal mentoring and mentoring communities; and developing intergenerational teams.

ES 8255 Models of Non-Traditional Education - 3 Hours

Explores the literature related to out-of-school learning and experiential learning theories that inform the educational task of the church. Participants compare and contrast non-formal and formal educational approaches. Insights gained from these readings and class discussions are used by participants to critique various church-related models of non-formal education.

ES 8258 Online Teaching and Learning - 1-3 Hours

Twenty-first century seminary graduates will inevitably face the reality of teaching online whether it is in higher education, the local church, or another context. ES 8258 intends to raise questions and provide some answers toward developing a philosophy and practice of online education for the educator. Consideration will be given to 1) planning online classes; 2) designing online classes particularly for the adult learner; and 3) implementing online classes with attention to the participant?s context. Discussion will include the "flipped classroom," the abundance of content availability, access, and a philosophy of online teaching. Available online.

ES 8425 Theological Education: Topics - 1-2 Hours

A three-course rotation examining vernacular, primary, secondary, and tertiary, theological education in the context of Africa, Latin Americas, Asia, and North America broadly defined. Emphasis is placed on the similarities and contextual uniqueness of theological education in both majority and non-majority worlds. Presentations by international guest practitioners. May be repeated. Offered on a three-year rotation.

ES 8605 Great Religious Educators - 2-3 Hours

In the spirit of Adler's Great Books, Great Religious Educators centers around the primary writings of significant religious educators beginning with Augustine to the present. Participants will read extensively and meet regularly to discuss the primary readings and their implications for Christian education in the 21st century. Available online.

ES 8710 Social Intelligence and Leadership - 1-2 Hours

Participants in this course will examine social intelligence and its relationship to leading organizations, teams, and individual organizational members. Social intelligence includes social awareness and relationship building skills that allow leaders to foster empathy, collaboration, and teamwork with others in their organizations. Participants will critically reflect on the theological, theoretical, practical, and contextual aspects of this subject.

ES 8715 Appreciative Inquiry - 1-2 Hours

Appreciative Inquiry (AI) has been described as "The cooperative search for the best in people, their organizations, and the world around them. It involves systematic discovery of what gives a system ?life? when the system is most effective and capable in economic, ecological, and human terms." It is more than a set of tools or methods, but "a way of thinking and being" that leads to innovation for the flourishing and wholeness of larger systems or networks. In this course, we will think critically and reflect theologically about the philosophy, theory, practices, and processes of AI.

ES 9000 Current Issues in Educational Studies - 1-3 Hours

Topics are chosen to reflect research interests of faculty or program participants or that explore matters of concern to the field of educational studies. Offered on demand.

ES 9001 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

ES 9110 Orientation to EDS Doctoral Studies - 1 Hour

The Educational Studies doctoral program is designed to further the development of leaders already serving in organizations such as higher education institutions, mission agencies, congregations, parachurch agencies, and relief and development agencies. This orientation course gathers new students into an understanding of the learning culture of the community, its values, core competencies, and expected learning outcomes. Offered Fall and Spring. Credit/No Credit.

ES 9150 Teaching in Higher Education - 2 Hours

Through Biblically shaped critical reflection, participants will examine the core elements of transformative learning theory and practice. Topics include critical reflection and the mind of Christ; personal and social change dynamics; whole person domain teaching and learning; and cultivating gospel healthy learning climates.

ES 9175 Leadership and the Development of Organizations - 3 Hours

The course will survey and analyze contemporary issues in developing and leading healthy organizations. Participants will engage in theological reflection regarding potential contributions from the field of Organization Development (OD) in leadership of organizations. Topics include organizational design; innovation; diagnosing and facilitating healthy organizational change; team building; collaborative leadership; leadership development and succession strategies; and the development of vision, mission and values using large group intervention strategies.

ES 9200 Adult Learning Foundations - 3 Hours

Participants will critically examine selected adult education theories and perspectives in light of Scripture and consider their application to the Christian adult educator's philosophy of educational ministry and practice. Topics include adult development, experiential education, critical educational theory, global models of adult learning, and transformational learning.

ES 9210 Curriculum Theory and Design - 2 Hours

An examination of the guidelines for the development of a coherent curriculum. Discussion of application of curricular theory to religious instruction.

ES 9215 Art, Beauty, and Creativity - 1-2 Hours

The relationship of art, beauty, and creativity to learning from a Christian perspective is the nature of this course. Topics include biblical and theological foundations for art, beauty, and creativity; artfulness and culture making; cultivating the true, good, and beautiful in learning; and image bearing and the creative process in learning.

ES 9250 Modes of Higher Education - 2-3 Hours

An examination of the historic and contemporary higher education modes and/or issues with consideration for the present and future direction of higher education. Models such as Bible colleges, liberal arts colleges, theological institutions, universities, church-based education, online distance education, extensions, and non-traditional modes may be examined. Issues related to the present and future will be considered. Offered on a two to three-year rotation.

ES 9275 Higher Education Administration - 3 Hours

The basic elements of academic administration: faculty resources, student affairs, finance and budget, board and presidential roles, library services, development and public relations. Particular application is made to Christian higher education institutions and to administrative relationships with parent organizations. Offered alternate years.

ES 9280 Assessment in Higher Education - 1-2 Hours

Faculty in higher education are mandated by external stakeholders to demonstrate effectiveness in the classroom and institutionally. Assessment objectives shape classroom curriculum, program outcomes, and institutional ethos. Administrators expect faculty to understand and practice assessment in their teaching and institutional work. Assessment in Higher Education will seek to explicate assessment in the classroom, through program outcomes, and institutional ethos.

ES 9305 Developing Emerging Leaders - 1-2 Hours

Utilizing a scholar-practitioner model, this course will survey and analyze contemporary theory, practices, and processes in developing emerging leaders. A seminar format will be employed, relying on participants' independent research and learning in preparation for class presentations and class discussions. Offered on a two to three-year rotation.

ES 9310 Mid-Career Leadership Development - 2 Hours

This course focuses on the theory, practices, and processes of developing mid-career leaders. Participants will be challenged to personally apply what they learn to their development as a leader. In addition, participants.

ES 9316 Innovation, Agility, and Leading Change - 2 Hours

Participants in this course will explore the theological, theoretical, practical, and contextual aspects of cultivating innovation, designing organizations for agility, and leading change in organizations. Topics include classic and current theories of change; diffusion of innovation; types of organizational change; barriers to change; large system intervention strategies; social intelligence and the management of change transitions; and practical strategies for change implementation. A seminar format will be employed, relying on participants' independent research and learning in preparation for class presentation and class discussions. Offered on a two to three-year rotation.

ES 9330 Developing Collaborative Teams - 1-2 Hours

Participants will explore the theological, theoretical, and practical elements of developing collaborative teams. Topics include teams vs. groups; team selection and formation; building team trust; conflict as creative tension; measuring team effectiveness; and effective team coaching. Offered on a two to three-year rotation.

ES 9500 Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Education - 3 Hours

Through Biblically shaped critical reflection, participants will investigate the psychological and sociological underpinnings of educational theory and practice. Topics include major psychological and sociological theories; primary issues of educational psychology and sociology; and implications for contextualized teaching, learning, and educational practice.

ES 9510 Developmental Issues of Children, Youth, or Adults - 1-2 Hours

Participants will explore current developmental theories and issues related to children, youth, or adults rooted in redemptive image bearing. Topics include family of origin dynamics, learning disabilities, ministry to the whole person, and life transitions.

ES 9620 Education and Culture - 2 Hours

Examines the cultural values shaping Western and two-thirds world education systems. Greek versus traditional cultural value systems, learning styles, forms of logic, language structures, and other major cultural variances are considered with respect to educational function and purpose.

ES 9700 Biblical and Theological Formation of the Educator - 3 Hours

Because God's redemptive sovereignty is creation-wide, all aspects of life have eternal significance. Participants will address the implications of this revealed truth for life and educational ministry by examining Biblical, theological, historical, and contemporary resources. Topics include image bearing agency, vocational stewardship, worldview formation, and theologically shaped education.

ES 9725 Ethics in Education - 3 Hours

An examination of foundational principles in ethical thought, focusing on the source of ethical principles and the need for ethical absolutes. Discussion then focuses on ethical questions in education with emphasis on educational practices and ethics on institutional policies and culture. Offered alternate years.

ES 9750 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education - 3 Hours

Through Biblically shaped critical reflection, participants will investigate the historical and philosophical underpinnings of educational theory and practice. Participants will explore historic and contemporary philosophical streams from major western and non-western resources. Topics include key philosophers and educational theorists; primary issues of educational philosophy; and implications for contextualized teaching, learning, and educational practice.

ES 9890 Professional Development Practicum - 0-2 Hours

Participants design, conduct, and evaluate at least one professional development activity for 0-2 credits. These integrative and generative activities could take the form of teaching, consulting, guest lecturing, conference presenting, developing curriculum, coaching, grant or article writing, etc. All activities must be conducted after EDS PhD program matriculation. Participants normally will have completed 15 credit hours prior to registering for a PDP. One credit hour is equivalent to approximately 35-40 hours of invested practicum work. Potential PDP deliverables include course syllabi, strategic plans, outlines, slides, grant proposals, supervisor/advisor debriefs, reflection logs, articles, presentations, etc. Each EDS student is responsible to initiate conversations toward PDP planning with an appropriate EDS faculty member. Participants may propose non-Trinity or Trinity-related activities and opportunities. Credit/No Credit.

ES 9910 Foundations in Social Science Literature - 3 Hours

Participants will learn to conduct systematic literature reviews of the social science research literature that serve as a theoretical framework for research design. Linkages will be made primarily from sociology, anthropology, psychology, business management, and education to the participants' present research interests. Offered every year.

ES 9915 Social Science Research Design - 3 Hours

The twofold purpose of this course is to engage in theological reflection on the complementary aspects of general and special revelation, and to provide an overview of research design. More specifically, the overview consists of understanding the preliminary considerations that go into selecting a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research design. These include knowing the definition for these different approaches, considering philosophical worldviews, reviewing the literature, understanding the use of theory, anticipating ethical issues, and developing writing strategies. We will discuss the process of research as it relates to each approach. This process includes writing an introduction, specifying a purpose statement, and developing research questions and/or hypotheses. This course will also discuss the methods and procedures for quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods studies. Offered every year.

ES 9920 Qualitative Research Methods - 3 Hours

Prepares the participant to design and conduct fieldwork research in both Christian education and mission communities. Observation techniques and in-depth interviewing are the primary inquiry skills learned in order to discover the individual's perspective. Particular attention is given to the processes of gathering, recording, coding, and analyzing data in order to report rich descriptive findings and conclusions supported by the data. How qualitative research methodology is used to generate "grounded theory" is also examined.

ES 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/EDS program participants may repeat the course twice for a total of three hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ES 9990 Dissertation Proposal Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. PhD/EDS program participants may repeat this course twice for a total of 3 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ES 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Courses taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ES 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.

Mission and Evangelism Course Descriptions

ME 5000 Foundations of Christian Mission - 2 Hours

Survey of the theology, history, culture, politics, and methods of the Christian mission, with special emphasis on recent developments, crucial issues, and future trends, ending with a careful study of missions in the local church. Offered fall and spring.

ME 5001 Foundations of Evangelism - 2 Hours

This course introduces the biblical, theological, historical, and practical foundations of evangelism in word and deed. Students will be equipped to engage others in gospel conversations and prepared to lead churches and Christian organizations to participate in God's mission of reaching their contexts with the good news. Offered fall and spring.

ME 5050 Perspectives on the World Christian Movement - 3 Hours

The course surveys the history, theology, and strategy of the global advance of the gospel. Specific instances of the growth of the Christian movement in selected areas of the world are examined. Perspectives is offered as an occasional course at various locations throughout the year. Contact the Extension Office for details.

ME 6410 History of the Expansion of Christianity - 3 Hours

A study of the expansion of Christianity from Pentecost to the present. Particular attention is given to an examination of the modern Protestant mission movement.

ME 6610 Anthropology for Ministry - 3 Hours

Application of anthropological and sociological insights for ministry in diverse cultural settings, with special attention to fundamentals of culture communication and contextualization. The course will focus anthropological understanding particularly on congregational contexts and ministry.

ME 6760 Theology of Mission & Evangelism - 3 Hours

The many Old and New Testament texts that provide theological foundations for the global mission of the church are examined. Basic issues that confront the missionary will be investigated, as well as the more complex and contemporary issues. The course provides the student with various perspectives and strategies for dealing with the Trinity, the Great Commission, the call and motivation for ministry, and the problems of dialogue, syncretism, universalism, and ecumenism.

ME 6963 Principles of Discipleship - 3 Hours

A practicum with attention given to the way Christian disciples are developed, with practical guidelines for implementing discipleship, both as a personal lifestyle and within the context of the local church. Prerequisite: must have completed at least six semester hours.

ME 7300 World Religions - 3 Hours

Historical survey of the origin and growth of the major world religions, beliefs, practices, and worldviews of the major traditions will be examined, with special attention given to comparison and contrast with Christian beliefs and practices.

ME 7450 Christianity in the Non-Western World Since 1500 - 3 Hours

A broad overview of the significant shift of the center of Christianity from the West to Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The social, cultural, and political context of Western missions, the sending nations, and the receiving nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America will be examined. Consideration will be given to: early modern Roman Catholic missions, the impact of African slavery and Western imperialism, the development of Protestant Christianity, the emergence of independent and indigenous church movements, and the rise of Pentecostalism.

ME 7465 Intercultural Ministries Internship - 1-2 Hours

The MA/ICS Capstone of an applied experience, required for students with limited cross-cultural experience.

ME 7477 MA Major Comprehensive Exam - 1 Hour

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some MA programs. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

ME 7478 MA Project - 0-3 Hours

A department-specific summative program project (MA/E, MA/CM) as arranged with the department of concentration. Not available in all programs.

ME 7485 MA Thesis - 0-3 Hours

MA thesis writers register for ME 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

ME 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for ME 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter.CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

ME 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

ME 7510 Missional Church - 3-4 Hours

This course explores the missional church in light of a theology of God's mission in the world, and post-Christian context. Special attention is given to various streams of missionality, community engagement of the gospel in word and deed, missional communities, disciple-making, discernment, and leadership.

ME 7710 Contextualization - 3-4 Hours

A study of contextualization from theoretical and practical perspectives, examining the relationship of gospel and culture, biblical guidelines, and various methods of contextualization. Students evaluate case studies of contextualization in diverse cultural settings dealing with a wide range of theological, ethical, cultural and ecclesial issues.

ME 7722 Studies in Reconciliation - 2 Hours

In a world marked by deep racial and ethnic conflicts, this course explores the teaching and ministry of reconciliation in the church and mission. It seeks to bridge the gap between theoretical and practical in order to produce serious-minded reflection on the scriptural mandate of reconciliation across racial and other social divides.

ME 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

ME 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

ME 8000 Seminar: Current Issues in Mission and Evangelism - 1-4 Hours

Topics chosen deal with significant issues in mission and/or evangelism. Opportunity provided for seminar discussion and for the presentation of advanced research papers.

ME 8210 Intercultural Communications - 3-4 Hours

This course focuses on the theory and practice of interpersonal communication across cultural lines. Specifically designed for those involved in intercultural ministry, the course focuses attention on language and culture, culture shock, ethnocentrism, paternalism, nonverbal communication, contextualization, and dynamics of change. The focus will, of course, be on the communication of the gospel itself interculturally.

ME 8215 Teaching Across Cultures - 3-4 Hours

An examination of factors contributing to effective teaching and learning when teacher and learners are from different cultures. Cultural influences upon cognitive style, logical processes, worldview, social relations, modes of learning, and learning environments will be analyzed. Implications for teaching in specific cultural settings will be drawn with attention to learning outcomes and cognitive development.

ME 8230 Global Church Planting and Development - 3-4 Hours

This course examines both theologically and practically the planting and development of healthy, reproducing congregations in various cultural settings. Methods, models, strategies, and particular challenges are discussed. Offered annually.

ME 8250 Leadership Development and Culture - 2 Hours

The course will investigate theological, philosophical and anthropological foundations of leadership and culture. These foundational issues will inform the practice of developing multi-cultural leaders and working under leaders from different cultures. Special emphasis will be given to the missionary role of multi-cultural leadership in a world where missionaries from every country of the world are partnering with missionaries and church leaders from every country of the world.

ME 8300 Global Theologies - 3-4 Hours

This seminar examines the roots and current developments Christian theologizing within the context of world Christianity. It seeks to help students explore the nature and methodology of theology in the contemporary world, the effects of cultures and intercultural differences on the theological process and the development of globally informed theology. Students are encouraged to develop an approach to Christian theology that is relevant, orthodox, and creative, and to cultivate a lifelong commitment to scholarship and writing.

ME 8312 Christian Encounter with World Religions - 3-4 Hours

An examination of some historical, theological, and intercultural issues in the Christian encounter with other major religions. Historical approaches by Christian missionaries to Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism will be examined, with special emphasis on implications for such encounters today.

ME 8315 Christian Encounter with Islam - 3-4 Hours

A study of Muhammad, the Qur'an, and the history, culture, and theology of Islam, together with modern trends and its confrontation with Christianity in order to develop appropriate Christian ministries in Muslim contexts.

ME 8320 Anthropology of Religion - 3-4 Hours

An advanced seminar focused on readings in the anthropology of religion. Attention will be focused on anthropological theories of religious experience, religious symbols, myth, ritual, magic, witchcraft, spirit possession, ancestral cults, conversion, and secularization. The class will attempt to assess these theories biblically and to explore their relevance to missiology.

ME 8325 Culture, Ethics, and Social Change - 3-4 Hours

Understanding of human cultural and psychological realities related to culture, ethics, values and social change. This includes topics such as sin, guilt, shame, conscience and morality etc. Cultural and psychological understandings are integrated with biblical and theological understandings to communicate the gospel and disciple believers in a manner which is intelligible, subjectively relevant, and meaningful to people of specific cultures.

ME 8380 Religion in the Modern World - 3-4 Hours

The past three centuries have produced far-reaching social and intellectual transformation, initially in the West and now increasingly worldwide, which have significantly affected traditional religions and also produced an array of new religious movements and alternative spiritualities. Modernization, secularization, globalization, colonialism, and nationalism, as well as various counter-modernizing movements, all have had an impact upon current religious realities. Theoretical issues in the relevant literature, as well as specific application to particular Islamic, Hindu, or Buddhist contexts, will be considered. Implications of these patterns for Christian ministry and mission will be explored.

ME 8390 Gospel, Cultures, and Church in Western Contexts - 3-4 Hours

This course exposes students to the literature and issues related to reaching people, engaging cultures, and rethinking the Church in Western Contexts. Attention will be given to various postmodern and post Christendom historical currents and dynamics affecting ministry and mission today, including pluralism, globalization, secularism, popular culture, ethnic diversity, post colonialism, and the rise of diverse spiritualities. Social science research on the religious development and diversity among emerging adults will especially be emphasized. The gospel will then be examined theologically and historically as it relates to the diversity of spirituality in the modern world. Fresh expressions and innovative leaders of contemporary missional church movements will serve as case studies of this engagement between gospel and cultures in the West.

ME 8450 History of Evangelism - 3-4 Hours

An examination of evangelism throughout the history of the church. Special attention is given to particular Christian movements and personalities, highlighting contributions to gospel proclamation and witness of the church in word and deed. Application of selected practices will be considered for evangelism in contexts today.

ME 8500 Missional Disciple-making - 3 Hours

This course examines the way Christian disciples are formed, with particular attention to biblical and practical foundations for making disciples that include contextual, missional engagement, with the goal of mission in the world. Students examine various models of disciple-making, especially those practiced today within the missional church movement.

ME 8730 Theology of Religions - 3-4 Hours

A doctoral seminar focusing on the biblical and theological understanding of non-Christian religions. Participants will examine the critical issues facing the church in light of biblical teaching and current conflicting ideas and theories regarding human religions. Attention will be given to religious diversity among humans, truth, and salvation in religions.

ME 8815 Ethnicity: Modes of Inquiry and Analysis - 3-4 Hours

Participants in this seminar will employ anthropological and intercultural communication theories and analytical modes as they develop culture-specific taxonomies of ethnic variables, recognize factors that may facilitate communication or trigger conflict, and explore interfaces among theology, ethnicity, and ministry.

ME 8875 Church, Mission, & Community Development - 3-4 Hours

Seminar participants are introduced to the community development literature and critically examine how it relates to the church's responsibility to engage in a mission to the poor that is distinctly holistic-an approach based on Christ's ministry. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of nonformal education in facilitating development. Offered alternate years.

ME 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for ME 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

ME 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-3 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for ME 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

ME 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for ME 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

ME 9000 Contemporary Issues in Intercultural Studies - 4 Hours

Topics chosen deal with contemporary issues in missions. Recent seminars include Cross-Cultural Theology and Intercultural Competencies for Missionaries.

ME 9001 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. Available in all PhD programs. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours in PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS programs; may be repeated for a maximum of six hours in the PhD/THS program. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

ME 9050 Prolegomena: Missiology as a Discipline - 2 Hours

This seminar provides an introduction to the academic discipline of missiology and principles of missiological research and writing. It includes an overview of classical and current publications in the field and an examination of the integrative relationship between theology, history, and the social sciences in Christian mission. Students will also receive an orientation to the TEDS PhD ICS study program.

ME 9085 Global Migration and Diaspora of Faith Communities - 4 Hours

This seminar course will examine historical patterns and current dynamics of global migration, sociologically analyzing contributing factors. In particular, the course will examine how today's growing phenomenon of global migration impacts diaspora religious communities and global missions, identifying both new missional opportunities and concerns.

ME 9146 Urban Evangelism - 4 Hours

The seminar explores critical issues facing the church in light of the rapid urbanization of the world. Among these are how the city shapes our lives as humans and as Christians and how Christians can plant churches and minister in the city. Attention is given to developing a theology of urban ministry.

ME 9260 Teaching Missions and Evangelism in Higher Education - 2 Hours

This course will prepare students for teaching mission and/or evangelism in higher educational settings and will include an introduction to adult learning theory, course design, instructional methods, course evaluation, student relations, and other practical aspects of the teaching vocation.

ME 9325 Sociology for Mission and Evangelism - 4 Hours

An introduction of the field of sociology and the contributions it makes to the discipline of missiology. Attention will focus on issues such as globalization, new religious movements, gender, social capital, communication and media. Theoretical foundations and methodological questions will be introduced, and practical implications for ministry will be explored.

ME 9400 History of the Expansion of Christianity - 4 Hours

A study of major missiological themes throughout the history of the global expansion of the church, with special emphasis on the modern Protestant missionary movement. Writings of exemplary mission historians will be examined for their contribution to our understanding of contemporary trends in world mission practice and strategy. Attention will be given to the missionary encounter with culture in its various historical contexts.

ME 9610 Anthropology for Missions and Evangelism - 4 Hours

An introduction of the field of anthropology and the contributions it makes to the discipline of missiology. The seminar encourages participants to develop a model they can use in studying and ministering in specific societies and cultures. Attention is given to a study of the issues involved in cross-cultural communication, contextualization, and social transformation in evangelism and church planting in cross-cultural settings.

ME 9700 Theology of Mission & Evangelism - 4 Hours

A doctoral seminar focusing on the theology of mission in the Old and New Testaments with special attention to the operation of the Trinity, the missio Dei, the purpose and tasks of mission, church and mission, the nature and necessity of evangelism, historical developments in theology of mission, and current theological issues in Christian mission.

ME 9922 Qualitative Research Methods - 4 Hours

This course teaches various qualitative methods oriented towards intercultural mission and congregational ministry: participant observation, interviewing, how to write field notes, the use of audio and video in field settings, how to 'code' verbal data, and so on. Other topics include ethical issues in research, the place of theory in qualitative research, proposal writing for qualitative research, and recent controversies over how one 'represents' others in one's writings.

ME 9925 Historiographic Research Methods - 4 Hours

An introduction to the principles and practices of historical research within the discipline of missiology. The course with focus on historical methodology, the use and evaluation of primary and secondary sources (including oral history), and the planning and execution of a mission-historical research project.

ME 9930 Quantitative Research Methods - 4 Hours

This course teaches methods of quantitative social science research. This includes topics such as survey design and execution; data collection, management and analysis; use of statistical tools and computer software. The course also addresses the theoretical foundations and ethical guidelines for quantitative research, its application to missiological inquiry, and dissertation proposal writing.

ME 9970 Orientation for Comprehensive Exam and Dissertation - 1 Hour

This course is taught as a workshop addressing the purpose, expectations and methodology of preparing for the comprehensive exam, dissertation proposal, and dissertation writing. It includes class instruction, reading of exemplary field statements and proposals, and active participation in the various oral hearings. Counts as full-time student status when concurrently enrolled for 2 hours of ME 9975 or 6 regular course credit hours, affirms that a total minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in study, and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when the student is concurrently enrolled for 1 hour of ME 9975 or 3 credit hours of regular course work, the registrant affirms that a total minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in study, and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office.

ME 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 1-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/ICS program participants may repeat the course twice for a total of three hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ME 9990 Dissertation Proposal Preparation - 1-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. PhD/ICS program participants may repeat this course twice for a total of 3 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ME 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Courses taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ME 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.

New Testament Studies Department Course Descriptions

NT 4030 Beginning Greek I - 4 Hours

Introduction to phonology, morphology, and grammar of New Testament Greek, with readings in the Johannine literature or the Thessalonian correspondence and vocabulary development. Designed for students with little or no background in beginning Greek. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Offered fall.

NT 4031 Beginning Greek II - 4 Hours

Further study in phonology, morphology, and grammar of New Testament Greek, with readings in the Johannine literature or the Thessalonian correspondence and vocabulary development. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Prerequisite: NT 4030. Offered spring.

NT 4038 Greek Review - 3 Hours

Review of the elements of New Testament Greek, giving special attention to vocabulary, verbal forms and grammar. Prerequisite: a minimum of one year of credible undergraduate Greek with a B average. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Offered fall.

NT 5000 Intro to the New Testament - 3 Hours

Introductory survey of the New Testament, including the life and ministry of Christ, apostolic history, New Testament literature, principal critical issues, and the unity and diversity of New Testament theology. This course meets the NT General Comprehensive requirement for MA students and the English Bible competency requirement for MDiv students, who must meet the SBCT requirement. Not for credit in the MA/NT or MA/OT programs. Elective credit in MDiv program. Auditors are not permitted in General Comp courses unless they have taken previous undergraduate course work in the subject or are not intending to complete the MA program. Offered spring.

NT 5100 English Bible: - 2-3 Hours

Demonstration of inductive Bible study method and treatment of the special teaching of a particular book or books of the New Testament based on the English text. May be repeated for credit as the book studied changes. Not for credit in the MA/NT or MA/OT programs.

NT 5251 Greek Exegesis I - 2 Hours

Study in the use of Greek for the interpretation of the New Testament. Students will review morphological paradigms, expand their Greek vocabulary, survey the theory and practice of lexical semantics, identify proper exegetical methodology, and understand intermediate Greek syntax and grammar. Special attention will be given to the analysis of Colossians 1-2. Students must register for the same section of NT 5251-5252 each semester. Prerequisite: NT 4030-4031 or NT 4038 or a pass on Trinity's Greek proficiency test (usually reflecting two years of undergraduate Greek).

NT 5252 Greek Exegesis II - 2 Hours

Further study in the use of Greek for the interpretation of the New Testament. Students will review intermediate Greek grammar and syntax, survey the theory and practice of textual criticism, strengthen their Greek vocabulary, exegete 1 Peter 1-2, and develop phrasing diagrams of selected passages they exegete. Students must register for the same section of NT 5251-5252 each semester. Prerequisite: NT 5251.

NT 5253 Exegesis for Preaching - 2 Hours

This course, taught by the NT and PT departments, develops skills for interpreting New Testament passages for sermon preparation. Students will review Greek vocabulary, exegete passages from various New Testament genres, relate exegetical analysis to the larger biblical narrative, and develop exegetical outlines and summaries of the biblical texts they study. NT 5253 lays the exegetical foundation for HM 6200/6201. Prerequisites: NT 5000 and NT 5252.

NT 6000 Current Studies in New Testament - 1-4 Hours

Topics selected deal with significant issues related to New Testament studies.

NT 6251 Interpreting the Synoptics and Acts - 3 Hours

A study of the Synoptics and Acts with emphasis on developing the skills necessary to be effective interpreters of these texts. Students will evaluate various critical approaches to the Gospels and to the life of Christ, recognize the historical reliability of the Synoptics and Acts, analyze central theological themes, exegete selected Greek passages, and further refine the methodological skills they learned in NT 5251-5252. Prerequisites: NT 5000 and NT 5252.

NT 6252 Interpreting Paul and General Epistles - 3 Hours

A study of Paul and the General Epistles with emphasis on developing the skills necessary to be effective interpreters of these texts. Students will examine the life, mission, and theology of the Apostle Paul, evaluate the individual letters in their relationship to apostolic history and the life of the church, analyze central theological themes, exegete selected Greek passages, and further refine the methodological skills they learned in NT 5251-5252. Prerequisites: NT 5000 and NT 5252.

NT 6253 Interpreting Johannine Literature - 2 Hours

A study of the Johannine literature with emphasis on developing the skills necessary to be effective interpreters of these texts. Students will evaluate the differences between the Fourth Gospel and the Synoptics, assess the different hermeneutical approaches to Revelation, analyze the theological contribution of each Johannine writing, exegete selected Greek passages, and further refine the methodological skills they learned in NT 5251-5252. Prerequisites: NT 5000 and NT 5252.

NT 7260 Romans - 3 Hours

Stress on the theology of Paul, with consideration of the distinctive emphases of the epistle: Paul's teaching on Judaism, salvation history, the power of sin, righteousness, the Holy Spirit, and the future of Israel. Prerequisites: NT 5251, NT 6252, or concurrent enrollment. Offered alternate years.

NT 7270 Corinthian Correspondence - 3 Hours

Historical background and principal theological emphases of these letters addressed to a first-century Gentile church. Prerequisites: NT 5251, NT 6252, or concurrent enrollment. Offered alternate years.

NT 7395 Hermeneutics - 3 Hours

The science of biblical interpretation with examination and explanation of the various systems of such. Using selected passages of Scripture, the disciplines necessary in biblical interpretation come to be understood and developed.

NT 7477 MA Major Comprehensive Exam - 1 Hour

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some MA programs. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

NT 7485 MA Thesis - 0-3 Hours

MA thesis writers register for NT 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

NT 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for NT 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter.CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

NT 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

NT 7605 Matthew - 3-4 Hours

Examination of the structure and theology of Matthew, with special attention to exegesis of specific passages. Prerequisite: NT 5251. Offered alternate years.

NT 7610 Hebrews - 2 Hours

Stress on the technique and method of book study. The distinctive emphases of the book are considered: the person and work of Christ, the philosophy of history, and the use of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: NT 5251. Offered alternate years.

NT 7710 Intertestamental Period - 3-4 Hours

History of the period from the close of the Old Testament canon in the fifth century B.C. to the time of Christ, with special emphasis on the literature and theology of the period. Prerequisites: NT 6251 or 6252 or concurrent enrollment. Offered alternate years.

NT 7720 Backgrounds Early Christianity - 3-4 Hours

Introduction to primary sources and recent literary finds in Judaism, the Hellenistic religions, and the social history of the early Roman Empire; provides a background for the study of the ministry of Jesus and the life and mission of the early church. Offered alternate years.

NT 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

NT 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

NT 7980 MA Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

MA participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for 7980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a MA capstone research paper (MA/NT). Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded C- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

NT 8000 Seminar: Current Issues - 2-4 Hours

Issues of importance in New Testament history, criticism, interpretation, and theology discussed in a seminar setting.

NT 8210 Lukan Writings - 3-4 Hours

History and theology in the Gospel of Luke and the Book of Acts. Special attention is given to narrative structure. Passages are selected from both books for study in depth. Prerequisite: NT 5251. Offered alternate years.

NT 8220 Revelation and Apocalyptic Literature - 3-4 Hours

This course seeks to study the Book of Revelation from four perspectives: antecedents (the meaning and use of 'apocalyptic' in the ancient world), models (Jewish and Hellenistic apocalyptic works), exegesis (the study of individual texts), and biblical theology (the study of themes in the Book of Revelation). Prerequisites: NT 5251, NT 6251, or concurrent enrollment.

NT 8420 Criticism of the Gospels - 3-4 Hours

Seminar in the contemporary literary and historical approaches to the Gospel narratives and the formulation of a constructive position regarding the synoptic problem, the structure of the Gospel narratives, the composition of the fourth Gospel, and the relation of faith and history. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in NT 6251. Offered alternate years.

NT 8430 History of NT Interpretation - 3-4 Hours

A survey of the history of criticism of the New Testament primarily from the late eighteenth century to the present. Particular emphasis on the development of critical methodologies, relationships between critical approaches and worldview, and evangelical responses to the key movements. Prerequisites: NT 6251 or 6252 or current enrollment. Offered alternate years.

NT 8505 Use of Scripture in Scripture - 3-4 Hours

This course works through representative quotations and allusions from different corpora in order to probe difficult questions surrounding the relationships between the Testaments. Interest centers not only on questions of text and form but on the manner in which earlier texts are handled in later texts and on the diversity of ways in which texts are interpreted, the appropriation of techniques involved, and especially the hermeneutical axioms and warrants that explicitly or implicitly underlie such appropriation. An attempt is made to relate such findings to selected larger issues of biblical and systematic theology, in short, how Christians can have a unified canon, preaching, and teaching from the entire Bible. Prerequisites: NT 5251, NT 6251, or concurrent enrollment.

NT 8610 The Teaching of Jesus - 3-4 Hours

Study in the methods and content of Jesus' teaching with collateral reading in the modern interpreters of Jesus. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: NT 5251, NT 6251, or concurrent enrollment.

NT 8620 Johannine Theology - 2 Hours

Study in the theology of the Johannine literature, including critical appraisal of representative modern works. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: NT 5251, NT 6251, or concurrent enrollment.

NT 8630 Pauline Theology - 2 Hours

Analysis and synthesis of Paul's letters and related documents (e.g., Acts, the Gospels, the Old Testament) with the goal of better understanding his theology as a whole. Includes evaluation of the New Perspective. Prerequisites: NT 6251, NT 6252, or concurrent enrollment. Offered alternate years.

NT 8640 New Testament Theology - 3-4 Hours

Study of the major themes of New Testament theology, the distinctive contributions of the biblical authors, and the issue of unity and diversity within the canon of the New Testament. Pre/concurrent requisites: NT 5251, NT 6251, or 6252 or current enrollment.

NT 8720 Advanced Greek Exegesis - 2 Hours

Intensive exegetical study of a selected book (usually Acts, 2 Corinthians, the Pastoral Epistles, or Hebrews) or series of texts, evaluating the methods and conclusions of representative commentaries in light of recent studies in grammar and textual criticism. Prerequisites: NT 5251, NT 6252, or concurrent enrollment. May be repeated as the instructor varies, register as NT 7501.

NT 8721 Advanced Greek Grammar - 3-4 Hours

Studies in Greek grammar and syntax as they inform New Testament exegesis with special reference to standard grammars and contemporary linguistic discussion. Prerequisites: NT 5252 (with an A- or better); and pre or co-requisite of NT 6251 or 6252. May be repeated as the instructor varies, register as NT 7501.

NT 8722 Septuagint & the New Testament - 2 Hours

History of the version; translation of representative passages; consideration of the Septuagint's influence on New Testament grammar, lexicography, and theology; interaction with past and current Septuagint scholarship. Prerequisites: NT 5252; and OT 5242 or consent of the department chair.

NT 8723 New Testament Textual Criticism - 2 Hours

Analysis of the materials, history, and principles of New Testament textual criticism with application to selected passages. Prerequisites: NT 5252, NT 6251, or 6252 or current enrollment. Offered on demand.

NT 8911 New Testament Research - 2 Hours

An introduction to the primary sources, the secondary literature, and the major issues related to doctoral level New Testament studies. Students will become familiar with the scholarly editions of Hebrew, Aramaic, Latin, and Greek texts of the Old and New Testament as well as of the contemporary literature of the Hellenistic and Greco-Roman period, and with the lexicons, dictionaries, encyclopedias, and commentaries which scholars use in order to translate and interpret these texts. The major issues and methods of New Testament research are introduced in a discussion of the Synoptic Gospels, the Gospel of John, the Book of Acts, Paul's Letters, the Catholic Epistles, and revelation, the history of New Testament research, the history of the early church in the first century, and the theology of the New Testament. Students are expected to read at least Hebrew and Greek, preferably also Aramaic and Latin, as well as French or German. Required course for entering students (does not count as a seminar).

NT 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for NT 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit/No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded "C-" or better to receive credit for the paper.)

NT 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-3 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for NT 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

NT 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for NT 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

NT 9001 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. Available in all PhD programs. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours in PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS programs; may be repeated for a maximum of six hours in the PhD/THS program. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

NT 9011 Private Study - 0 Hours

In special circumstances, a student may register for one or more semesters of Private Study in order to meet the requirements for candidacy. Only for PhD/THS students in CH, NT, OT, ST departments. Counts as full-time student status when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week (half-time is 15 hours per week) are invested in doctoral study and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. May be repeated four times. No Credit.

NT 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/THS program participants may repeat it once. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

NT 9990 Dissertation Proposal Prep - 1-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. PhD/THS program participants may repeat this course once for a total of 3 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

NT 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Courses taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

NT 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.

Old Testament and Semitic Languages Department Course Descriptions

OT 5000 Intro to the Old Testament - 4 Hours

An introduction to the literature of the Old Testament, the history of Israel, critical issues of Old Testament formation, method in Old Testament study, and the theology of the Old Testament. This course meets the OT General Comprehensive requirement for MA students and the English Bible competency requirement for MDiv students, who must meet the SBCT requirement. Not for credit in the MA/NT or MA/OT programs. Elective credit in MDiv program. Auditors are not permitted in General Comp courses unless they have taken previous undergraduate course work in the subject or are not intending to complete the MA program. Offered fall.

OT 5050 Geography of Bible Lands - 3 Hours

Examination of the geography of Bible lands, including an analysis of the physical topography of natural regions and ancient sites, an assessment of political and territorial subdivisions, and a diachronic unfolding of those events that have transpired in the land that lend themselves to geographic explanation. The course will suggest and illustrate how some large blocks of biblical material, as well as several entire canonical books, can be significantly nuanced with historical and theological texture as a result of discerning the spatial dimensions embedded in the text.

OT 5075 Biblical Archaeology - 3 Hours

The relationship between archaeological data and the Old Testament is investigated with special interest in current problems in the field of biblical archaeology, such as the origins of Israel and the United Monarchy. The science of archaeology, fieldwork, and research methods are introduced.

OT 5100 English Bible: - 2-3 Hours

Demonstration of inductive Bible study method and treatment of the special teaching of a particular book or books of the Old Testament based on the English text. May be repeated for credit as the book studied changes. Not for credit in the MA/NT or MA/OT programs.

OT 5240 Elementary Hebrew I - 3 Hours

Essentials of biblical Hebrew grammar with emphasis on morphology, phonology, syntax, and vocabulary. OT 5240-5241 is taught in a sequence. Students must register for the same section both semesters. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Cap 16.

OT 5241 Elementary Hebrew II - 3 Hours

Further consideration of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary with a focus on the Hebrew weak verb. Designed to prepare the advancing Hebrew student for exegetical study by a detailed consideration of Hebrew syntax and the reading of selected texts. Students must register for the same section both semesters. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Prerequisite: OT 5240 passed with a C- or better. Cap 16.

OT 5242 Hebrew Exegesis - 3 Hours

Students will learn how to use Biblical Hebrew for exegetical study of Old Testament texts. Attention will be given to semantics, as well as syntax and structure. The course will focus primarily on the poetics of biblical narrative. The course will introduce the student to basic types of discourse and lay a foundation for the analysis of both narrative and poetry, equipping the student to move from observation and analysis to synthesis. The course will address strategies for moving from text to sermon and making the transition from exegesis to exposition. The course will establish the exegetical foundation for OT 6251. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5241 passed with a C- or better.

OT 6000 Current Studies in Old Testament - 1-4 Hours

Topics selected deal with significant issues related to Old Testament studies. May be repeated for credit.

OT 6251 Interpreting the Pentateuch and Former Prophets - 3 Hours

Building on OT 5242, students will develop exegetical competence in the Pentateuch (Genesis through Deuteronomy) and in the Former Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings). Students will apply learned exegetical methodology to various genres within these books. Working in selected narrative and legal texts, students will examine key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues. May not be audited. Course must be taken in sequence. Prerequisites: OT 5242 or OT 6050; and OT 5000 (with a grade of 'C-' or better) or passing the OT portion of the Standard Bible Content Test.

OT 6252 Interpreting the Latter Prophets - 3 Hours

Utilizing skills acquired in OT 6251, students will further develop exegetical competence in the Hebrew text of the Latter Prophets (Isaiah through Ezekiel, the Twelve, and Daniel). The course will advance the student's understanding of Hebrew poetry, its forms and techniques. Working in selected poetic and narrative texts, students will examine key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues. Students will apply learned exegetical methodology to various genres within these books. May not be audited. Course must be taken in sequence. Prerequisites: OT 6251; and OT 5000 (with a grade of 'C-' or better) or passing the OT portion of the Standard Bible Content Test.

OT 6253 Interpreting the Writings - 3 Hours

Culminating on the skills attained in OT 6251 and OT 6252, students will cultivate increased exegetical competence in the Hebrew text of the poetic books (Psalms, Job, Proverbs, Song of Songs, Ecclesiastes, Lamentations) and post-exilic narrative (Ezra/Nehemiah, Esther, Chronicles). Advanced consideration of Hebrew poetry will facilitate work in selected poetic and narrative texts. Students will examine key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues. Students will apply learned exegetical methodology to various genres within these books. May not be audited. Course must be taken in sequence. Prerequisites: OT 6251; OT 6252; and OT 5000 (with a grade of 'C-' or better) or passing the OT portion of the Standard Bible Content Test.

OT 7090 Old Testament Theology - 3 Hours

A study of the approaches to the theology of the Old Testament in the last century in an effort to engage critically with recent proposals and develop skills for reading the Old Testament theologically.

OT 7420 Ancient Near Eastern Religions - 3 Hours

A comparative study of religions of the ancient Near East, with special treatment of Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Levantine and Israelite traditions. Various religious studies methodologies will be introduced, and sources for studying Ancient Near Eastern religions will be examined. Topics will be studied comparatively with the Israelite traditions, such as cosmology, temples, priests, popular religion and death/after-life.

OT 7430 Origins of Israel - 3 Hours

An investigation of the theories and issues related to the origins of Israel with particular emphasis on the textual sources, archaeological evidences, and anthropological models relevant to the question of historical reconstruction.

OT 7432 Warfare in OT and Ancient NE - 3 Hours

Warfare in the Old Testament and Ancient Near East is examined from ideological, religious, strategic, and tactical perspectives by investigating various textual, artefactual, architectural and iconographical sources. Theological and ethical issues will also be raised by study of pertinent biblical passages.

OT 7435 History of Israel - 3 Hours

An investigation of the study of the history of Israel from the origins of the nation to the end of the period of the Hebrew Bible.

OT 7440 History of the Ancient Near East - 3 Hours

An orientation in the world of the ancient Near East which surveys the social, economic, and political history of that region with emphasis on its relation to the Old Testament. Integrated with this material will be geography, archaeology, and the study of institutions as these contribute to an understanding of ancient Near Eastern history.

OT 7460 Dead Sea Scrolls and the Bibile - 3 Hours

A study of select readings from the Dead Sea Scrolls in Hebrew alongside the archaeological finds from Qumran and first century Palestine. Particular attention is given to the contributions that this corpus makes to biblical studies, textual criticism, and the beliefs and practices of intertestamental and New Testament Judaism, as well a early Christianity. Prerequisite: OT 5242.

OT 7477 MA Major Comprehensive Exam - 1 Hour

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some MA programs. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

OT 7485 MA Thesis - 0-3 Hours

MA thesis writers register for OT 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

OT 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for OT 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter.CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

OT 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

OT 7510 Hebrew Reading Skills - 3 Hours

Guided reading in selected passages to develop facility with Hebrew vocabulary and modes of expression, provide continued review of phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, and improve reading comprehension. May be repeated for credit. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5241.

OT 7610 Biblical Aramaic - 3 Hours

Reading of the Aramaic portions of Daniel 2-7 and Ezra 4-7 and comparison of Aramaic phonology, morphology, and syntax with Hebrew. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5242.

OT 7614 Extrabiblical Aramaic - 3 Hours

Reading of Aramaic papyri and inscriptions from the first seven centuries of the first millennium B.C., as well as selected Aramaic Targums. Comparison of phonology, morphology, and syntax with biblical Aramaic. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5242.

OT 7620 Akkadian I - 3 Hours

Introduction to the Sumero-Akkadian cuneiform script of ancient Babylonia and Assyria and inductive study of the essentials of the grammar. Reading of selections from the Code of Hammurabi, the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Babylonian Creation Epic, and the Neo-Assyrian royal inscription, with comparisons to the Hebrew Bible. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5242. Offered on demand.

OT 7621 Akkadian II - 3 Hours

Continuation of OT 7620. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 7620.

OT 7630 Ugaritic - 3 Hours

Guided reading in selected Ugaritic texts. Study of Ugaritic vocabulary, morphology, and syntax. Linguistic comparison of the language and texts with reference to points of contact with the Hebrew Bible. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5242. Offered on demand.

OT 7640 Syriac - 3 Hours

Introduction to Syriac grammar with limited reading of the Peshitta text of the Old Testament. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5242. Offered on demand.

OT 7650 Sumerian - 3 Hours

An introduction to the early cuneiform script and a study of the Sumerian language and literature in its historical context. A substantial part of the course is devoted to reading selected Sumerian texts from royal inscriptions and other genres. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5242. Offered on demand.

OT 7655 West Semitic Inscriptions - 3 Hours

A study of selected extra-biblical Hebrew, Moabite, Philistine, Ammonite and Phoenician inscriptions according to their epigraphic contexts. Particular attention will be given to issues of genre, culture, religion and history as related to the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisite: OT 5242 or consent of the department chair.

OT 7660 Middle Egyptian - 3 Hours

This is an introductory course on the Egyptian language from the period 2100-1400 B.C. The student will learn to read, transcribe and translate hieroglyphs. The grammar and syntax of Middle Egyptian will be covered as well.

OT 7680 Literature of the Ancient Near East - 3 Hours

A study of literature from the Ancient Near Eastern world with special emphasis on literature that is important for reading the Old Testament in its context. The course will include an informed reading in translation of selected texts in representative genres of literature from the various Ancient Near Eastern cultures. The student will develop a methodology for sound comparison with the corresponding biblical genres. Offered every other year.

OT 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

OT 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

OT 8000 Seminar: Current Issues - 2-4 Hours

Topics chosen deal with significant issues in Old Testament content, history, introduction, and/or interpretation, and seminar discussion and presentation of advanced research papers. May not be audited. Prerequisites determined by seminar topic.

OT 8100 Old Testament Historiography: Issues and Methods - 3 Hours

The course provides an introduction to critical issues, secondary literature, and methods for advanced biblical and theological study of the Old Testament and its world. The course will prepare students for the research and writing of a master?s thesis or doctoral dissertation pertaining to Old Testament literature and history, as well as that of its Ancient Near Eastern milieu. Prerequisite: OT 5242. No auditors.

OT 8150 History of the Hebrew Bible - 3-4 Hours

A study of the textual evidence and theories regarding the compositional growth, progressive canonical development and recognition, and manuscript transmission of the books of the Old Testament from the 15th century B.C. down through the Masoretic period. The course will also consider the issue of intertextual reference and interpretation within the Old Testament and its contribution to our understanding of the historical growth and development of the Hebrew Bible.

OT 8210 Hebrew Exegesis: Genesis - 3-4 Hours

Consideration of the historical, historical-critical, interpretative, and theological issues in Genesis in the context of careful exegesis of selected passages. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5242.

OT 8230 Hebrew Exegesis: Psalms - 3-4 Hours

Overview of the Psalter's structure, major genres, themes, theology, and exegesis of representative psalms. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5242.

OT 8250 Hebrew Exegesis: Isaiah - 3-4 Hours

A text-linguistic study of selected portions of the Hebrew text of Isaiah. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5242.

OT 8720 Hebrew Exegesis: Select Book - 3-4 Hours

Exegesis of selected texts with special attention to relevant theological issues. Attention to the book's structure, central themes, and historical, cultural, and literary contexts may also be included. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: OT 5242.

OT 8723 Old Testament Textual Criticism - 3-4 Hours

Introduction to the textual critical study of the Old Testament and its relationship to other areas of Old Testament study. Consideration is given to the goals and methodology of Old Testament textual criticism and the ancient versions as translations. Analysis of selected texts, comparing the readings of the Masoretic Text with selected ancient versions. Prerequisite: OT 5242. Offered on demand.

OT 8729 Advanced Hebrew Studies: - 3-4 Hours

Study of linguistic, methodological, and historical issues related to the Hebrew language. Course titles include Advanced Hebrew Syntax, Historical Hebrew Grammar, Hebrew Lexicography and Semantics, and Postbiblical Hebrew. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: OT 5242.

OT 8811 History & Archaeology of the Ancient Near East I - 3 Hours

A careful study of the Ancient Near Eastern world with special focus on Mesopotamia and Egypt. The course will survey the cultural, social, economic, and political history of the various regions based on primary source material with special emphasis on relationships to the Old Testament. The course will integrate textual, archaeological, geographical, and institutional resources as these contribute to an understanding of Ancient Near Eastern history and culture. Offered every even year in the fall semester.

OT 8812 History & Archaeology of the Ancient Near East II - 3 Hours

A careful study of the Ancient Near Eastern world with special focus on Syria, Anatolia, Palestine, and Transjordan. The course will survey the cultural, social, economic, and political history of the various regions based on primary source material with special emphasis on relationships to the Old Testament. The course will integrate textual, archaeological, geographical, and institutional resources as these contribute to an understanding of ancient Near Eastern history and culture. Offered every odd year in the spring semester.

OT 8911 Old Testament Studies I: Pentateuch & Former Prophets - 2 Hours

The course provides participants committed to the field of Old Testament studies with a disciplined approach to the language, grammar/syntax, methodology, and rigors of the academic study of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: OT 5242 or OT 6050 (master's); or Hebrew language proficiency (doctoral). Offered each fall. No auditors.

OT 8912 Old Testament Studies II: Latter Prophets & Writings - 2 Hours

The course provides participants committed to the field of Old Testament studies with a disciplined approach to the language, grammar/syntax, methodology, and rigors of the academic study of the Old Testament. Offered each spring. No auditors. Prerequisite: OT 8911.

OT 8950 Old Testament Research and Methods - 3 Hours

The course provides an introduction to critical issues, secondary literature, and methods for advanced biblical and theological study of the Old Testament and its world. The course will prepare students for the research and writing of a master?s thesis or doctoral dissertation pertaining to Old Testament literature and history, as well as that of its Ancient Near Eastern milieu. Prerequisite: OT 5242. No auditors.

OT 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for OT 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

OT 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-3 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for OT 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

OT 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for OT 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

OT 9001 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. Available in all PhD programs. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours in PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS programs; may be repeated for a maximum of six hours in the PhD/THS program. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

OT 9011 Private Study - 0 Hours

In special circumstances, a student may register for one or more semesters of Private Study in order to meet the requirements for candidacy. Only for PhD/THS students in CH, NT, OT, ST departments. Counts as full-time student status when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week (half-time is 15 hours per week) are invested in doctoral study and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. May be repeated four times. No Credit.

OT 9925 Historiography: The Theology of Writing History - 3-4 Hours

This course will focus on the problems of general historiography and consider biblical historiography. Questions of selectivity, literary artistry, point of view, purpose, use of sources, and the author's theology that emerges from these will be studied. Course content will focus on biblical historiography in 1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, and 1-2 Chronicles.

OT 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat the course twice for a total of three hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat it once. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

OT 9990 Dissertation Proposal Prep - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. Only PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat this course twice for a total of 3 hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat this course once for a total of 3 hours. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

OT 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Courses taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

OT 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.

Pastoral Theology Department Course Descriptions

HM 5000 Theology and Methodology of Biblical Preaching - 2-3 Hours

Theological foundations for preaching and sermon preparation with emphasis on biblical integrity and structural soundness. Lecture sessions-must be taken concurrently with HM 5001. Only offered online.

HM 5001 Preaching Lab - 0 Hours

Lab sessions-must be taken concurrently with HM 5000. Only offered online.

HM 5010 Preaching for Partners - 1-2 Hours

This course offers the basics of preaching and encouraging those who preach. Not applicable toward the MDiv degree.

HM 6000 Current Studies in Homiletics - 1-4 Hours

Topics selected deal with significant issues related to homiletics.

HM 6200 Theology and Methodology of Biblical Preaching - 2 Hours

This course lays the biblical and theological foundations for preaching and develops preaching skills with an emphasis on faithfulness, contextualization, clarity, and spiritual power. Successful students will be able to defend a biblical theology of preaching and learn strategies to overcome common pitfalls in preaching. Students will expound two preaching portions from the epistles and receive informed feedback from a professor and peers. Prerequisite: NT 5253.

HM 6201 Preaching Lab - 0 Hours

Lab sessions-must be taken concurrently with HM 6200. Offered Quad B.

HM 6610 Preaching Narrative - 1 Hour

Homiletics laboratory to provide students with opportunities to preach from narrative texts. Introductory lectures will focus attention on the hermeneutical and homiletical demands of that genre. Prerequisite: HM 5000 or HM 6200. Pre- or corequisite (select one): OT 6216, OT 6217, NT 6221, NT 6222. Offered fall and spring.

HM 6620 Preaching Poetry and Prophecy - 1 Hour

Homiletics laboratory to provide students with opportunity to preach from poetic or prophetic texts. Introductory lectures will focus attention on the hermeneutical and homiletical demands of those genres. Prerequisite: HM 5000 or HM 6200. Pre- or corequisite (select one): OT 6216, OT 6217, NT 6221, NT 6222. Offered fall and spring.

HM 6630 Preaching the Parables of Jesus - 1 Hour

Homiletics laboratory to provide students with opportunity to preach from the parables of Jesus. Introductory lectures will focus attention on the hermeneutical and homiletical demands of that genre. Prerequisite: HM 5000 or HM 6200. Pre- or corequisite (select one): OT 6216, OT 6217, NT 6221, NT 6222. Offered fall and spring.

HM 6700 Preaching Biblical Doctrine - 2 Hours

Procedures for the preparation and presentation of sermons based on biblical doctrine. Prerequisite: HM 5000 or HM 6200. Offered on demand.

HM 6710 Hermeneutical Foundations of Preaching - 2 Hours

Study of the principles of hermeneutics in the context of the task of sermon preparation. Special attention given to the interpretation and appropriate application of the various biblical genre. Prerequisite: HM 5000 or HM 6200.

HM 6715 Hermeneutical & Homiletical Foundations of Preaching - 3 Hours

Focus on the hermeneutical and homiletical skills needed to develop biblical sermons with relevance to the urban setting. Offered only at the South Chicago Regional Center.

HM 7000 Preaching from the Old Testament - 1 Hour

This course, team taught by a member of the Old Testament and Pastoral Theology departments, helps students engage in careful exegesis of preaching portions from distinct genres so that the fruit of that careful study can foster faithful exposition. Students review salient characteristics of each genre, read each preaching portion in Hebrew and expound one text, having submitted a detailed exegesis of it. Prerequisites: HM 6200; and OT 5242 or OT 6050.

HM 7210 Expository Preaching of a Biblical Book - 2 Hours

Procedures for handling a biblical book as a unity and planning and presenting a series of sermons on that book. May be repeated. Prerequisite: HM 5000. Offered on demand.

HM 7260 Evangelistic Preaching - 2 Hours

Preparation and presentation of sermons for various evangelistic and conference occasions. Prerequisite: HM 5000.

HM 7280 Preaching on Contemporary Problems - 2 Hours

Using advanced methods, sermons on personal, community, and world problems are prepared and delivered. Prerequisite: HM 5000. Offered on demand.

HM 7315 Preaching and Biblical Theology - 3 Hours

This course provides a teaching space and laboratory to give students tools, models, and opportunities integrating the disciplines of Biblical Theology and preaching. It includes viewing online content delivered by the Charles Simeon Trust and participating in discussions on the content, which are then supplemented with additional readings that focus attention on the exegetical demands of Biblical Theology, specifically concerning how to study for teaching and preaching.

HM 7316 Preaching and Systematic Theology - 2 Hours

This course provides a teaching practice and laboratory to give students tools, models, and opportunities integrating the disciplines of Systematic Theology and preaching. It includes viewing online content delivered by the Charles Simeon Trust and participating in discussions on the content, which are then supplemented with additional readings that focus attention on the exegetical demands of Systematic Theology, specifically concerning how to study for teaching and preaching.

HM 7400 Seminar: History of Preaching - 2 Hours

Biographical and sermonic survey of homiletical and rhetorical theory and of Christian preaching from apostolic times through lectures and research with application to the improvement of preaching in our own time.

HM 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit/No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

HM 8000 Seminar: Current Issues - 1-3 Hours

Seminar discussion and advanced individual research on topics dealing with significant issues in homiletics. Pre or co-requisite HM 5000.

PT 5000 Personal Assessment and Introduction to Ministry - 1 Hour

Designed to assist in personal assessment of character temperament, learning style, talents, abilities and gifts, ministry and relational skills, and other traits relevant to ministry. Based on these assessments, students will develop a personal plan to accomplish their goals through course work and an integrative paper. Should be taken during first or second semester of enrollment. A materials fee will be charged for this course.

PT 5090 Field Education - 0 Hours

Specific subject sections noted below or as arranged with the Director of Field Education. Contact the Field Education Office, or review the online materials for current descriptions of these areas. Prerequisite: Completed Field Education Orientation (a one-hour session offered during the first week of the fall and spring semester; contact the Field Education Office for dates) or have passed the Field Education Orientation Quiz. Once completed, students are cleared for course enrollment in a Field Education course. Repeatable as needed in the program. Credit / No Credit. Subject sections include the following: Academic Teaching (section 1), Adult Education (section 2), Campus Ministry (section 3), Chaplaincy (section 4), Children and Youth Ministries (section 5), Church Planting (section 6, Compassion and Justice Ministries (section 7), Counseling Ministries (section 8), Cross-Cultural (see PT 5095), Discipleship (section 9), Educational Ministries (section 10), Evangelism (section 11), Leadership and Administration (section 12), Media (section 13), Music and Worship (section 14), Pastoral Ministries (section 15), Urban Ministries (section 16), Women's Ministries (section 17)

PT 5095 Field Education: Cross Cultural Ministries - 0 Hours

Contact the Field Education Office, or review the online materials for current description. Credit / No Credit.

PT 5100 Spiritual Formation for Ministry - 2 Hours

For fruitful Christian ministry, it is vital both to know oneself and to know God. This course helps students gain a biblical-theological understanding of how one grows in the knowledge and grace of God through Christ. This course also helps students understand themselves better so as to reflect on their vocational goals. Specifically, students will : 1) understand and engage in a biblical-theology of spiritual formation and sanctification centered on the "means of grace," 2) explore the importance of self-care in ministry in regard to oneself and one's family, 3) with the help of assessment instruments and a personal narrative, reflect on their own strengths, weaknesses and personalities as they pertain to vocational ministry and, 4) develop a Personal and Professional Development Plan. Should be taken during first or second semester of enrollment. A fee for assessments will be charged for this course.

PT 5145 Introduction to Urban Structure and Context - 2 Hours

An examination of the history of urbanization with special attention to recent urban trends. Analysis of urban systems in the metropolitan context, with focus on the dynamics, problems, and opportunities in the central city. Students are challenged to reflect on the implications for ministry and the mission of the church in an urban environment. Offered only at the South Chicago Regional Center.

PT 5150 Introduction to Church Planting - 3 Hours

This course will provide the student with an overview of the theology, theory, and practice of a church-planting ministry. Special attention will be given to a model of evangelism for church planting, to the Pauline cycle, and to contemporary models of church planting. A preliminary assessment component for church planters is also included.

PT 5155 Church Planting Boot Camp - 3 Hours

Church Planting Bootcamp provides an introduction to the major start-up issues the planter faces. The objective is to provide a theological foundation and practical ministry skills that will enable the planter to start healthy, growing, reproducing churches. Four stages of church planting: preparation, conception, development, and birth stage are explored. Offered each May.

PT 6000 Current Studies in Pastoral Theology - 1-3 Hours

Topics selected deal with significant issues related to pastoral theology.

PT 6155 Advanced Church Planting - 2 Hours

Students will investigate church planting from a practitioner's point of view. Particular attention will be given to leadership styles and skills, recruitment and training of leaders, and the integration of church growth principles with the practice of church planting. Prerequisite: PT 5150.

PT 6215 Personal Spiritual Formation for Ministry - 2 Hours

An exploration of the culture and dynamics of spiritual life, with special attention given to the nurture of the inner life through spiritual disciplines and participation in Christian community. The course is designed to promote the leading of an exemplary Christian life amid the pressures of school and ministry.

PT 6300 Intro to Chaplain Ministries - 2 Hours

The course will assist participants in exploring and evaluating various chaplaincy options as full or part-time ministry vocations. Though primary emphasis will be given to military and institutional chaplaincies (hospital, hospice, prison, etc.), other options will also be discussed including corporate, law enforcement, National Park, university, and Civil Air Patrol.

PT 6500 Money and Ministry - 2-3 Hours

This course helps students, ministry staff and pastors grow in sensitivity and knowledge about how to navigate financial challenges common in a variety of ministry settings. The course is designed to be flexible and developmental in nature, since each participant will come to the course with varying levels of financial knowledge, experience, and competency. The goal is to build upon the different foundations each participant will be bringing to the course, and tailor assignments in a variety of ways to help each participant grow in understanding and wisdom.

PT 7225 The Essence of Biblical Leadership - 2 Hours

In recent years the issue of leadership has occupied a great deal of our thinking and attention. There is no shortage of resources and seminars on the subject. To be sure, there needs to be the infusion of fresh, godly, biblical leadership who are filled with the compassion of Christ and who are committed to advancing His Cause. But what is distinctively Christian leadership? What does the Bible teach about leadership? What is the relationship between leadership and our effectiveness in ministry? These and other questions will be addressed in the course.

PT 7250 Christian Worship and Pastoral Practices - 3 Hours

An introduction to Christian worship and the practices of pastoral ministry particularly in the liturgical leadership and pastoral care of the church. The course includes attention to the biblical theology and history of Christian worship, an examination of the interplay between worship and culture, worship styles, worship planning and leadership. The course is designed to: 1) equip students with a biblical theological and historical understanding of Christian worship, 2) develop skills in planning and leading Christian worship that is biblically faithful and culturally engaging, 3) develop basic competency in engaging in select pastoral practices within the church, 4) gain intercultural skill in pastoral practices by better understanding a cultural / context different than their own. Prerequisite; PT 5100.

PT 7410 Denominational History & Polity - 1 Hour

Designed for students seeking a greater understanding of, or anticipating possible placement within, a particular Christian denomination. Attention paid to history, polity, doctrine, missionary outreach, and current trends. This is an independent study course, enabling the student to work with a pastor/ administrator from, and study the history and polity of, a denomination other than the EFCA. To register for course, the student must contact the professor of record to receive clearance. Before registering, the student must select a denominational representative, and the representative must be approved by the professor of record according to TEDS standards for supervision. This class may be taken as an alternative to PT 7412 Comparative Denominational Reading Course, or PT 7415 EFCA History and Polity. Offered every semester.

PT 7412 Comparative Denominational - 1 Hour

Designed for students seeking a greater understanding of two denominations in order to explore and envision how God might use them to serve in ministry, by possibly aligning with one of them. This is an independent study course with attention paid to history, polity, doctrine, missionary outreach, and current trends. To register for course, the student must contact the professor of record to receive clearance to register. Before registering, the student must select two denominations and submit a proposed reading list for comparing them. This class may be taken as an alternative to PT 7410 Denominational History and Polity Reading Course, or PT 7415 EFCA History and Polity. Offered every semester.

PT 7415 Evangelical Free Church History and Polity - 1 Hour

Designed for students seeking a greater understanding of the EFCA or anticipating possible placement within the denomination. Attention paid to history, polity, doctrine, missionary outreach, and current trends. Students are challenged to consider these distinctives in relation to their own concepts of ministry context and potential. Offered fall and spring.

PT 7440 Seminar for Placement - 1 Hour

Seminar designed for senior students who will be seeking placement in various local church ministries. Intended to help students present themselves for greatest possible consideration by prospective churches with an understanding of evaluating appropriate fit in particular ministry settings for long-term fruitfulness. Particular attention paid to ministry transitions and the candidating process. Recommended for students desiring to use the services of the Placement Office. No ThM credit.

PT 7450 Urban Ministry Practicum I - 3 Hours

Focus: urban church education. A practicum that aims to develop skills in structuring Christian education curricula for a particular urban church setting. Opportunities for the student to acquire or increase practical experience and skill in working in, or restructuring, such areas as Sunday school evaluation, curriculum evaluation and selection, and adult education programming with the unique opportunities and problems of the city in mind. Enrollment limited to MA in UM students. Offered only at the South Chicago Regional Center.

PT 7451 Urban Ministry Practicum II - 3 Hours

Focus: organization and administration of the urban programs of the church. A practicum that aims to develop increased skills in management, leadership, and development of leaders. Special attention given to practical organizational and administrative problems in an urban church setting. Enrollment limited to MA in UM students. Offered only at the South Chicago Regional Center.

PT 7452 Urban Ministry Practicum III - 3 Hours

Focus: theology of urban ministries. A practicum that aims to help students develop and reflect upon doctrinal, philosophical, and practical bases for functioning effectively in the city. Enrollment limited to MA in UM students. Offered only at the South Chicago Regional Center.

PT 7471 Urban Ministry Project Design/Research - 3 Hours

Research and design for professional projects involving pastoral ministry and outreach in an urban context. Includes a careful statement of specific project activities, measurable objectives, and evaluation procedures. Prerequisite: completion of all classroom studies in the MA in UM. Offered only at the South Chicago Regional Center.

PT 7472 Urban Ministry Project Report - 3 Hours

Implementation of the project designed in PT 7471, including adjustments as necessary to meet the needs of participants. Prerequisite: PT 7471. Offered only at the South Chicago Regional Center.

PT 7481 Internship I - 1-3 Hours

The internship is a guided ministry experience designed for the formation of pastoral identity under the guidance of ministry mentors and TEDS faculty. Interns are supervised in a ministry context by qualified internship mentors approved and trained by the Office of Supervised Ministries. The office and TEDS faculty from various departments provide formative interactions with interns individually, through written assignments and through the leading of an Internship Huddle. The Huddle includes student discussion with fellow interns and TEDS faculty. Internship Seminars touch on integrative topics crucial to ministerial formation and practice. This course is the first internship experience for MDiv students in the Church and Parachurch Track (may be taken for 2 or 3 hours; 100 hours of field experience required per credit hour) and the only internship option for those in the Academic Track (must be taken for 3 hours). A one-hour option is available for those under a catalog prior to 2017-18. Students enrolled in 3 or more credit hours during any semester of Internship are granted full-time academic status. Prerequisites: MDiv Candidacy, Internship Orientation, and approval from the Director of Supervised Ministries.

PT 7482 Internship II - 1-3 Hours

This course is designed to be the second Internship experience for MDiv students in the Church and Parachurch track (may be taken for 2 or 3 Hours). The course provides an expansion of the student's ministry experience, mentoring from qualified practitioners, and theological reflection in a huddle experience with other Interns and Faculty. One hundred hours of field experience are required per credit hour over a 13-week semester (15 hours per week for 2 hours of academic credit and 23 hours per week for 3 hours of academic credit). This course requires a continuation of the same ministry site and mentor as PT 7481 Internship unless granted an exception by the Director of Supervised Ministries. Students enrolled in 3 or more credit hours during any semester of Internship are granted full-time academic status. Prerequisite: PT 7481 Internship I.

PT 7483 Internship III - 1-2 Hours

This course is for Church and Parachurch track MDiv students fulfilling their Internship requirements over three semesters. It is normally fulfilled in the same ministry setting where the students completed their prerequisite PT 7481 and PT 7482 Internships. It can only be fulfilled in a different ministry setting than the PT 7481 and PT 7482 ministry if the new ministry setting is cross-cultural for the student and permission has been granted by the Director of Supervised Ministries. Students enrolled in 3 or more credit hours during any semester of Internship are granted full-time academic status. Prerequisites: PT 7481 and PT 7482.

PT 7484 Intensive Internship - 3-6 Hours

This course is for Church and Parachurch track MDiv students fulfilling their entire six hours of Internship requirements in one semester. This option is for extraordinary cases only and requires approval from the Director of Supervised Ministries. Extraordinary circumstances may include: 1) an intensive and immersive cross-cultural ministry setting; or 2) a full-time post-seminary pastoral residency program. Students will work in a single ministry setting for 45-50 hours per week for 13-15 weeks. Considered full-time academic status. Prerequisites: MDiv Candidacy, Internship Orientation, and approval from the Director of Supervised Ministries.

PT 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

PT 7710 Maintaining Unity & Purity in the Church - 3 Hours

This course explores the nature of the unity of the church and its grounding in the triune nature of God and his reconciling work in Christ. Specifically addressed are issues of unity between churches (ecumenicity); multiethnic, intergenerational, socio-economic, and gender unity in the church; and doctrinal and moral dimensions of the unity of the church.

PT 7720 Perseverance, Assurance & Ministry - 3 Hours

This course is a study of the soteriological issues of the perseverance of the saints and the assurance of salvation and their impact on pastoral ministry. Topics to be considered will include biblical and theological frameworks for understanding these doctrines, the goal of pastoral ministry in light of these doctrines, preaching, especially from the warning passages of Scripture, pastoral care, especially in times of suffering, dealing with doubt, discipleship of believers at various points in their spiritual journeys, and evangelism and the offer of assurance.

PT 7722 Developing a Healthy Congregational Culture - 2 Hours

This course will explore a topic that is critical in the life of the church and yet is often overlooked: the formation of a congregational culture. In various ways, congregational culture impacts the shaping of the identity, mission, and spiritual formation of all local churches. However, the formation of the congregational culture becomes even more critical when a congregation is facing the challenge of forming or maintaining generational, ethnic, or socio-economic class diversity. In this course, we will seek to understand what congregational culture is, why it is so essential in the formation of a healthy church, and how it is formed.

PT 7724 Ministry in Under-Resourced Communities - 3 Hours

This course aims to equip students with biblical motivation and strategies for serving those who are in need in their communities. There are three course objectives, each of which involves the student developing a desire and ability to answer effectively the following three questions: (1) Do Christians and their churches have a responsibility to help meet not only the spiritual but also the material (social, economic, political) needs of people? (2) How can Christians respond to particular contemporary challenges such as those posed by family breakdown, the media, business, racism and poverty? (3) What means of structural change can be pursued by Christians today?.

PT 7820 Developing Asian American Min - 2 Hours

Given the Asian American church's unique socio-cultural setting and the particular set of challenges it faces, how should it care for its people and carry out its mission to the world? This course will examine the Asian American church experience from historical, sociological, and theological perspectives and then explore some of the models/approaches of ministry that might be appropriate for this particular context.

PT 7842 Understanding the Urban World - 2 Hours

The main focus of the course will be on modern and postmodern patterns of urbanization. Urban systems will be analyzed in their metropolitan as well as global contexts, and special attention will be given to the social, cultural, and economic restructurings that are taking place within the city. The student will be continually challenged to reflect on the unique ministry and mission implications that the urban context poses for the whole church.

PT 7848 Ministry of the Urban Church - 2 Hours

Through the lens of a biblical understanding of the church and its purposes, this course will examine the urban environment, with focused attention on the central city, the poor, and ethnic/minority communities as a context for ministry. The special needs in these contexts will be examined and related to the ministry challenge of the local church. The ministry task of the local church will in turn be examined in terms of the pastoral leadership role, including the personal dimensions of the minister's life and preparation, as well as the actual practice of ministry.

PT 7860 Social & Cultural Exegesis - 2-3 Hours

This course seeks to equip the student to critically analyze the social and cultural context of today's changing world from a biblical and theologically informed perspective. Special attention will be given to the social processes that have historically shaped our culture, from the post-1800s urbanization to postmodernism. The course will then seek to help the student to understand the dialectic relationship between the church and its surrounding culture/society and the church's prophetic call to be a change-producing agent.

PT 7870 Ministry of Mercy & Justice - 2 Hours

To equip students with biblical motivation and strategies for serving those who are in need in their communities. There are three course objectives, each of which involves the student developing a desire and ability to answer effectively the following three questions: (1) Do Christians have a responsibility to help meet not only the spiritual but also the material (social, economic, political) needs of people? (2) What means of structural change, if any, are allowable and most appropriate for Christians today? (3) How can Christians respond to particular contemporary challenges such as those posed by family breakdown, the media, business, racism and poverty?.

PT 8000 Current Issues - 2-3 Hours

Seminar discussion and advanced individual research on significant issues in pastoral theology.

PT 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for PT 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

PT 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-3 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for PT 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

PT 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for PT 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

Biblical and Systematic Theology Department Course Descriptions

ST 5201 Theology I: The God of the Gospel - 3 Hours

This course establishes the foundations for systematic theology, reflecting upon the triune God and the God-world relation. It introduces theological methodology and treats the doctrines of general and special revelation, particularly that of Holy Scripture. The course also engages theology proper (the divine perfections and personal attributes of the Holy Trinity) and the works of God in creating and providentially caring for the cosmos, including humans.

ST 5202 Theology II: The Gospel of God - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the gospel, the economy of salvation, the incarnation of the Son, and the Holy Spirit. The course begins by treating the human condition as now fallen, and sin as the backdrop of the gospel. Attention then turns to the work of Christ, particularly the atonement and accomplishment of redemption as the content of the gospel. The course then considers the application and consummation of redemption by examining the work of the Holy Spirit, the nature, mission, and destiny of the church as the gathered people of God as the climax of the gospel. The course concludes with a consideration of how the gospel story ends, for believers and unbelievers in the glory of God's being all in all in the new heaven and the new earth. Prerequisite: ST 5201.

ST 7200 Theological Ethics - 3 Hours

This course is an examination of how Christian ethics moves from biblical and systematic theology to moral theology and how theological commitments (e.g., theology proper, anthropology, Christology, soteriology, pneumatology, ecclesiology) structure and govern moral reflection. It explores the application of a robust, moral-theological framework to issues of contemporary personal, pastoral, and societal importance (such as personhood and human dignity, biomedical technologies, sexual ethics, and the pursuit of peace, justice, and reconciliation). Prerequisites: ST 5201 and 5202.

ST 7395 Hermeneutics - 3 Hours

The science of biblical interpretation with examination and explanation of the various systems of such. Using selected passages of Scripture, the disciplines necessary in biblical interpretation come to be understood and developed.

ST 7477 MA Major Comprehensive Exam - 1 Hour

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some MA programs. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

ST 7485 MA Thesis - 0-3 Hours

MA thesis writers register for ST 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

ST 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for ST 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter.CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

ST 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

ST 7505 Use of Scripture and Theology - 3 Hours

This course examines the manifold ways in which theologians, ancient and modem, evangelical and non-evangelical, Western and non-Western, view and especially use Scripture to formulate theological proposals, with regard both to Christian doctrine and practice. The course compares prominent schools of interpretation within the broader theological landscape and constructively suggests ways to extend the logic of Scriptural teaching into contemporary contexts. The twin questions, 'What does it mean to be biblical?' and 'How ought biblical authority actually work?' are addressed by developing an account of how the ancient biblical writings that comprise Scripture (divine discourse) generate and govern contemporary theological understanding and practice. Several case studies are employed to help students learn how to move from biblical exegesis to systematic theological reflection, and thus to become self consciously evangelical theologians who know how rightly to handle the word of truth.

ST 7715 Political Theologies - 3-4 Hours

A course designed to clarify what constitutes a 'political theology' and to investigate the biblical and theological bases of representative political theologies. Discussion focuses around such systems as liberation theology, black theology, and feminist theology.

ST 7911 Colloquium in Systematic Theology - 1 Hour

Integrative seminar for all students majoring in theology on various topics of contemporary concern. May be repeated. Credit / No Credit.

ST 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

ST 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

ST 7980 MA Major Research Paper - 0-2 Hours

MA participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for ST 7980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a MA capstone research paper (MA/PR). Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded C- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

ST 8000 Seminar: Current Issues in Theology - 2-4 Hours

Lectures or seminar in a distinctive area of biblical or systematic theology; topics chosen in relation to the special competence of resident and visiting faculty, as well as current interests and needs.

ST 8030 The Problem of Evil - 3-4 Hours

An examination of one of the traditional problems for Christian theism. After initially clarifying the nature of this attack against theism, discussion turns to different defenses and theodicies offered in response to this problem. Treatment will cover the problem in both its logical and evidential forms.

ST 8100 Essentials of Reformed Theology - 3 Hours

This course delves into a particular theological tradition rather than a single doctrine ? the Reformed. A single guiding question generates and governs the course contents and its conversation partners: ?What makes Reformed theology distinctly Reformed?? We approach this overarching question, much as one would a summit, by exploring various paths of ascent: textual, contextual, historical, hermeneutical, doctrinal, conceptual, ideological, confessional, and comparative.

ST 8101 Karl Barth as Theological Interpreter of Scripture - 3 Hours

A critical analysis of the origins, developments, and major contours of Barth's theology from his earliest writings to his later Church Dogmatics through an inductive study of selected primary texts and interaction with key secondary sources. Special attention is given to Barth's theological method, hermeneutics, and doctrine of the Word of God, as well as to other central theological topics (e.g., election, providence, the relation of dogmatics to ethics). Barth's ideas are examined in the context of his life, the larger historical and intellectual context of his world, and the contemporary theological situation.

ST 8102 Analytic Theology - 3 Hours

This course provides an overview of one of the most important recent developments in theology, namely, analytic theology. This is an approach to theology that borrows ideas, concepts, and methods from analytic philosophy. The course begins with an introduction to the history and nature of analytic theology and then examines core Christian doctrines as they have been recently discussed by analytic theologians. This course is intended to provide students with the resources for developing their own evaluation of the fruit of analytic theology as it pertains to Christian faith, practice, and ministry.

ST 8103 Bonaventure - 3 Hours

Bonaventure was a major thinker within the landscape of 13th century Latin scholasticism. Due to his appointment as minister general of the Franciscan order, Bonaventure also became an important writer in the areas of pastoral care and devotional or mystical literature. This seminar surveys Bonaventure's theological contributions, with special attention paid to sustained engagement with primary texts.

ST 8104 Anselm and the Victorines - 3 Hours

Anselm is widely viewed as the first great scholastic thinker of the so-called middle ages. His influence is also extensive among medieval appropriations of Augustine's theology. This class engages major texts from Anselm's corpus, and explores dimensions of his influence by also investigating major works by Hugh and Richard of St. Victor.

ST 8105 Arminius and Arminianism - 3 Hours

This course is a seminar on the theologies of Jacob Arminius, the Dutch Remonstrant movement, and later English "Arminianism." It is a seminar in historical theology; while neither the social historical contexts nor the possibilities of "retrieval theology" will be ignored, our first task is to understand these various theological proposals within their respective intellectual contexts of Protestant scholasticism and early modern theology/philosophy. Major doctrinal issues, including the divine Trinity and attributes, Christology, hamartiology, and soteriology, are explored in detail.

ST 8106 God: Present and Hidden - 3 Hours

This course is two-pronged: exploring both God's hiddenness or absence and God's presence. First, it explores the question of divine hiddenness. The philosophical, yet very practical and even existential, question of why God does not make himself more known to humans. This question, at times, forms the basis for an argument to atheism and this course addresses this question from philosophical, theological, and biblical perspectives. Second, as a counterbalance to God's purported hiddenness and/or absence, this course explores the ways that God is present in the world. Under this rubric, we examine divine action in the world related to providence and miracles; God's presence in theophanies; the divine attribute of omnipresence; God's presence in "Emmanuel" (that is, God Incarnate, Jesus Christ); and God's presence through intermediary means such as the Lord's Supper. Not resting with purely academic answers to these questions, this course also pushes us to think more deeply about how to minister God's presence in our contemporary ministry settings.

ST 8107 Social Ethics - 3 Hours

A seminar focusing upon Christian approaches to social ethics from a diversity of vantage points and in relation to a variety of topics (e.g., economic injustice, race and ethnicity, education funding, healthcare access, housing and incarceration policy).

ST 8200 Seminar: Current Issues in Theology (eligible for 3rd MDiv Requirement) - 3 Hours

Lectures or seminar in a distinctive area of biblical or systematic theology with special relevance to pastoral ministry; topics chosen in relation to the special competence of resident and visiting faculty,as well as current interests and needs. Unlike ST 8000, this course can be used to fulfill the 3rd required class in ST for the MDiv curriculum.

ST 8210 Divine Action and the Doctrine of Providence - 3 Hours

This course surveys the history of the doctrine of divine providence and identifies key issues before attempting a dogmatic account. Special attention is given to the concept of divine action, especially with reference to science and metaphysics. The concern is to articulate, in accordance with the Scripture, what we may hope. The central focus is God's care for individuals, church, and cosmos.

ST 8211 God in Biblical Theology and Systematic Theology - 3 Hours

This course on the doctrine of God has four interrelated aims: (1) to become acquainted with classical and contemporary approaches to Christian theism and assess their faithfulness to Scripture (2) to examine current approaches to the relationship of biblical and systematic theology (3) to learn to identify and interpret figurative language used to speak of God (e.g., metaphors, analogies, anthropomorphisms) (4) to bring all of the above to bear on the question of divine im/passibility. The course thus focuses on how we move from biblical to theological language to speak of God and formulate a doctrine of God and the nature of his relation to the world, with special attention to the issue of divine suffering.

ST 8212 The Doctrine of the Trinity: Classical Formulations and Contemporary Issues - 3 Hours

A study in the biblical sources, classic formulations, and theological issues that are important in the doctrine of the Trinity. Classical formulations, in ecumenical creeds as well as major patristic, medieval, and early modern (Protestant scholastic) theologians, are studied within their historical contexts, and important movements in modern and contemporary theology are studied against the backdrop of these historic statements.

ST 8213 Models of Sanctification - 3 Hours

A course involving a biblical and theological investigation of several models of sanctification held within Christian movements and denominations. Emphasizes understanding of each model, as well as encouraging students to develop their own biblically based model capable of implementation within a ministry context.

ST 8214 Justification - 3-4 Hours

This course considers the biblical and theological foundations of this doctrine. It explores these foundational elements incorporating a historical perspective. Influential thinkers will be studied in the flow of important eras in the Church ranging from the time of Augustine to contemporary discussions. Recent conversations between members of the Protestant camp and Roman Catholics on justification, as well as on the New Perspective, will be engaged.

ST 8215 Pneumatology - 3-4 Hours

A study of the person and work of the Holy Spirit, including a defense of His deity and personality, his work in the Old Testament, the life of Christ, and the New Testament era, as well as discussion of contemporary issues related to this doctrine, such as tongues, divine healing, and prophecy.

ST 8220 Christology: Classical Formulations and Contemporary Issues - 3 Hours

A study in the biblical sources, classic formulations, and theological issues that are important in the doctrine of Christ. Classical formulations, in ecumenical creeds as well as major patristic, medieval, and early modern (Protestant scholastic) theologians, are studied within their historical contexts, and important movements in modern and contemporary theology are studied against the backdrop of these historic statements.

ST 8221 The Doctrine of the Atonement: Classical Formulations and Contemporary Issues - 3 Hours

A study in the doctrine of the atonement in light of its biblical foundations, classical elaborations, and contemporary appropriations.

ST 8222 Theologies of the Sacraments/Ordinances - 3 Hours

This course introduces a theological approach to a variety of church practices that sometimes fall under the heading of sacraments or ordinances. Central to this course is an examination of the biblical and theological underpinning to such practices as Baptism and the Eucharist. This course also introduces theological resources for addressing additional doctrinal issues touching such topics as ordination, marriage, preaching, and death. Moreover, students will work toward bridge-building from the conceptual theological discussion of these issues to the practical manifestation of these practices in the life of the church.

ST 8223 Theologies of Prayer - 3 Hours

This is a course involving a biblical and theological investigation of prayer. Oftentimes restricted to an issue of "practical theology" prayer is a provocative locus for discussion of a number of key systematic theological issues such as providence and human responsibility; God's relation to time, creation, and humans; sanctification; worship; and others.

ST 8310 Theology of Augustine - 3-4 Hours

Augustine stands as a foundational thinker in Roman Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox traditions. He was a critical thinker at a critical time in the life of the Church. This course will consider the life and times of Augustine as informing elements in his theological development. Some of his best known works will be read and discussed to identify particular theological stances. These stances were also affected by what he saw as specific challenges to biblical faith arising from movements, such as Manichaeism, Donatism, and Pelagianism.

ST 8360 Karl Barth - 3 Hours

A critical analysis of the origins, developments, and major contours of Barth's theology from his earliest writings to his later Church Dogmatics through a study of selected primary texts. Special attention will be given to Barth's theological method, hermeneutics, and doctrine of the Word of God, as well as to other central theological topics (e.g., election, providence, the relation of dogmatics to ethics).

ST 8390 Recent & Contemporary Theologians - 3-4 Hours

Lectures or seminar in the work and writing of an important theologian of the present or recent past. Theologians selected for study reflect the special competence of resident and visiting faculty.

ST 8410 Theology in Contemporary Literature - 3 Hours

Works by authors such as Melville, Dostoevsky, Conrad, Shaw, Beckett, Updike, Lewis, Tolkien, Eliot, Auden, Williams, Fry, Buder, Joyce, Camus, Kafka, Faulkner, Salinger, and MacDonald are read and analyzed, and their theological perspective and implications are discussed. Offered on demand.

ST 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for - 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

ST 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-3 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for ST 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

ST 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for ST 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

ST 9001 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. Available in all PhD programs. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours in PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS programs; may be repeated for a maximum of six hours in the PhD/THS program. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

ST 9011 Private Study - 0 Hours

In special circumstances, a student may register for one or more semesters of Private Study in order to meet the requirements for candidacy. Only for PhD/THS students in CH, NT, OT, ST departments. Counts as full-time student status when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week (half-time is 15 hours per week) are invested in doctoral study and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. May be repeated four times. No Credit.

ST 9100 Advanced Theological Prolegomena - 3-4 Hours

A course designed to explore the integrative character of Christian theology, focusing the contributions of the separate theological disciplines on the constructive and creative task of Systematic Theology. Students are encouraged to develop an approach that is integrative, orthodox, and creative, through the critical assessment of the theological proposals of evangelical and nonevangelical theologians. To be taken concurrently ST 9110. Offered fall.

ST 9110 The Theological Scholar - 2 Hours

An orientation to doctoral-level scholarship (the development of an argument, research philosophy and methodology, good writing skills, dissertation preparation), to program specifics, and to the doctoral community life and ethos. It will also include papers presented by four professors, one from each of the THS departments, to illustrate and generate discussion about "theological integration." Must be taken in conjunction with DST 9100 (Advanced Theological Prolegomena) in the first semester after matriculation. Required of all PhD/THS students.

ST 9222 Principles of Higher Education - 2 Hours

A discussion of the educational process, activities, and the instructional techniques used in higher education. Offered spring.

ST 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat the course twice for a total of three hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat it once. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ST 9990 Dissertation Proposal Prep - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. Only PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat this course twice for a total of 3 hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat this course once for a total of 3 hours. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ST 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Courses taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ST 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.

Bioethics

BE 5000 Introduction to Bioethics: Matters of Life and Dignity - 3 Hours

An overview of the ethical issues in healthcare and biotechnology that make up the field of bioethics. Biblical-theological and other prominent contemporary perspectives are developed and assessed. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 5001 Foundations for Integrative Thought in Bioethics - 3 Hours

This course surveys the Bible from the standpoint of its unfolding history of creation, fall, redemption, and restoration, with special attention to scriptural applications of ethical thought and ramifications for ethical behavior. The course considers how precedents, themes, truths, and strategies that established God's will in earlier times provide direction for God's people today. Students will practice interpreting Scripture responsibly and thinking creatively about current bioethical issues in the light of biblical principles. Offered face to face at the Deerfield and Florida campuses.

BE 5002 Foundations for Cultural Engagement in Bioethics - 3 Hours

This course introduces the student to pivotal Christian doctrines as a framework within which to evaluate the working ethical assumptions of contemporary culture. In addition to investigating several models for Christian engagement with culture, the course encourages the positive formation of a Christian worldview as a foundation for wise interaction with contemporary thought in bioethics. Offered online, and face to face at the Deerfield and Florida campuses.

BE 5100 Intensive Bioethics Institute - 3 Hours

This course is a survey of the field of bioethics, introducing competing ways of addressing bioethical issues from historical, philosophical, and theological perspectives. An international team of top Christian bioethicists will address particular areas of expertise. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 5200 Research Ethics - 2 Hours

The application of critical and ethical thinking to the philosophy and professional practice of scientific research. Students will assess the historical framework as well as the current standards and policies (national and international) for human subject research. Topics covered will include risks and benefits, informed consent, vulnerability, privacy, and confidentiality. Offered online and face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 5299 The Clinical Context - 1 Hour

An explanation of basic precepts of clinical medicine and clinical ethics for students not already familiar with them. Designed to be taken concurrently with BE 5300 by students who need to gain this background understanding in order to be able to understand the material covered in BE 5300. Offered as a guided study.

BE 5300 Clinical Issues in Bioethics - 2 Hours

Methods of clinical ethics consultation plus in-depth analysis of specific issues in clinical ethics, including resuscitation, assisted ventilation, management of patients with brain damage, and more. Offered as a two-hour course for students familiar with basic precepts of clinical medicine and clinical ethics. Students lacking this familiarity should take BE 5299 concurrently with this course. Offered online and face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 5400 Nursing Ethics - 2 Hours

This course is designed to prepare nurses for the ethical issues they will encounter in daily practice. Good caregiving, the changing face of health care resulting from globalization, increasing diversity, expanding use of technologies, and limited financial and other resources are among the challenges addressed.

BE 5499 The Public Policy Context - 1 Hour

An explanation of basic federal and state governmental structures and legislative processes for students not already familiar with them. Designed to be taken concurrently with BE 5500 by students who need to gain this background understanding in order to be able to understand the material covered in BE 5500. Offered as a guided study.,An explanation of basic federal and state governmental structures and legislative processes for students not already familiar with them. Designed to be taken concurrently with BE 5500 by students who need to gain this background understanding in order to be able to understand the material covered in BE 5500. Offered as guided study.

BE 5500 Bioethics and Public Policy - 2 Hours

The interface of bioethics and public policy in North American and international contexts, with special attention to religious perspectives in the public square; important cases and bioethics commissions; and other documents. Students will have the opportunity to create a public policy strategy. Offered as a two-hour course for students familiar with basic federal and state governmental structures and legislative processes. Students lacking this familiarity should take BE 5499 prior to, or concurrently with this course. Offered online and face-to-face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 5600 Law and Bioethics - 2 Hours

Questions such as the proper role of law in shaping people's bioethical views and practices and the current state of the law regarding a wide range of bioethical issues are addressed by a legal educator with the help of case discussions. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 5700 The Right to Life & the Law - 2-3 Hours

A study of the complex medical, social, legal, and bioethical issues raised by such controversial topics as abortion, euthanasia, infanticide, and related issues involving rights conscience, including a survey of Supreme Court and other judicial decisions pertaining to these issues. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 5800 Contemporary Issues in Bioethics - 1-3 Hours

Trinity hosted bioethics workshops provide a unique opportunity to explore emerging issues in contemporary bioethics through topical workshops led by an interdisciplinary team of Christian leaders in bioethics from around the country and beyond. This course includes a pre-workshop reading program and post-workshop assignments tailored to the topics of the workshop. Special emphasis is given to the professional dimensions of the issues under consideration, as well as an examination of the evolving academic literature. May be repeated for credit. Offered face to face at the Deerfield Campus.,Trinity hosted bioethics workshops provide a unique opportunity to explore emerging issues in contemporary bioethics through topical workshops led by an interdisciplinary team of Christian leaders in bioethics from around the country and beyond. This course includes a pre-workshop reading program and post-workshop assignments tailored to the topics of the workshop. Special emphasis is given to the professional dimensions of the issues under consideration, as well as an examination of the evolving academic literature. May be repeated for credit.

BE 5900 Bioethics National Conference - 2-3 Hours

The annual national/international bioethics conference at Trinity provides a unique opportunity to learn from and interact with Christian leaders in bioethics from around the country and beyond. The course includes a preconference reading program and post-conference writing program tailored to the topic of the conference. Class meetings with the professor immediately precede and are interspersed throughout the conference. May be taken in addition to an Institute course such as BE 5100 or BE 6500 offered in conjunction with the conference. Cannot be taken as a Guided Reading Course. May be repeated for credit. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 6100 Bioethics Colloquium - 1-2 Hours

The colloquium meets periodically during the term, with a professor of record and a combination of visiting lecturers, faculty, and student presentations. Local pastors, physicians, and others are invited to attend, offering a meeting point between the program and church and medical communities. May be repeated for credit. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 6300 Bioethics, Human Dignity, and the Church - 2-3 Hours

Issues in bioethics raise fundamental questions of human dignity in the lives of people everywhere, to which the church is uniquely well positioned to speak. This course enables students to understand many of today's bioethical challenges to human dignity and to develop practical ministry resources to address them through the preaching, teaching, worship, counseling, and outreach ministries of the church. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 6400 Readings in Bioethics - 2-3 Hours

Readings in bioethics from Hippocrates through the beginning of the modern bioethics period in Fletcher and Ramsey and on to the present. Readings in the earlier periods focus on the birth and development of the Hippocratic/Judeo-Christian tradition. Readings in the contemporary bioethicists place special focus on the secularization of bioethics as seen in such writers as Singer, Engelhardt, and Childress. The course may focus on either classical or contemporary readings. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 6500 Advanced Bioethics Institute - 3-4 Hours

A methodological investigation of how to do bioethics with a range of approaches critically assessed from a biblical-theological perspective. A national/international team of top Christian bioethicists address special areas of expertise. Cannot be taken as a Guided Reading course. Prerequisite: BE 5000 or BE 5100. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 6600 Classic Cases in Bioethics - 3 Hours

Many of the major issues in bioethics have been shaped by pivotal medical and legal cases. The course examines those cases in detail and uses them as a springboard for understanding the larger ethical issues that they address. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 6700 Personhood in Theological & Philosophical Perspective - 3 Hours

Analysis of the role played by this key concept in bioethical debate against the background of philosophical and theological usage. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 6800 Global Health and Justice - 2-3 Hours

An overview of biblical, theological and philosophical approaches to justice, and an overview of justice issues in global health and medicine. Topics to be explored include, for example: globalization and infectious diseases, pharmaceuticals and justice, women's health, Malthusianism in global health policy, rationing and resource allocation in the low resource environment, cancer and care for an aging world, biotechnologies and hunger, medical and ethical problems in short term missions, bioethics in a world lacking global consensus, and the role of the Church when internal policies fail a population's citizens.

BE 7300 Advanced Clinical Ethics - 1-3 Hours

This course will engage students in the process of doing ethical analysis in group discussion and in writing ethics consultation reports on specific cases typically encountered by a consultant in clinical ethics. Two prerequisites: BE 5300; plus either BE 5000 or BE 5100. Students without clinical/medical experience must obtain the professor's permission before registering. Students without BE 5000/5100 can ask the professor to waive that prerequisite. Offered online.

BE 7476 Bioethics Capstone Exam - 0 Hours

A comprehensive examination scheduled by the student with the program director consisting of broad essay questions that allow the student to demonstrate a grasp of the field as a whole. Students should register for this capstone option in the semester they plan to take the examination.

BE 7478 Bioethics Capstone Project - 0-3 Hours

Independent study culminating in a bioethics-related project, as arranged with the program director or designate. Students should register for this course the semester they start the project.

BE 7480 Bioethics Capstone Integrative or Major Paper - 0-3 Hours

Independent study culminating in a bioethics-related project, as arranged with the program director or designate. Students should register for this course the semester they start the project.

BE 7485 MA Thesis - 0-4 Hours

MA thesis writers register for BE 7485. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal, and other department specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time student status. Letter grade or Credit/No Credit as arranged with the department. (Formerly BE 790)

BE 7486 Bioethics Capstone Extension - 0 Hours

This course is taken when an extension has been granted beyond one semester for progress toward completion of the capstone (other than the examination capstone). For the thesis option only, this counts as half-time student status when registrant affirms that a minimum of twenty hours per week is invested in the capstone. Capstone Extension fee required when not enrolled in other courses. No Credit.

BE 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent study as arranged with a graduate school faculty member.

BE 7600 Theological Bioethics and Contemporary Alternatives - 3 Hours

A theological examination of topics in moral theology and theological ethics and their application to a wide range of bioethical issues, identifying common ground and differences with other competing contemporary outlooks.

BE 7700 Bioethics Seminar - 1-4 Hours

Topical course conducted as a seminar on a question such as autonomy and informed consent, health care systems, resource allocation, genetic intervention, or end-of-life decision making. May be repeated for credit. Cannot be taken as a Reading Course. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 8100 Contemporary Figures in Bioethics - 2-3 Hours

This course includes presentations by several prominent Christian figures in bioethics as well as readings from an array of significant Christian leaders in bioethics. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

Philosophical Theology and Apologetics

PR 5600 Christian Faith and Contemporary Challenges - 2 Hours

An introduction to some intellectual challenges to the Christian worldview and how biblically and theologically responsible Christians might respond to such challenges. Consideration is given to the central themes shaping the Christian faith, contrasting them with themes in other worldviews; to the relation between faith and reason in dealing with intellectual questions; and to some basic logical principles and concepts which are important both for doing theology and responding to critiques of Christian claims. Several specific intellectual challenges to the Christian faith (e.g., the existence of God, the problem of evil/suffering, faith and science, the historicity of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, and religious pluralism) are examined, and possible Christian responses to them are developed.

PR 6000 Current Studies in Philosophy of Religion - 1-4 Hours

Topics selected deal with significant issues related to philosophy of religion.

PR 6410 History of Phil of Religion I - 3 Hours

This course covers ancient and medieval philosophy of religion and ends with discussion of the rationalists Descartes, Spinoza, and, Leibniz.

PR 6411 History of Phil of Religion II - 3 Hours

This course begins with study in the early modern period with the empiricists (Locke, Berkekey, and Hume) and continues with an examination of the contemporary period.

PR 7330 Philosophers of Religion and of Religious Significance - 3-4 Hours

In-depth consideration of the philosophy of an important religious thinker such as Augustine, Aquinas, Kierkegaard, Tillich, and Hartshorne, or of an important nonreligious thinker such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Leibniz, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Russell, or Wittgenstein, whose thought strongly influenced religious and theological issues. May be repeated for credit.

PR 7480 MA Major Paper - 0-2 Hours

Participants in MA programs requiring a capstone integrative paper register for this course (MA/ICS). Specific paper requirements should be obtained from the department. Counts as half-time academic status. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as required by the program.

PR 7485 MA Thesis - 0-3 Hours

MA thesis writers register for PR 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

PR 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for PR 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter.CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

PR 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

PR 7705 Religious Epistemology - 3-4 Hours

Examination of the ways of knowing and tests for truth with special emphasis on the problems of religious knowledge and their implications for theological issues.

PR 7715 Theism - 3-4 Hours

Study in the existence and nature of God with emphasis on theistic arguments (ontological, cosmological, teleological, and moral) and on the internal coherence of such divine attributes as necessity, omnipotence, and omniscience.

PR 7750 Philosophical Issues in Religious Pluralism - 3-4 Hours

Consideration of the major epistemological and metaphysical issues for philosophy of religion arising from the discussions on religious diversity and religious pluralism. The views of influential philosophers such as John Hick, William Alston, Keith Ward, and others are examined, as well as responses to their work.

PR 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

PR 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

PR 7980 MA Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

MA participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for PR 7980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a MA capstone research paper (MA/PR). Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded C- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

PR 8000 Seminar: Current Issues - 2-4 Hours

Analyses of selected issues in philosophy of religion and their implications for Christian thought. Examples include the following: questions concerning the concept of God, the nature and possibility of the miraculous, freedom and determinism, religion and science, phenomenology, and the historicity of the resurrection of Christ.