ST 5201 Theology I: The God of the Gospel - 3 Hours

This course establishes the foundations for systematic theology, reflecting upon the triune God and the God-world relation. It introduces theological methodology and treats the doctrines of general and special revelation, particularly that of Holy Scripture. The course also engages theology proper (the divine perfections and personal attributes of the Holy Trinity) and the works of God in creating and providentially caring for the cosmos, including humans.

ST 5202 Theology II: The Gospel of God - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the gospel, the economy of salvation, the incarnation of the Son, and the Holy Spirit. The course begins by treating the human condition as now fallen, and sin as the backdrop of the gospel. Attention then turns to the work of Christ, particularly the atonement and accomplishment of redemption as the content of the gospel. The course then considers the application and consummation of redemption by examining the work of the Holy Spirit, the nature, mission, and destiny of the church as the gathered people of God as the climax of the gospel. The course concludes with a consideration of how the gospel story ends, for believers and unbelievers in the glory of God's being all in all in the new heaven and the new earth. Prerequisite: ST 5201.

ST 7200 Theological Ethics - 3 Hours

This course is an examination of how Christian ethics moves from biblical and systematic theology to moral theology and how theological commitments (e.g., theology proper, anthropology, Christology, soteriology, pneumatology, ecclesiology) structure and govern moral reflection. It explores the application of a robust, moral-theological framework to issues of contemporary personal, pastoral, and societal importance (such as personhood and human dignity, biomedical technologies, sexual ethics, and the pursuit of peace, justice, and reconciliation). Prerequisites: ST 5201 and 5202.

ST 7395 Hermeneutics - 3 Hours

The science of biblical interpretation with examination and explanation of the various systems of such. Using selected passages of Scripture, the disciplines necessary in biblical interpretation come to be understood and developed.

ST 7477 MA Major Comprehensive Exam - 1 Hour

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some MA programs. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

ST 7485 MA Thesis - 0-3 Hours

MA thesis writers register for ST 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

ST 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for ST 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter.CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

ST 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

ST 7505 Use of Scripture and Theology - 3 Hours

This course examines the manifold ways in which theologians, ancient and modem, evangelical and non-evangelical, Western and non-Western, view and especially use Scripture to formulate theological proposals, with regard both to Christian doctrine and practice. The course compares prominent schools of interpretation within the broader theological landscape and constructively suggests ways to extend the logic of Scriptural teaching into contemporary contexts. The twin questions, 'What does it mean to be biblical?' and 'How ought biblical authority actually work?' are addressed by developing an account of how the ancient biblical writings that comprise Scripture (divine discourse) generate and govern contemporary theological understanding and practice. Several case studies are employed to help students learn how to move from biblical exegesis to systematic theological reflection, and thus to become self consciously evangelical theologians who know how rightly to handle the word of truth.

ST 7715 Political Theologies - 3-4 Hours

A course designed to clarify what constitutes a 'political theology' and to investigate the biblical and theological bases of representative political theologies. Discussion focuses around such systems as liberation theology, black theology, and feminist theology.

ST 7911 Colloquium in Systematic Theology - 1 Hour

Integrative seminar for all students majoring in theology on various topics of contemporary concern. May be repeated. Credit / No Credit.

ST 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

ST 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

ST 7980 MA Major Research Paper - 0-2 Hours

MA participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for ST 7980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a MA capstone research paper (MA/PR). Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded C- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

ST 8000 Seminar: Current Issues in Theology - 2-4 Hours

Lectures or seminar in a distinctive area of biblical or systematic theology; topics chosen in relation to the special competence of resident and visiting faculty, as well as current interests and needs.

ST 8030 The Problem of Evil - 3-4 Hours

An examination of one of the traditional problems for Christian theism. After initially clarifying the nature of this attack against theism, discussion turns to different defenses and theodicies offered in response to this problem. Treatment will cover the problem in both its logical and evidential forms.

ST 8100 Essentials of Reformed Theology - 3 Hours

This course delves into a particular theological tradition rather than a single doctrine ? the Reformed. A single guiding question generates and governs the course contents and its conversation partners: ?What makes Reformed theology distinctly Reformed?? We approach this overarching question, much as one would a summit, by exploring various paths of ascent: textual, contextual, historical, hermeneutical, doctrinal, conceptual, ideological, confessional, and comparative.

ST 8101 Karl Barth as Theological Interpreter of Scripture - 3 Hours

A critical analysis of the origins, developments, and major contours of Barth's theology from his earliest writings to his later Church Dogmatics through an inductive study of selected primary texts and interaction with key secondary sources. Special attention is given to Barth's theological method, hermeneutics, and doctrine of the Word of God, as well as to other central theological topics (e.g., election, providence, the relation of dogmatics to ethics). Barth's ideas are examined in the context of his life, the larger historical and intellectual context of his world, and the contemporary theological situation.

ST 8102 Analytic Theology - 3 Hours

This course provides an overview of one of the most important recent developments in theology, namely, analytic theology. This is an approach to theology that borrows ideas, concepts, and methods from analytic philosophy. The course begins with an introduction to the history and nature of analytic theology and then examines core Christian doctrines as they have been recently discussed by analytic theologians. This course is intended to provide students with the resources for developing their own evaluation of the fruit of analytic theology as it pertains to Christian faith, practice, and ministry.

ST 8103 Bonaventure - 3 Hours

Bonaventure was a major thinker within the landscape of 13th century Latin scholasticism. Due to his appointment as minister general of the Franciscan order, Bonaventure also became an important writer in the areas of pastoral care and devotional or mystical literature. This seminar surveys Bonaventure's theological contributions, with special attention paid to sustained engagement with primary texts.

ST 8104 Anselm and the Victorines - 3 Hours

Anselm is widely viewed as the first great scholastic thinker of the so-called middle ages. His influence is also extensive among medieval appropriations of Augustine's theology. This class engages major texts from Anselm's corpus, and explores dimensions of his influence by also investigating major works by Hugh and Richard of St. Victor.

ST 8105 Arminius and Arminianism - 3 Hours

This course is a seminar on the theologies of Jacob Arminius, the Dutch Remonstrant movement, and later English "Arminianism." It is a seminar in historical theology; while neither the social historical contexts nor the possibilities of "retrieval theology" will be ignored, our first task is to understand these various theological proposals within their respective intellectual contexts of Protestant scholasticism and early modern theology/philosophy. Major doctrinal issues, including the divine Trinity and attributes, Christology, hamartiology, and soteriology, are explored in detail.

ST 8106 God: Present and Hidden - 3 Hours

This course is two-pronged: exploring both God's hiddenness or absence and God's presence. First, it explores the question of divine hiddenness. The philosophical, yet very practical and even existential, question of why God does not make himself more known to humans. This question, at times, forms the basis for an argument to atheism and this course addresses this question from philosophical, theological, and biblical perspectives. Second, as a counterbalance to God's purported hiddenness and/or absence, this course explores the ways that God is present in the world. Under this rubric, we examine divine action in the world related to providence and miracles; God's presence in theophanies; the divine attribute of omnipresence; God's presence in "Emmanuel" (that is, God Incarnate, Jesus Christ); and God's presence through intermediary means such as the Lord's Supper. Not resting with purely academic answers to these questions, this course also pushes us to think more deeply about how to minister God's presence in our contemporary ministry settings.

ST 8107 Social Ethics - 3 Hours

A seminar focusing upon Christian approaches to social ethics from a diversity of vantage points and in relation to a variety of topics (e.g., economic injustice, race and ethnicity, education funding, healthcare access, housing and incarceration policy).

ST 8200 Seminar: Current Issues in Theology (eligible for 3rd MDiv Requirement) - 3 Hours

Lectures or seminar in a distinctive area of biblical or systematic theology with special relevance to pastoral ministry; topics chosen in relation to the special competence of resident and visiting faculty,as well as current interests and needs. Unlike ST 8000, this course can be used to fulfill the 3rd required class in ST for the MDiv curriculum.

ST 8210 Divine Action and the Doctrine of Providence - 3 Hours

This course surveys the history of the doctrine of divine providence and identifies key issues before attempting a dogmatic account. Special attention is given to the concept of divine action, especially with reference to science and metaphysics. The concern is to articulate, in accordance with the Scripture, what we may hope. The central focus is God's care for individuals, church, and cosmos.

ST 8211 God in Biblical Theology and Systematic Theology - 3 Hours

This course on the doctrine of God has four interrelated aims: (1) to become acquainted with classical and contemporary approaches to Christian theism and assess their faithfulness to Scripture (2) to examine current approaches to the relationship of biblical and systematic theology (3) to learn to identify and interpret figurative language used to speak of God (e.g., metaphors, analogies, anthropomorphisms) (4) to bring all of the above to bear on the question of divine im/passibility. The course thus focuses on how we move from biblical to theological language to speak of God and formulate a doctrine of God and the nature of his relation to the world, with special attention to the issue of divine suffering.

ST 8212 The Doctrine of the Trinity: Classical Formulations and Contemporary Issues - 3 Hours

A study in the biblical sources, classic formulations, and theological issues that are important in the doctrine of the Trinity. Classical formulations, in ecumenical creeds as well as major patristic, medieval, and early modern (Protestant scholastic) theologians, are studied within their historical contexts, and important movements in modern and contemporary theology are studied against the backdrop of these historic statements.

ST 8213 Models of Sanctification - 3 Hours

A course involving a biblical and theological investigation of several models of sanctification held within Christian movements and denominations. Emphasizes understanding of each model, as well as encouraging students to develop their own biblically based model capable of implementation within a ministry context.

ST 8214 Justification - 3-4 Hours

This course considers the biblical and theological foundations of this doctrine. It explores these foundational elements incorporating a historical perspective. Influential thinkers will be studied in the flow of important eras in the Church ranging from the time of Augustine to contemporary discussions. Recent conversations between members of the Protestant camp and Roman Catholics on justification, as well as on the New Perspective, will be engaged.

ST 8215 Pneumatology - 3-4 Hours

A study of the person and work of the Holy Spirit, including a defense of His deity and personality, his work in the Old Testament, the life of Christ, and the New Testament era, as well as discussion of contemporary issues related to this doctrine, such as tongues, divine healing, and prophecy.

ST 8220 Christology: Classical Formulations and Contemporary Issues - 3 Hours

A study in the biblical sources, classic formulations, and theological issues that are important in the doctrine of Christ. Classical formulations, in ecumenical creeds as well as major patristic, medieval, and early modern (Protestant scholastic) theologians, are studied within their historical contexts, and important movements in modern and contemporary theology are studied against the backdrop of these historic statements.

ST 8221 The Doctrine of the Atonement: Classical Formulations and Contemporary Issues - 3 Hours

A study in the doctrine of the atonement in light of its biblical foundations, classical elaborations, and contemporary appropriations.

ST 8222 Theologies of the Sacraments/Ordinances - 3 Hours

This course introduces a theological approach to a variety of church practices that sometimes fall under the heading of sacraments or ordinances. Central to this course is an examination of the biblical and theological underpinning to such practices as Baptism and the Eucharist. This course also introduces theological resources for addressing additional doctrinal issues touching such topics as ordination, marriage, preaching, and death. Moreover, students will work toward bridge-building from the conceptual theological discussion of these issues to the practical manifestation of these practices in the life of the church.

ST 8223 Theologies of Prayer - 3 Hours

This is a course involving a biblical and theological investigation of prayer. Oftentimes restricted to an issue of "practical theology" prayer is a provocative locus for discussion of a number of key systematic theological issues such as providence and human responsibility; God's relation to time, creation, and humans; sanctification; worship; and others.

ST 8310 Theology of Augustine - 3-4 Hours

Augustine stands as a foundational thinker in Roman Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox traditions. He was a critical thinker at a critical time in the life of the Church. This course will consider the life and times of Augustine as informing elements in his theological development. Some of his best known works will be read and discussed to identify particular theological stances. These stances were also affected by what he saw as specific challenges to biblical faith arising from movements, such as Manichaeism, Donatism, and Pelagianism.

ST 8360 Karl Barth - 3 Hours

A critical analysis of the origins, developments, and major contours of Barth's theology from his earliest writings to his later Church Dogmatics through a study of selected primary texts. Special attention will be given to Barth's theological method, hermeneutics, and doctrine of the Word of God, as well as to other central theological topics (e.g., election, providence, the relation of dogmatics to ethics).

ST 8390 Recent & Contemporary Theologians - 3-4 Hours

Lectures or seminar in the work and writing of an important theologian of the present or recent past. Theologians selected for study reflect the special competence of resident and visiting faculty.

ST 8410 Theology in Contemporary Literature - 3 Hours

Works by authors such as Melville, Dostoevsky, Conrad, Shaw, Beckett, Updike, Lewis, Tolkien, Eliot, Auden, Williams, Fry, Buder, Joyce, Camus, Kafka, Faulkner, Salinger, and MacDonald are read and analyzed, and their theological perspective and implications are discussed. Offered on demand.

ST 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for - 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

ST 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-3 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for ST 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

ST 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for ST 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

ST 9001 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. Available in all PhD programs. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours in PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS programs; may be repeated for a maximum of six hours in the PhD/THS program. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

ST 9011 Private Study - 0 Hours

In special circumstances, a student may register for one or more semesters of Private Study in order to meet the requirements for candidacy. Only for PhD/THS students in CH, NT, OT, ST departments. Counts as full-time student status when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week (half-time is 15 hours per week) are invested in doctoral study and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. May be repeated four times. No Credit.

ST 9100 Advanced Theological Prolegomena - 3-4 Hours

A course designed to explore the integrative character of Christian theology, focusing the contributions of the separate theological disciplines on the constructive and creative task of Systematic Theology. Students are encouraged to develop an approach that is integrative, orthodox, and creative, through the critical assessment of the theological proposals of evangelical and nonevangelical theologians. To be taken concurrently ST 9110. Offered fall.

ST 9110 The Theological Scholar - 2 Hours

An orientation to doctoral-level scholarship (the development of an argument, research philosophy and methodology, good writing skills, dissertation preparation), to program specifics, and to the doctoral community life and ethos. It will also include papers presented by four professors, one from each of the THS departments, to illustrate and generate discussion about "theological integration." Must be taken in conjunction with DST 9100 (Advanced Theological Prolegomena) in the first semester after matriculation. Required of all PhD/THS students.

ST 9222 Principles of Higher Education - 2 Hours

A discussion of the educational process, activities, and the instructional techniques used in higher education. Offered spring.

ST 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat the course twice for a total of three hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat it once. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ST 9990 Dissertation Proposal Prep - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. Only PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat this course twice for a total of 3 hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat this course once for a total of 3 hours. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ST 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Courses taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ST 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.