Course Descriptions

BE 474 Introduction to Bioethics - 3 Hours

An overview of the Hippocratic/Judeo-Christian tradition in medical ethics against the background of biblical-theological discussion of human nature, medicine, and healing, and as a context for the rise of the new bioethics. Prerequisite: PH 180 or consent of instructor. This course is taught with BE 5010 at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Offered fall semester. Delivery mode: synchronous.

BE 475 Topics in Bioethics - 1-3 Hours

This course is taught in conjunction with BE 7100 at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Delivery mode: synchronous.

BE 5010 Introduction to Bioethics: Foundations and Methods - 2-3 Hours

An introduction to the interdisciplinary and interprofessional study of bioethics with emphasis on surveying the foundational concepts, history, methodologies, and topical issues pertinent to the development and contemporary study of bioethics from within biblical-theological and other prominent contemporary perspectives.

BE 5020 Bioethics and Cultural Engagement - 2-3 Hours

This course introduces central Christian beliefs and worldview as a framework within which to evaluate the working ethical assumptions of contemporary culture. In addition to investigating several models for Christian engagement with culture, the course encourages the positive formation of a Christian worldview as a foundation for wise engagement with contemporary thought in bioethics.

BE 5100 Intensive Bioethics Institute - 2-3 Hours

This course is a survey of the field of bioethics, introducing competing ways of addressing bioethical issues from historical, philosophical, and theological perspectives. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 5200 Research Ethics - 2 Hours

The application of critical and ethical thinking to the philosophy and professional practice of scientific research. Students will assess the historical framework as well as the current standards and policies (national and international) for human subject research. Topics covered will include risks and benefits, informed consent, vulnerability, privacy, and confidentiality. Offered online and face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 5299 The Clinical Context - 1 Hour

An explanation of basic precepts of clinical medicine and clinical ethics. Designed to be taken concurrently with BE 5300. Offered as a guided study.

BE 5300 Clinical Issues in Bioethics - 2 Hours

An introduction to clinical bioethics and issues in medical ethics, with special emphasis on clinical ethics consultation, the role of clinical ethics committees, plus in-depth case analysis of specific ethical issues that arise in contemporary clinical practice. Prerequisite or taken concurrently: BE 5299.

BE 5400 Nursing Ethics - 2 Hours

This course is designed to prepare nurses for the ethical issues they will encounter in daily practice. Ethics of care, the changing face of health care resulting from globalization, interprofessionalism, expanding use of technologies, and limited financial and other resources are among the challenges addressed.

BE 5499 The Public Policy Context - 1 Hour

An explanation of basic federal and state governmental structures and legislative processes. Designed to be taken concurrently with BE 5500. Offered as an online guided study.

BE 5500 Bioethics and Public Policy - 2 Hours

The interface of bioethics and public policy in North American and international contexts with special attention to religious perspectives in the public square, important cases and bioethics commissions, and other documents. Students have the opportunity to create a public policy strategy. Prerequisite or taken concurrently: BE 5499.

BE 5900 Bioethics National Conference - 2-3 Hours

The annual national/international bioethics conference at Trinity provides a unique opportunity to learn from and interact with Christian leaders in bioethics from around the country and beyond. The course includes a preconference reading program and post-conference writing program tailored to the topic of the conference. Class meetings with the professor immediately precede and are interspersed throughout the conference. Cannot be taken as a Guided Reading Course. May be repeated for credit. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 6000 Christian Hippocratism - 2-3 Hours

This course examines the emergence of Hippocratic medicine and its historical convergence with Christianity as a primary influence on the development and practice of Western medicine through the modern era. Attention will also be given to the rise of competing paradigms in contemporary medicine and prospects of Christian Hippocratism as a principled model for Christian engagement in bioethics.

BE 6010 Life and Death Bioethics - 2-3 Hours

Exploration of prominent bioethical issues at the beginning and end of life, including the ethics of abortion, contraception, assisted reproductive technologies, end-of-life decision making, euthanasia, and other issues within their ethical, legal, social, philosophical, and theological contexts.

BE 6020 Biotechnology and Emerging Technology Ethics - 2-3 Hours

This course examines cutting-edge bioethical issues within biomedicine, biotechnology, and other emerging technology arenas, including developments in genetic ethics, neuroethics, nanoethics, synthetic biology, robotics, artificial intelligence, and human futures among other issues within their ethical, legal, social, philosophical, and theological contexts.

BE 6100 Bioethics Colloquium - 1-2 Hours

The colloquium meets periodically during the term, with a professor of record and a combination of visiting lecturers, faculty, and student presentations. Local pastors, physicians, and others are invited to attend, offering a meeting point between the program and church and medical communities. May be repeated for credit.

BE 6150 Contemporary Issues in Bioethics - 1-3 Hours

Trinity-hosted bioethics workshops provide a unique opportunity to explore emerging issues in contemporary bioethics through topical workshops led by an interdisciplinary team of Christian leaders in bioethics from around the country and beyond. This course includes a pre-workshop reading program and post-workshop assignments tailored to the topics of the workshop. Special emphasis is given to the professional dimensions of the issues under consideration, as well as an examination of the evolving academic literature. May be repeated for credit. Offered face to face at the Deerfield Campus.

BE 6200 Ethical Theory - 2-3 Hours

An analysis of the principal theories and problems of philosophical ethics, including the meaning of ethical language, alternative theories of the right and the good, and the implications of moral issues for the concept of God and other theological questions. Formerly: PR 7220. Offered online and face-to-face at the Deerfield campus.

BE 6350 The Right to Life and the Law - 2-3 Hours

A study of the complex medical, social, legal, and bioethical issues raised by such controversial topics as abortion, euthanasia, infanticide, and related issues involving rights conscience, including a survey of Supreme Court and other judicial decisions pertaining to these issues. Offered face to face at the Deerfield campus. May be taken as MLS 910 through Trinity Law School.

BE 6950 Bioethics Practicum - 1-2 Hours

Supervised experience within professional or ministerial settings (e.g., healthcare, public policy, IRB, advocacy organization, church, etc.) engaged in practical bioethics. Emphasis of student assessment materials will be given to demonstrating the application of theoretical bioethics knowledge to the professional or ministerial environment. Prerequisite: BE 5010. Student must obtain the program director's permission and secure site approval before registering.

BE 7200 Landmark Cases in Bioethics - 2-3 Hours

Many of the major issues in bioethics have been shaped by pivotal medical and legal cases. The course examines those cases in detail and uses them as a springboard for understanding the larger ethical issues that they address. May be taken as MLS 720 through Trinity Law School.

BE 7300 Advanced Clinical Ethics - 1-3 Hours

This course will engage students in the process of doing ethical analysis in group discussion and in writing ethics consultation reports on specific cases typically encountered by a consultant in clinical ethics. Two prerequisites: BE 5300; plus either BE 5010 or BE 6000. Students without clinical/medical experience must obtain the professor's permission before registering. Students without BE 5010 or BE 6000 can ask the professor to waive that prerequisite. Offered online.

BE 7478 Bioethics Capstone Project - 1-3 Hours

Independent study culminating in a bioethics-related project, as arranged with the program director or designee. Students should register for this course the semester they start the project. Prerequisite or taken concurrently: BE 5200, BE 5300, BE 5500, and BE 6500 or by permission of the program director.

BE 7480 Bioethics Capstone Integrative or Major Paper - 1-3 Hours

Independent study culminating in a bioethics-related project, as arranged with the program director or designee. Students should register for this course the semester they start the project. Prerequisite or taken concurrently: BE 5200, BE 5300, BE 5500, and BE 6500 or by permission of the program director.

BE 7486 Bioethics Capstone Extension - 0 Hours

A one-semester extension for BE 7478 or BE 7480. Enrollment with consent of the faculty member of record. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as quarter-time academic status. May not be repeated. No Credit.

BE 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit/No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

BE 7600 Theological Bioethics and Contemporary Alternatives - 2-3 Hours

A theological examination of topics in moral theology and theological ethics and their application to a wide range of bioethical issues, identifying common ground and differences with other competing contemporary outlooks.

BE 7650 Bioethics, Human Dignity, and the Church - 2-3 Hours

Issues in bioethics raise fundamental questions of human dignity in the lives of people everywhere, to which the church is uniquely well positioned to speak. This course enables students to understand many of today's bioethical challenges to human dignity and to develop practical ministry resources to address them through the preaching, teaching, worship, counseling, and outreach ministries of the church.

BE 7700 Bioethics Seminar - 1-4 Hours

Topical course conducted as a seminar on a question such as autonomy and informed consent, health care systems, resource allocation, genetic intervention, or end-of-life decision making. May be repeated for credit. Cannot be taken as a Reading Course.

BE 7750 Readings in Bioethics - 1-3 Hours

Examination of topic-specific readings in bioethics from Hippocrates, through the beginning of the modern bioethics period in Fletcher and Ramsey, and on to the present. Readings in the earlier periods may focus on the birth and development of the Hippocratic/Judeo-Christian tradition or classic concepts or works of bioethics. Readings in the contemporary bioethicists may place special focus on the secularization of bioethics as seen in such writers as Singer, Engelhardt, and Childress or may explore contemporary developments in topical literature of distinct applied areas of bioethics. The course may focus on either classical or contemporary readings. May be repeated for credit.

BE 7800 Personhood in Theological and Philosophical Perspective - 2-3 Hours

Analysis of the role played by this key concept in bioethical debate against the background of philosophical and theological usage.

BE 7810 Global Health and Justice - 2-3 Hours

An exploration of global bioethics, with particular focus on biblical, theological, and philosophical approaches to justice, and their relevance to issues in global health and medicine.

BE 8100 Contemporary Figures in Bioethics - 2-3 Hours

This course includes presentations by several prominent Christian figures in bioethics as well as readings from an array of significant Christian leaders in bioethics.

BI 101 Understanding the Old Testament - 3 Hours

A survey of the setting, history, and literature of the Old Testament. Emphasis is given to major Old Testament themes, including covenant, salvation, worship, wisdom, justice and righteousness, and messianic hope. Delivery mode: Online, Wisconsin Prison Initiative, and Florida undergraduate.

BI 105 Understanding the Old Testament - 3 Hours

An introduction to the Old Testament, with an emphasis on its content, themes, and message. Students learn to read these Scriptures in their literary, social, and historical context so as to better understand their contemporary relevance and apply them faithfully. Delivery mode: online.

BI 111 Understanding the New Testament - 3 Hours

A survey of the setting, history, and literature of the New Testament. Emphasis is given to major New Testament themes, including the person and work of Jesus Christ, the ministry of the Holy Spirit, the theology of Paul, and the Christian in society. Delivery mode: Online, Wisconsin Prison Initiative, and Florida undergraduate.

BI 115 Understanding the New Testament - 3 Hours

An introduction to the New Testament with emphasis on its content, themes, and message. Students learn to read these Scriptures in their literary, social, and historical context so as to better understand their contemporary relevance and apply them faithfully. Delivery mode: online.

BI 210 Biblical Interpretation - 3 Hours

This course is designed to acquaint the student with a basic understanding of the principles of biblical interpretation as well as the primary tools of biblical research. The student will then apply these principles and tools to the study of a selected New Testament epistle. Prerequisite: BI 101 or BI 111. Delivery mode: Online, Wisconsin Prison Initiative, and Florida undergraduate.

BI 211 Ethics and the Bible - 3 Hours

This course examines the people, places, and stories of the Bible as a revealed resource for being and becoming Christian in the 21st century. The goal is to establish an ethical framework consonant with the biblical witness in the context of increasingly antithetical systems in contemporary culture and to learn to apply this ethical framework to issues in our personal lives and in our society in order to become more human and humane. Prerequisites: BI 105 or BI 115. Delivery mode: online.

BI 275 Teaching the Bible - 3 Hours

A study of theories and methods of teaching the Bible utilizing instructional objectives. Students prepare and present lesson plans to demonstrate their proficiency in the stating and accomplishing of appropriate educational objectives. Prerequisite: BI 210. Delivery mode: Online, Wisconsin Prison Initiative, and Florida undergraduate.

BI 290 Interpreting and Teaching the Bible - 3 Hours

This course provides exposure to select theories and further develops skills for interpreting the Bible. Students learn how to transition from interpretation to teaching a variety of audiences with pastoral and contextual sensitivity. Specific attention will be given to interpreting and teaching texts of different genres from both the Old Testament and New Testament. Prerequisites: BI 105 or BI 115. Delivery mode: online.

BI 301 Old Testament Pentateuch and Former Prophets - 3 Hours

A study of the Pentateuch (Genesis through Deuteronomy) and Former Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings) in the Old Testament. This course briefly surveys all books in the corpus, but interpretation focuses on a particular book. Students strengthen interpretive skills by examining key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues in the book. Prerequisite: BI 105. Delivery mode: online.

BI 302 Pentateuch - 3 Hours

A study of the content, theology, and criticism of the Pentateuch. Emphasis will be on major themes like creation, fall, salvation, election, covenant, ethics and worship, and law. A particular book of the Pentateuch will be exegeted in detail and developed from theological and literary perspectives and its literary, social, and historical context. Prerequisites: BI 101, BI 210. Delivery mode: Wisconsin Prison Initiative, Florida undergraduate.

BI 303 Old Testament Latter Prophets - 3 Hours

A study of the Latter Prophets (Isaiah through Ezekiel, the Twelve, and Daniel) in the Old Testament. This course briefly surveys all books in this corpus, but interpretation focuses on a particular book. Students strengthen interpretive skills by examining key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues in the book. Prerequisite: BI 105. Delivery mode: online.

BI 304 Old Testament Prophetic Books - 3 Hours

A study of the historical setting and message of the Old Testament prophets. The course will survey all the prophetic books briefly, and focus a particular prophetic book. Selected passages will be exegeted in class using methods taught in BI 210 Biblical Interpretation. Prerequisites: BI 101, BI 210. Delivery mode: Wisconsin Prison Initiative, and Florida undergraduate.

BI 306 Old Testament Poetic Books - 3 Hours

A study of the poetic books of the Old Testament: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, and Lamentations. Emphasis will be on major themes like praise, lament, messianic hope, the fear of the Lord, the problem of suffering, and the nature of wisdom. A selection of representative psalms and the most important chapters in Wisdom Literatures will be exegeted in detail and developed from a theological and literary perspective. Prerequisites: BI 101, BI 210. Delivery mode: Wisconsin Prison Initiative, and Florida undergraduate.

BI 307 Old Testament Writings - 3 Hours

A study of the poetic books (Psalms, Job, Proverbs, Song of Songs, Ecclesiastes, Lamentations) and post-exile narratives (Ezra/Nehemiah, Esther, Chronicles) in the Old Testament. This course briefly surveys all books in the corpus, but interpretation focuses on a particular book. Students strengthen interpretive skills by examining key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues in the book. Prerequisite: BI 105. Delivery mode: online.

BI 308 Old Testament Historical Books - 3 Hours

A consideration of the basic outline of Israelite history contained in the books of Joshua-2 Kings, Ezra, Nehemiah, and 1 and 2 Chronicles. In addition to content and theology of a particular historical book, emphasis is on the historiography of the biblical authors and differing modern historiographical approaches to these Old Testament books. Prerequisites: BI 101, BI 210. Delivery mode: Wisconsin Prison Initiative and Florida undergraduate.

BI 312 Life of Christ - 3 Hours

A study of the life of Jesus Christ, with emphasis on crisis events. Attention is given to Jesus in a particular Gospel, to the developments in Jesus' ministry, and to the topics of messiahship, kingdom of God, discipleship, and controversy. Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 210. Delivery mode: Wisconsin Prison Initiative, and Florida undergraduate.

BI 313 New Testament Church - 3 Hours

A study of early Christianity based on the Book of Acts. Attention is given to the historicity of Acts, the careers of Peter and Paul, and the dynamics that spread the church into the Roman world. Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 210. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BI 331 New Testament Synoptic Gospels and Acts - 3 Hours

A study of the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke) and Acts in the New Testament. This course briefly surveys all books in the corpus, but interpretation focuses on a particular book. Students strengthen interpretive skills by examining key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues in the book. Prerequisite: BI 115. Delivery mode: online.

BI 333 New Testament Pauline Epistles - 3 Hours

A study of the Pauline epistles (Romans through Philemon) in the New Testament. This course briefly surveys all books in this corpus, but interpretation focuses on a particular book. Students strengthen interpretive skills by examining key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues in the book. Prerequisite: BI 115. Delivery mode: online.

BI 335 Theology of the General Epistles - 3 Hours

A study of major theological themes of the general epistles including christology, soteriology, and sanctification with detailed exegetical attention given to a particular general epistle. Prerequisite: BI 111; BI 210 recommended. Delivery mode: Wisconsin Prison Initiative and Florida undergraduate.

BI 336 Theology of the Pauline Epistles - 3 Hours

A study of major theological themes of the Pauline literature including soteriology, ecclesiology, and theology proper, with detailed exegetical attention given to a Pauline epistle. Prerequisite BI 111 required; BI 210 recommended. Delivery mode: Wisconsin Prison Initiative and Florida undergraduate.

BI 337 New Testament General Epistles - 2 Hours

A study of the general epistles (Hebrews through 2 Peter, Jude) in the New Testament. This course briefly surveys all books in this corpus, but interpretation focuses on a particular book. Students strengthen interpretive skills by examining key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues in the book. Prerequisite: BI 115. Delivery mode: online.

BI 339 New Testament Johannine Literature - 2 Hours

A study of the Johannine literature (Gospel of John, 1-3 John, Revelation) in the New Testament. This course briefly surveys all books in the corpus, but interpretation focuses on a particular book. Students strengthen interpretive skills by examining key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues in the book. Prerequisite: BI 115. Delivery mode: online.

BI 350 Topics in the Bible - 1-3 Hours

A study of an individual book or topic in Old Testament or New Testament. May be repeated for different books or topics. Prerequisites: BI 105 or BI 115, and BI 210. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BI 400 Romans - 3 Hours

A study of the background, content, and theology of Paul's letter to Rome; emphasis is placed on the development of major themes of the book. Prerequisites: BI 101 and BI 111. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BI 405 New Testament Theology - 3 Hours

An in-depth study of the central tenets of the Christian faith with emphasis on the doctrines of God, the church, sin, and salvation. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BI 415 Theological Issues - 3 Hours

An examination of theological issues within selected categories of systematic theology with an emphasis on the key doctrines in each category as viewed from differing theological perspectives. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate and Florida undergraduate.

BI 430 The Book of Acts - 3 Hours

A study of the background, content, and theology of the early church as found in Acts. Emphasis is placed on the development of the early church, the missionary journeys, and the relationship of the gospels and epistles to the historical events in Acts. Prerequisites: BI 101 and BI 111. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

BI 435 Revelation - 3 Hours

A study of the background, content, and theology of the book of Revelation. Emphasis is placed upon identifying the major themes of the book by interpreting its messages and visions. In addition, attention is given to the major interpretive approaches to the book. Prerequisites: BI 101 and BI 111. Delivery Mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

BI 450 Independent Study - 1-4 Hours

Advanced study in special topics for students who have demonstrated ability in biblical studies. The preparation of a research paper will normally be required. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online and Florida undergraduate.

BIO 103 Introductory Biology - 4 Hours

A general survey of the basic principles of biology with an emphasis on humanity and humanity's role in nature. The scientific method, evolutionary theory, and Christianity as the basis of understanding nature and its problems are considered. Laboratory is included. Delivery mode: Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

BIO 145 Human Biology - 4 Hours

A study of basic principles of biology, cells, genetics, anatomy and physiology, and the human impact on the environment. Special emphasis will be given to understanding anatomy and physiology as it pertains to the workings of the human body and its response to disease. This course is suitable for non science majors and includes laboratory experience. Not for credit toward a major in biology. Laboratory fee. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BIO 150 Laboratory Methods in Biology - 1-3 Hours

This course is designed to meet the needs of the student who requires or desires laboratory experience in a particular area of biology additional to that available as part of the regularly offered coursework. The area of study will vary with the needs of the student. Prerequisites: at least one introductory course in biology and consent of the department chair. Laboratory fee. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BIO 300 Environmental Conservation - 3 Hours

An ecological approach to the study of conservation of natural resources as related to current environmental problems. Significant fieldwork is required. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BIO 320 Immunology - 3 Hours

A study of the cellular and molecular nature of innate and adaptive immune systems, including immunoglobulins, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, immunopathology, immunobiology, and cancer biology. Prerequisites: BIO 111 and CH 112. Courses in microbiology, cell and molecular biology, and genetics are highly recommended. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BIO 340 Human Anatomy and Physiology I - 4 Hours

An in-depth study of the anatomical and physiological features of the following human body systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, circulatory, digestive/metabolic, lymphatic, and endocrine. Relevant clinical information and pathology are discussed. A strong emphasis is placed on experimental study and analysis of physiological processes. This course is suitable for premedical students, health sciences students, students wishing to pursue graduate studies in science, and education majors with a science emphasis. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites or corequisites: BIO 111 or CH 111-CH 112, or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee. Offered each year for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Both semesters must be completed in order to apply to major. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BIO 400 Origins and Evolution - 3 Hours

A critical examination of the empirical and theoretical bases for the theories of the origin of life and biological evolution. The scriptural account of creation and the various schools of thought on creation and evolution are considered. Prerequisites: BIO 111, BIO 112 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BIO 420X Cell and Molecular Biology - 4 Hours

A detailed study of the structure and function of cells in their genetic, biochemical, developmental, physiological and pathophysiological aspects. This course introduces students to the relationships that exist between cell structure and biochemical processes necessary for eukaryotic cell growth, differentiation, and death. Laboratory included. Prerequisites: BIO 111, and CH 320. Laboratory fee. Offered spring semester in even-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Cross listed with CH 420X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BIO 430 Developmental Biology - 4 Hours

A study of the nature of developmental processes of animals at the classical, experimental, and molecular levels. Reading, abstracting and presenting primary journal articles in the field of developmental biology constitutes the laboratory portion of the course. Prerequisites: BIO 111, BIO 340, BIO 341. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate. .

BRS 290X Christian Apologetics - 3 Hours

Introduction to the major intellectual challenges facing Christianity, and examination of the means and methods Christians have used to address these challenges. Proofs for God's existence and a broad range of philosophical approaches for defending the Christian faith. Cross-listed with PH 290X.

BRS 305 Theology I: The God of the Gospel - 3 Hours

This course reflects upon the triune God and the God-world relation. It introduces theological methodology and treats the doctrines of general and special revelation, particularly that of Holy Scripture. The course also engages theology proper (the divine perfections and personal attributes of the Holy Trinity) and the works of God in creating and providentially caring for the cosmos, including humans. Delivery mode: online.

BRS 306 Theology II: The Gospel of God - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the gospel, the economy of salvation, the incarnation of the Son, and the Holy Spirit. The course begins by treating the human condition as now fallen, and sin as the backdrop of the gospel. Attention then turns to the work of Christ, particularly the atonement and accomplishment of redemption as the content of the gospel. The course then considers the application and consummation of redemption by examining the work of the Holy Spirit, the nature, mission, and destiny of the church as the gathered people of God as the climax of the gospel. The course concludes with a consideration of how the gospel story ends, for believers and unbelievers, in the glory of God's being all in all in the new heaven and new earth. Prerequisite: BRS 305. Delivery mode: online.

BRS 321X American Church History - 3 Hours

A survey of the history of Christianity in America from the colonial period to the present. Special attention is given to the Protestant evangelical tradition. Cross-listed with HI 321X. Delivery mode: online.

BRS 330 Christian Evidences - 3 Hours

An examination of the concept of "evidence" and a rigorous study of the historical events and documents upon which Christianity rests, as well as a comprehensive overview of the presuppositions and conceptions that are inimical to orthodox Christianity and how they may be handled. Prerequisite: Any two of the general education requirement courses (BI 101, BI 111, or BI 210). Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BRS 331 Christian Doctrine - 3 Hours

A study of the major doctrines of Christianity as taught in the Bible, with some emphasis on the development of doctrines in the history of the Church and the various options held by the Christian Church. Prerequisite: BI 101 or BI 111. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BRS 332 Biblical Theology - 3 Hours

A survey of the methods and content of biblical theology. Emphasis is on the Bible's storyline examine how the books and corpora of the Bible contribute to the unfolding history of redemption. Attention is given to themes of temple, sacrifice, priest, rest, kingship, exile, idolatry, promise, messiah, wisdom, and others. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

BRS 338 Theological and Sociological Foundations of Evangelism - 3 Hours

A study of the theology of evangelism and contemporary sociological factors of conversion. Examination of the gospel message and biblical reasons for doing evangelism and consideration of issues in understanding why people convert, in order to formulate an evangelical understanding of evangelism. Contemporary evangelistic methods and evaluation of them in light of the material presented in class. Students are challenged to make evangelism a component of daily life whether in a vocational ministry or a secular occupation. Delivery mode: online.

BRS 340X History of Christianity - 3 Hours

A survey of the history of the Christian church from the New Testament to the present. Approximately equal time is spent on the early, medieval, Reformation, and modern periods. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Cross-listed with HI 340X. Delivery mode: online, Florida undergraduate, and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

BRS 341 Theology: Prolegomena, Scripture, Theology Proper - 3 Hours

This course begins by clarifying the nature, method, and necessity of theology. Discussion then moves to the doctrine of Scripture, including revelation, inspiration, illumination, and inerrancy. This course concludes with the study of the existence and nature of God (including the Trinity), God's works of creation (including angels), and providence. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

BRS 342 Theology: Christ, Humanity, Sin, Salvation - 3 Hours

This course covers the study of the person and work of Christ. It treats the nature of man both as a creature and as a sinner, including original sin, imputation of sin, and the nature and consequences of individual acts of sin. Discussion focuses on both the atoning work of Christ and on the application of the work of Christ by the Holy Spirit that runs from election through conversion and justification all the way to glorification. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

BRS 343 Theology: Holy Spirit, Church, Last Things - 3 Hours

This course begins with the study of the person and work of the Holy Spirit. Focus then shifts to the doctrine of the church. Topics include the nature, mission, function, organization, and ordinances of the church; the use of the gifts of the Holy Spirit in ministry; and the relation of Israel to the church. The course concludes with a treatment of the Last Things in relation to individuals (including the intermediate state and the resurrection of the body) and in relation to the following corporate groups: the church, Israel, and the nations. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

BRS 350 Topics in Biblical and Religious Studies - 1-3 Hours

A study of selected biblical or religious topics. May be repeated for different topics. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BRS 359 Topics for Honors Students - 3 Hours

Selected topics not taught under specific course titles. Depending on the topic, the course will be designated as falling under one or more departments. May be repeated for credit if the topic differs. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BRS 363X Survey of Religious Diversity - 3 Hours

A survey of the world's major religions, including Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and other religious movements. The specific aim of the course is to learn how to understand and engage a full range of religious worldviews from the perspective of the Christian faith. Special attention is given to comparing and contrasting religious movements with the historic Christian faith. The course probes various dimensions of the problem of religious truth, explores the possibility of constructing a systematic understanding of religions, and seeks to formulate creative and thoughtful responses to the problem of religious diversity. Cross-listed with PH 363X. Delivery mode: online.

BRS 400 Bible and Ministry Senior Seminar - 3 Hours

A seminar that focuses on the needs and issues related to preparing for postgraduate ministry or education. Includes in-depth study of selected problems and recent developments related to biblical studies, theology, and ministry. Fulfills the IDS 499X Integrative Thought Capstone requirement for Bible and Ministry majors. Prerequisites: BI 105, BI 115, and CM 172. Delivery mode: online.

BRS 430 Advanced Topics in Religious Studies - 1-3 Hours

Selected courses taught at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors with approval from the Director of TEDS Undergraduate Teaching and TEDS professor. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BRS 437X Music in Worship - 3 Hours

The study of biblical, theological, historical, and practical concepts and patterns for worship of all major Christian traditions. The types of music and the roles music has played in the worship of various historical traditions will be considered in light of the theology of those traditions. Includes the study of congregational song. Student projects will include planning, leading, and evaluating music in worship. Prerequisites: BI 105 and BI 115 or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester in even-numbered years. Cross-listed with WOR 437X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BRS 450 Independent Study - 1-4 Hours

Advanced study in special topics for students who have demonstrated ability in religious studies. The preparation of a research paper will normally be required. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 101 Introduction to Business - 3 Hours

This is a survey course in business that is designed to provide students with a holistic perspective on how and why businesses function. The course exposes students to planning, production, distribution, marketing/advertising, sales, distribution, accounting, finance, human resources, and management. Special consideration is given to ethical responsibility. Offered each semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 103 Introduction to Economics - 3 Hours

Survey of economics. Issues of supply and demand, national income accounting, money and banking, market structures, and contemporary economic issues are studied. Both microeconomic and macroeconomic principles are presented. Not available for credit for students with credit in either BUS 207 or BUS 208, or equivalent. Delivery mode: online, Florida undergraduate.

BUS 111 Principles of Management - 3 Hours

This course exposes students to the general principles of management including planning, organizing, leading, and controlling organizational efforts. Special consideration is given to ethical responsibility and the role of management within the broader social context. Offered as scheduled. Delivery mode: Online, and Florida undergraduate.

BUS 113 Principles of Marketing - 3 Hours

Students are exposed to the principle concepts in marketing, including planning, consumer behavior, segmenting, and positioning. Tactical considerations for products, pricing, channels of distribution, and promotion-advertising, professional selling, sales promotion, digital, and public relations. Special concerns in international marketing and ethical decision making are woven throughout course content. Delivery mode: online, and Florida undergraduate.

BUS 115 Human Resources Management - 3 Hours

Content of this course includes personnel processes, which are considered within a framework of manpower resources development and utilization. Functions and activities of the Human Resources Department are outlined and discussed (e.g. recruitment, selection, training). In addition, the impact of Human Resource function on both the organization (management) and the individual are discussed. Delivery mode: online, and Florida undergraduate.

BUS 181 Survey of International Business - 3 Hours

A survey of business in a global economy. Topics covered include the economic, political, and cultural factors determining the business environment, foreign direct investment, human resource management of foreign labor, international law, international marketing, international trade, international finance, and strategic planning in a global economy. Delivery mode: online.

BUS 201 Business Law - 3 Hours

This course provides an overview and consideration of the general principles of law as applied to commercial situations. Emphasis is given to contracts, negotiable instruments, personal and real property, and trade regulations. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Delivery mode: online.

BUS 207 Microeconomics - 3 Hours

An analysis of market behavior emphasizing the determinants of demand and supply. Emphasis is placed on potential advantages, disadvantages, and limitation of the market system in providing goods and services in an economically efficient manner. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 208 Macroeconomics - 3 Hours

An introduction and survey of the nature of economic problems and analysis. Different methods of organizing society are discussed, with an emphasis placed on U.S. institutions and experience. Prerequisite: BUS 207 or permission of instructor. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 214 Introduction to Managing Nonprofit Organizations - 3 Hours

This course covers the theories and principles for managing nonprofit organizations. This includes practices such as strategy formulation, goal setting, staffing, organizing, implementation, and evaluation. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 221 Principles of Accounting I - 3 Hours

An introduction to principles and procedures, including basic concepts of the accounting cycle and related activities. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

BUS 222 Principles of Accounting II - 3 Hours

For students with an emphasis in Accounting. BUS 222 builds on the concepts in BUS 221. The course covers accounting methods for various components of the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows with an emphasis on evaluating financial performance. Prerequisite: BUS 221. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

BUS 223 Managerial Accounting and Analysis - 3 Hours

For students not emphasizing in accounting. BUS 223 builds on topics from BUS 221 and focuses on the use of accounting information for decision making for management. Topics include cost/volume/profit analysis, forecasting, budgeting, product costing, cost allocation, and performance evaluation. Prerequisite: BUS 221. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate.

BUS 281X Social and Interactive Media Strategies - 3 Hours

An analysis of audience research strategies, conceptualization of message contexts, message design, and content marketing. Brand development and maintenance across various communication channels is examined. Cross listed with COM 281X.

BUS 301 Legal Environment of Organizations - 3 Hours

This course provides a basic understanding of the law as it relates to both for-profit and nonprofit organizations. It studies the legal process, the fundamentals of criminal and tort law, law enforcement, society and the law, contracts, agency, and property and employment law. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 302 Project Management - 3 Hours

This course introduces students to the nature, tasks, and challenges of project management. This includes studying the various phases of project management (project definition, project planning, project execution, project control, and project close-out) and learning the skills that are necessary to navigate each phase successfully. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 303 Topics in Management - 3 Hours

Selected topics as announced. Course may be repeated with different topic. Prerequisite: BUS 101 or BUS 111. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 310 Personal Finance - 3 Hours

This course focuses on equipping students to make informed personal choices in spending, investing, borrowing, savings and giving. Topics include financial goal setting, money management, consumer credit, housing decisions, investments, income tax management, and retirement planning. Open to business and non-business majors. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

BUS 313 Topics in Economics - 3 Hours

Selected topics as announced, including such fields as Public Finance, Labor Economics, and Current Issues. Prerequisites: BUS 207, BUS 208. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 319 Investments - 3 Hours

Students in this course will learn about investments from the perspective of the individual and the investment manager. Topics covered include financial instruments (stocks, bonds, options, futures), securities markets, portfolio development and diversification, security analysis and valuation, international markets and special considerations such as taxes and inflation. Course participants will be challenged to apply course concepts in a market simulation. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 321 Financial Reporting I - 3 Hours

Study of financial accounting and reporting issues, including the conceptual framework, measure and recognition of income, time value of money, measurement, and valuation methodologies for key components of the balance sheet. Balance sheet topics focus on assets and short-term liabilities, such as receivables, inventories, tangible and intangible assets and contingencies. Prerequisite: BUS 222. Offered fall semester even-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 322 Financial Reporting II - 3 Hours

A continuation of BUS 321. The focus is on valuation for long-term liabilities and stockholders' equity, including deferred taxes, pension, leases, long term investment and debt, earning per share, and equity based compensations. Prerequisite: BUS 321. Offered spring semester odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 323 Individual Income Taxation - 3 Hours

An introduction to principles and procedures, including basic concepts of federal income taxation for individuals. The course reflects individual income tax theory and practical tax research and preparation. The course also reflects current and recent legislative, judicial and administrative changes in the federal income tax code and procedures.

BUS 325 Accounting for Business Combinations and Consolidations - 3 Hours

This course covers the rationale and accounting methodologies for business combinations and for consolidating financial statements with controlling interests. Other inter-corporate accounting issues such as intercompany transactions, foreign currency transactions, and translations are covered. Prerequisites: BUS 221, BUS 222. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 326 Cost Accounting - 3 Hours

Concepts and application of cost accounting, procedures, reporting and evaluation of such applications. The course views the cost accounting function (process) as an essential and powerful activity in the business environment. Essential to adequately prepare for the uniform CPA and CMA examinations. Prerequisites: BUS 221, BUS 222. Offered fall semester even-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 327 Theory and Practice of Auditing - 3 Hours

An introduction to principles and procedures, including basic concepts of the auditing cycle and related activities. Emphasis is placed on the attest function, professional standards and ethics, and sampling techniques. Prerequisites: BUS 221, BUS 222. Offered fall semester even-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 328 Quantitative Skills for Managers - 3 Hours

An introduction to the financial and data analysis skills needed by managers. Basic principles of accounting, budgeting, and finance will be covered. Students will learn how to gather, organize, analyze, and present data that are useful for evaluation and decision making in organizations. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 329 Topics in Accounting - 3 Hours

Selected topics as announced. Course may be repeated with different topic. Prerequisites: BUS 221, BUS 222, or permission of instructor. Computer fee may be required for some topics. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 331 Consumer Behavior - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the practical application of social psychological research designed to understand, predict, and influence consumer behavior. Issues covered include persuasion, promotional strategy, sales and marketing planning, personal selling, perception, motivation, nonverbal communication, attitudes, decision-making, learning, compliance, psychographics, and geo-demographics. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate.

BUS 332 Topics in Marketing - 3 Hours

Selected topics as announced. Course may be repeated with different topic. Prerequisite: BUS 113, or permission of instructor. Computer fee for some topics. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 333 Sales Principles and Practices - 3 Hours

This skills-based course focuses on the role of ethical professional selling in organizational and interpersonal interactions. Students are exposed to the different steps in the selling cycle including prospecting, needs assessment, presentation, objection handling, and closing. Prerequisite: BUS 113. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate and Florida undergraduate.

BUS 334 Advertising - 3 Hours

Students in this course will be exposed to the key concepts in advertising, including audience and strategy definition, the creative process, media choices, and campaign development. Course content will also cover creative considerations for different media, including broadcast, print, and Web. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate and Florida undergraduate.

BUS 340 Visionary Leadership - 3 Hours

This course introduces students to a comprehensive framework for understanding the nature and tasks of visionary leadership which includes such activities as clarifying one's own values, envisioning the future, fostering teamwork, and recognizing follower contributions. Throughout this course, students will construct a holistic leadership plan for a project of their choice. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 341 Leading Teams - 3 Hours

This course teaches students how to lead effectively within a variety of team settings. This includes studying the characteristics of effective teams, the processes of teamwork, common problems teams face, and solutions for solving team problems. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 346 Organizational Behavior - 3 Hours

Examines the way individuals, groups, and structures impact the functioning of people within organizations. Course topics include job satisfaction, stress, motivation, decision making, team building, leadership, innovation, and organizational communication. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online, and Florida undergraduate.

BUS 350 Topics in Human Resources - 3 Hours

Selected topics as announced. Course may be repeated with different topic. Prerequisite: BUS 115. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 351 Organizational Development - 3 Hours

This course exposes students to the theory and practice of the discipline of organizational development to affect change. Emphasis is placed on the development of constituency-led changes. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 352 Compensation and Benefits - 3 Hours

Theory and practice of compensation and benefits within the organization. Linking compensation and benefits to strategic goals. Includes performance appraisal, compensation, incentive and benefit practices, and legal/regulatory overview. Prerequisite: BUS 115 or permission of instructor. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate and Florida undergraduate.

BUS 353 Change Management - 3 Hours

This course covers the theory, analysis, and application of intervention methods and procedures to effect change within organizations. Through case studies and other analyses, the class investigates how organizations can bring about successful change, why change is often resisted, and why some organizations' efforts to change fail. Prerequisite: BUS 115 or permission of instructor. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 355 Personnel Evaluation and Coaching - 3 Hours

This course overviews the systematic analysis of employee performance in organizations to identify performance strengths and deficits, to diagnose causes of problems, and to specify solutions. It covers management tools for employee evaluation, such as interviews, self-appraisals, "360 degree feedback," and supervisor ratings for the purposes of job placement, performance appraisal, employee development, awarding merit pay increases, promotion, or employee termination. The course covers internal and external coaching for employee development, for enhancing employee effectiveness, motivation, morale, and productivity, or for intervening with problem employees. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 356 Training and Development - 3 Hours

This course provides an analysis of the relationship of training and development to the practical implementation of organizational goals and strategies. It includes an overview of the principles and practices of training design, teaching techniques, and learning principles used by trainers and supervisors in business, effective training technology, and presentation skills. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 371 Board Governance and Volunteer Management in Nonprofit Organizations - 3 Hours

This course studies the selection, roles, and responsibilities of nonprofit boards. A particular emphasis will be given to understanding the relationship between the organizational executive and the board in addressing managerial challenges. It also addresses the theory and principles of the management of volunteers in a variety of nonprofit settings. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 372X Nonprofit Management - 3 Hours

This course covers the theories and principles unique to managing ministries and not-for-profit social services organizations. Special emphasis is placed on the recruitment and management of volunteers and on effective development and utilization of volunteer boards of directors. Cross-listed with CM 372X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

BUS 373X Nonprofit Financial Management - 3 Hours

This course covers basic concepts in managing finances for nonprofit organizations. Basic accounting topics covered include budgeting, expense control, and measurement in tax-exempt corporations. In addition, the course covers fundraising practices, including annual funding, capital campaigns, planned giving, special events, and grant proposal approaches and procedures. Ethical implications of fundraising and a survey of laws and regulations are also presented. Cross-listed with CM 373X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online, and Florida undergraduate.

BUS 376 Nonprofit Marketing - 3 Hours

This course covers the basic processes and practices of marketing as applied to a variety of nonprofit settings. Topics include marketing planning, implementation, and evaluation. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 388 Digital Analytics - 3 Hours

Students in this course will explore the different tools available for evaluating online and digital performance. Topics include text analytics, database analysis, digital analytics, online monitoring, and online behaviors. Emphasis will be on the application of analytic analysis including Search Engine Optimization and website effectiveness. Recommended prerequisite: COM 281. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 390 Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation - 3 Hours

Students in this course will be exposed to concepts in new venture creation for Entrepreneurial, Intrapreneurial, Social, and Non-Profit organizations. Specific concepts will cover idea generation, opportunity recognition, initiative taking, planning, financing, and functional area management. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 391 Entrepreneurial Accounting and Finance - 3 Hours

This course is designed to help students understand key accounting and financial concepts as they relate to start-up ventures. Concepts to be covered include financing options, working capital management, financial statements, and the time value of money. Brief coverage will also be given to personal financial management and to succession and retirement planning. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

BUS 392 Social Entrepreneurship - 3 Hours

This course focuses on preparing students to create and manage organizations that advance social change. Course content will cover the start-up, organization, and financing of enterprises with social purposes. The role of entrepreneurial activity as a means to generate economic growth and to alleviate poverty will also be covered. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

BUS 411 Financial Management - 3 Hours

An overview of the fundamentals of financial administration emphasizing the cost of capital, capital budgeting, cash budgeting, working capital management, and long-term sources and uses of funds. Prerequisites: knowledge of spreadsheet software and BUS 222 and PSY 285X. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

BUS 423 Management Information Systems - 3 Hours

Study of organizational systems that capture information from the major business processes and transaction cycles. The students will learn how various information technologies and business applications such as enterprise business systems, serve as the basis for the functional areas of accounting and business. Students will also learn strategies and solutions for addressing IT related issues within an organization. Offered fall semester, odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate.

BUS 426 Strategic Planning - 3 Hours

Utilizing case studies, students will develop and improve skills in the critical areas of applied organizational research and management of the strategic and operational planning process. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 430 Marketing Research - 4 Hours

This course provides concepts and experience in conducting marketing research projects to solve various business problems. Students will be exposed to key concepts in marketing research including research management, research design, data generation, data analysis and recommendations. Practical experience will be garnered through the team execution of an actual marketing research project. Laboratory is included. Prerequisite or corequisite: PSY 285X or permission of instructor. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 433 Marketing Strategy - 3 Hours

An analysis of the conceptual and theoretical developments related to marketing management and an appraisal of these developments in terms of their ability to facilitate understanding, production, and control of marketing. Application of the theoretical foundations will be made through case studies. Prerequisites: BUS 113 and junior or senior standing. Offered spring semester alternate years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate and Florida undergraduate.

BUS 440 Seminar in Management Policy - 3 Hours

A capstone course using the case study method to integrate the various disciplines of economics and management. Special emphasis is placed on the development of an analytical framework for building consistent and effective business strategy in domestic and international environments. Prerequisites: BUS 101 or BUS 111, BUS 113, BUS 115, BUS 221, and senior standing. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

BUS 445 Management Internship - 1-6 Hours

An integration of a business theory with practical experience in an organization. Appropriate internship experiences should provide students with the opportunity to practice, observe, and reflect upon the application of curricular concepts in organizational life. Particular topics for the program will be determined by the job, but must include managerial or related experiences. Before starting a practicum, the student must fill out an internship contract and personally meet with the internship coordinator to discuss academic assignments and expectations. At least 45 hours of work at the internship site must be completed for each hour of academic credit. The course may be repeated for up to twelve total hours of credit. Satisfies the professional experience requirement for business majors. Prerequisites: BUS 101 or BUS 111, BUS 113, BUS 115, BUS 221, permission of instructor, junior or senior standing, and approval of internship coordinator or department chair. Offered each semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 450 Independent Study - 1-4 Hours

Research and specialized studies designed to meet the needs of individual students. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Offered each semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

BUS 471 Leadership and Organizational Culture - 3 Hours

This course provides students with multiple perspectives on how to define and to analyze organizational culture. In light of this knowledge, students will learn how to adapt their leadership style to a variety of organizational settings and cultures. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 481 Organizational Ethics - 3 Hours

This course examines the nature of ethics and ethical decision making in both for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Students will also learn to apply passages and principles from the Bible to organizational case studies. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

BUS 490 Seminar in Business and Management Ethics - 3 Hours

An integration of Christian ethics particularly in the context of business and management situations. Students will be exposed to ethical decision-making considerations and will be challenged to apply them to case studies. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. This course fulfills the IDS 499X Integrative Thought Capstone requirement for students in the Business major. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CH 320 Biochemistry - 4 Hours

Structure, biosynthesis, and metabolism of common classes of biochemical compounds are studied. Laboratory is included. Prerequisites: CH 203 or CH 212; and BIO 111; or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

CH 420X Cell and Molecular Biology - 4 Hours

A detailed study of the structure and function of cells in their genetic, biochemical, developmental, physiological and pathophysiological aspects. This course introduces students to the relationships that exist between cell structure and biochemical processes necessary for eukaryotic cell growth, differentiation, and death. Laboratory included. Prerequisites: BIO 111 and CH 320. Laboratory fee. Offered spring semester in even-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Cross-listed with BIO 420X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

CH 5051 History of Christianity I - 3 Hours

This course explores the development of Christianity from its inception in the first century to the close of the Reformation era in the sixteenth century. Through a sympathetic engagement with primary and secondary historical sources, students will acquire a general understanding of the patristic period; the ecumenical councils; the emergence of medieval polity, philosophy and theology; the cultural synthesis of the high middle ages; the Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe; and the Protestant and Catholic Reformations.

CH 5052 History of Christianity II - 3 Hours

This course explores the development of Christianity from the post-Reformation era to the present day. Through a sympathetic engagement with primary and secondary historical sources, students will acquire a general understanding of the contributions of Protestant orthodoxy; Puritanism and Pietism; the rise of modern secularism; the proliferation of Protestant denominations; the "Enlightenment"; the Evangelical awakenings and revivals in Europe and North America; the Wesleyan movement; nineteenth century missionary expansion; the advance of Christianity in the majority world; modern Pentecostal Christianity; and current theological trends.

CH 5060 American Church History - 2 Hours

The transition of European churches to America and their involvement with theological, liturgical, social, and political issues; the nature of Puritanism; separation of church and state; awakenings and revivals; social concern; liberalism; fundamentalism; neo-orthodoxy; and contemporary evangelicalism are subjects of this course.

CH 5061 History of Christianity 1. The Patristic and Middle Ages - 2 Hours

This course explores the development of Christianity from its inception in the first century to the high Middle Ages (c. 1300). Through a sympathetic engagement with primary and secondary historical sources, students will acquire a general understanding of the patristic period; the ecumenical councils; the emergence of medieval polity, philosophy and theology; and the cultural synthesis of the high Middle Ages.

CH 5062 History of Christianity 2. The Age of Reform - 2 Hours

This course explores the development of Christianity from the high Middle Ages to the end of the 17th century. Through a sympathetic engagement with primary and secondary historical sources, students acquire a general understanding of the Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe; the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; missions to the New World; as well as the contributions of Protestant Orthodoxy, Puritanism, and Pietism.

CH 5063 History of Christianity 3. The Modern Age - 2 Hours

This course explores the development of Christianity from the late seventeenth century to the present day. Through a sympathetic engagement with primary and secondary historical sources, students acquire a general understanding of the rise of modern secularism, the proliferation of Protestant denominations, the ?Enlightenment?, the Evangelical awakenings and revivals in Europe and North America, the Wesleyan movement, the advance of Christianity in the majority world, modern Pentecostal Christianity, and current theological trends.

CH 7411 History of Free Church Movement - 2 Hours

A study of the emergence of the Free Church Movement as a vital force in European Christianity, the contributions of leading personalities to the free churches, the interplay of European pietism with the movement, and the spread of the movement to North America with special reference to the Evangelical Free Church of America.

CH 7450 The Church in Latin America, Africa, and Asia since 1500 - 2 Hours

A broad overview of the significant shift of the center of Christianity from the West to Latin America, Africa, and Asia. While consideration is given to early modern Roman Catholic missions and nineteenth and twentieth century Protestant missions, particular attention is focused on the role of indigenous Christians in the emergence and development of national churches.

CH 7477 MA Major Comprehensive Exam - 0-1 Hours

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some MA programs. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

CH 7485 MA Thesis - 0-2 Hours

MA thesis writers register for - 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as fulltime academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

CH 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for - 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

CH 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit/No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

CH 7513 Patristic Age - 2-3 Hours

Introduction to Christian life and thought between the close of the New Testament canon and the beginnings of the medieval period under Pope Gregory I (ca. 600) with emphasis on the major church fathers through primary and relevant secondary sources.

CH 7514 History of Christianity in the Medieval West - 2-3 Hours

This course provides an overview of ecclesiastical, political, and theological issues affecting (especially) Western Christianity from about 529 through 1453. Particular attention will be given to the development of the office of the bishop of Rome, the relation between empire and church, missions, monasticism, the philosophy and theology of scholasticism, factors affecting the development of conciliarism, and the so-called ?crisis? of the late Middle Ages. Master?s 2 hours; Doctoral 2+1 hours.

CH 7515 The Reformation Era - 2-3 Hours

This course provides a historical and theological overview of the sixteenth-century religious Reformations, and their long-term impact on Western Christianity. Topics covered include the condition of the late medieval church; the Lutheran, Zwinglian, and Calvinist Reformations; the rise of Anglicanism; the Anabaptists and other radical groups; and the Catholic/Counter Reformation. Master?s 2 hours; Doctoral 2+1 hours.

CH 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Preparation - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

CH 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Preparation - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

CH 7977 ThM Comprehensive Exam - 1 Hour

A department-specific major comprehensive exam required in some ThM concentrations. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the exam is passed; No Credit if the exam is failed or not completed.

CH 7980 MA Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

MA participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for 7980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a MA capstone research paper (MA/PR). Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded C- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

CH 8000 Seminar: Current Issues in the History of Christian Thought - 2-4 Hours

Topics chosen to interrelate the divisions of theology; attention focused on current issues or important neglected areas of Christian history and thought.

CH 8101 Classic Texts in the History of Christianity 1 - 2 Hours

This course offers students the opportunity to read and discuss some of the most important books of the classical intellectual tradition, exploring ways in which the insights and arguments of these authors have shaped intellectual life in Christian history up through the Reformation era. The professor facilitates class discussions and presents background materials to help students interpret these writings in their historical and intellectual contexts. Although the booklist may change from year to year, important authors considered will include Plato, Aristotle, Marcus Aurelius, Ponticus, Athanasius, Augustine, Boethius, Thomas Aquinas, Margery Kempe, Martin Luther, and John Calvin.

CH 8102 Classic Texts in the History of Christianity 2 - 2 Hours

This course offers students the opportunity to read and discuss some of the most important books of the classical intellectual tradition, exploring ways in which the insights and arguments of these authors have shaped intellectual life in Christian history from post-Reformation to the present. The professor facilitates class discussions and presents background materials to help students interpret these writings in their historical and intellectual contexts. Although the booklist may change from year to year, important authors considered will include Ren‚ Descartes, Blaise Pascal, Voltaire, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Wesley, Charles Darwin, Friedrich Schleiermacher, Friedrich Nietzsche, Karl Barth, Albert Camus, Martin Luther King, Jr., C.S. Lewis, Gustavo Guti‚rrez, Chinua Achebe, and Abigail Favale.

CH 8235 The Enlightenment - 2-3 Hours

This course introduces students to religious life and thought in Europe during the 18th century, with special consideration of English Deism, the French and German Enlightenments, and efforts by orthodox Christians to counter this philosophical tendency. Master?s 2 hours; doctoral 2+1 hours.

CH 8270 Protestant Thought in Nineteenth-Century America - 2-3 Hours

This course introduces students to the leading Protestant theologians and theological schools of 19th century America, with special attention to topics and issues most controversial among the schools. Emphasis on primary source readings from the New England theologians, the Mercersburg School, Old Princeton, Wesleyan/Holiness sources, and the New Theology. Master?s 2 hours; doctoral 2+1 hours.

CH 8280 History of Fundamentalism and Evangelicalism - 2-3 Hours

This course introduces students to the history of Fundamentalism and Evangelicalism, with particular reference to recent interpretations of these movements. Emphasis is placed on the question of Evangelical self-identity. Master?s 2 hours; doctoral 2+1 hours.

CH 8320 Martin Luther - 2-3 Hours

This course examines the life of the German reformer Martin Luther (1483-1546) in light of contemporary research and primary source materials. Special attention will be paid to important dimensions of his thought, including his view of justification; the Word, the sacraments, pastoral ministry, and the relationship of church and state. Master?s 2 hours; doctoral 2+1 hours.

CH 8330 John Calvin - 2-3 Hours

This course examines the life of the French reformer John Calvin (1509-1564) in light of contemporary research and primary source materials. Special attention will be paid to important dimensions of his religious thought, including his view of the knowledge of God, providence, Scripture, pastoral ministry, church discipline, and predestination. Master?s 2 hours; doctoral 2+1 hours.

CH 8361 Jonathan Edwards - 2-3 Hours

This course provides an introduction to the life, times, and especially the theology of Jonathan Edwards. Special attention will be given to an intensive reading in and reflection on Edwards?s most important writings, as well as his historical background (primarily in New England Puritanism) and historical legacy (with primary attention paid to the development of ?the New England Theology?). Master?s 2 hours; doctoral 2+1 hours.

CH 8415 The Forgotten Reformers - 2-3 Hours

A study of biography, theology, and legacy of important?yet too often ?forgotten??religious reformers of sixteenth-century Europe, drawn from primary sources and current secondary literature. Some of the church leaders treated may include Gasparo Contarini, Ignatius of Loyola, and Marguerite de Navarre (Catholic); Philip Melanchthon and Martin Chemnitz (Lutheran); Andreas Karlstadt (Lutheran-Radical); Martin Bucer, Heinrich Bullinger, and Theodore Beza (Reformed); Balthasar Hubmaier and Menno Simons (Anabaptist). Master?s 2 hours; Doctoral 2+1 hours.

CH 8435 French Protestant Theology 1515-1685 - 2-3 Hours

A survey of Protestant theology and religious practice in French-speaking Europe from the reign of Francis I (1515-47) to the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685). Particular attention will be paid to doctrinal development and debates as well as the religious struggles of French Protestants during this period. Highlighted will be the theology and role of prominent French ?Evangelicals? such as Jacques LefŠvre d?Etaples and Marguerite de Navaree; and important Protestant leaders such as Guillaume Farel, John Calvin, Theodore Beza, Jacob Arminius, Moise Amyraut, and Francis Turretin. Master?s 2 hours; Doctoral 2+1 hours.

CH 8465 Pastoral Ministry in the Reformation - 2-3 Hours

A study of the theology and practice of pastoral ministry in Protestant churches during the era of the Reformation. Special attention will be given to the body of scholarly literature related to the clerical office in early modern Europe, including local and regional studies of Protestant clergy and clerical institutions; and specialized studies of activities related to the pastoral vocation, including education, preaching, public worship, catechetical instruction, visitation, and moral discipline. Master?s 2 hours; Doctoral 2+1 hours.

CH 8490 Advanced Study in the Reformation - 2-3 Hours

A survey of the historiography of the sixteenth-century Reformation in Europe examining representative works by some of the most important contemporary scholars of the Reformation era. Special attention will be paid to different methodological approaches, including social, cultural, and economic history.

CH 8710 Advanced Study in American Christianity - 2-4 Hours

Historiographical analysis of important recent literature in the field of American religious history. This seminar's primary purpose will be to keep advanced students abreast of the state of the conversation within the discipline, enabling them to enter this conversation from the point of view of their own research. Two to four hours, doctoral as posted.

CH 8862 Origins of Modern Biblical Criticism in 17th & 18th Century - 4 Hours

A study of the multiple springs that fed the gathering stream of modern biblical criticism in the 17th and 18th centuries. Reference is made to the history of science, the history of philosophy, the history of book trade, and other disciplines. Particular attention is given to individuals such as Baruch Spinoza, Richard Simon, Jean Le Clerc, Reimarus, J. S. Semler, Lessing, Voltaire, and their critics. Course objectives include an improved understanding of the evangelical doctrine of biblical inspiration, the history of hermeneutics, and questions related to biblical authority.

CH 8911 Colloquium in Historical Methodology 1 - 1 Hour

A methodological colloquium team-taught by all regular and available faculty members in the department of church history. General issues of historical methodology are discussed, with a special emphasis placed on the relationship between Christian faith and historical understanding. Offered fall.

CH 8912 Colloquium in Historical Methodology 2 - 1 Hour

A methodological colloquium team-taught by all regular and available faculty members in the department of church history. Historical work of the students enrolled will be discussed with a view to improving that work by means of rigorous methodological analysis and to preparing the students enrolled for the writing of their theses. Offered spring.

CH 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for - 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. 177 Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.

CH 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-2 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for - 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as fulltime academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

CH 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for - 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

CH 9001 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. Available in all PhD programs. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours in PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS programs; may be repeated for a maximum of six hours in the PhD/THS program. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

CH 9011 Private Study - 0 Hours

In special circumstances, a student may register for one or more semesters of Private Study in order to meet the requirements for candidacy. Only for PhD/THS students in CH, NT, OT, ST departments. Counts as full-time student status when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week (half-time is 15 hours per week) are invested in doctoral study and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. May be repeated four times. No Credit.

CH 9890 Professional Development Practicum - 0-2 Hours

Participants design, conduct, and evaluate at least one professional development activity. Program participants may repeat the course multiple times, not to exceed a total of 2 hours over the course of the degree program. These integrative and generative activities could take the form of teaching, consulting, developing curriculum, coaching, pastoral ministries, grant writing, etc. Participants may propose non-Trinity or Trinity-related activities and opportunities. Each student is responsible to initiate conversations toward PDP planning with their program director prior to the semester in which the practicum will be conducted. All activities must be conducted after program matriculation. One credit hour is equivalent to approximately 35-40 hours of invested practicum work. Credit/No Credit.

CH 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat the course twice for a total of three hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat it once. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been 179 completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit/No Credit.

CH 9990 Dissertation Proposal Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. Only PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat this course twice for a total of 3 hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat this course once for a total of 3 hours. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

CH 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Course taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

CH 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.

CM 112 ADVANCE Formation Group - 0 Hours

Advance Formation Group is an intentional weekly experience under the leadership of a faculty member. As an essential part of the Advance Program, it seeks to create an environment of growth in personal spiritual life, relational skills, and ministry skills for the students in this program. Students are enrolled for 4-6 semesters. Regular attendance necessary for credit; only two absences per semester permitted. Credit/No Credit. Offered each semester for Deerfield Advance: Pre-Seminary Student. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

CM 172 Introduction to Ministry - 3 Hours

An introduction to the purposes, challenges, and scope of various types of ministries and ministry programs, with particular focus made in those areas in which we offer emphases. Personal contact and interaction with ministry leaders will seek to enlarge the vision of students for how ministry can be carried out. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Wisconsin Prison Initiative, and online.

CM 175 Foundations of Youth Ministry - 3 Hours

An exploration of biblical, educational, and philosophical foundations of youth ministry. Current youth culture and developmental needs of adolescents will be examined in light of these foundations. Students will be required to develop a personal theory of ministering to youth through biblical education, personal evangelism, and relational discipleship. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 181 Spiritual Formation - 3 Hours

This course explores the theoretical and practical aspects of Christian spiritual development. Special attention is given to understanding and participating in the spiritual disciplines - both personal and corporate. Prerequisites: BI 101 and BI 111. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

CM 201 Survey of Christian Education - 3 Hours

An introductory overview of the church's involvement in education, including the history, aims, methods, and principal agencies of Christian Education. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 210 Ministry in its Cultural Context - 3 Hours

An introduction to the theology, purposes, challenges, and scope of various types of ministries in their current cultural context. A particular emphasis is given to understanding philosophical and theological pluralism. Prerequisites: BI 101 and BI 111. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

CM 211 Theology and Practice of Pastoral Ministry - 3 Hours

A study of the theology, qualifications, practices, and vulnerabilities of pastoral ministry. A particular emphasis will be given to discussing how to maintain one's spiritual health despite various challenges and temptations in pastoral ministry. Prerequisites: BI 101 and BI 111. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

CM 215 Foundations of Children's Ministry - 3 Hours

A study of the elements involved in building effective children's and family ministries. In addition to the development of skills in curriculum evaluation, creative programming, and ministry training, students will be exposed to and interact with a variety of local children's ministry models. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 224 Integrated Field Experience - Spiritual Formation - 3 Hours

This course is designed to explore the theoretical foundations for personal growth and ministry issues, including spiritual growth and its application to character development. Students will participate in ministry roles during the semester for a total of 60 hours and additional weekly coursework. This course fulfills one (1) service learning requirement (equivalent to IDS 106) for each semester of enrollment with a grade of C or higher. Offered online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 225 Integrated Field Experience - Small Group Ministry - 3 Hours

An opportunity for students to be initiated into ministry leadership roles. Emphasis will be placed on discerning spiritual giftedness, sense of personal calling to ministry, individual leadership style, and on theoretical and experiential exploration of methods of small group ministries. Students will participate in Christian ministry roles during the semester for a total of 120 hours (60 hours for online students) and additional weekly coursework. Offered online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 235 Introduction to Chaplaincy - 3 Hours

This course provides an overview of the nature and history of institutional ministry. Students examine the biblical and theological foundations of chaplaincy and review the various organizations and settings that typically receive chaplain services (e.g., healthcare, military, correctional, workplace, industrial, university, residential facilities, public safety, sports, disaster relief). Additionally, this course explores leadership principles that contribute to success in chaplaincy as well as specialized skills in caregiving, pastoral ministry, and emotional/spiritual counseling support. The objective is to develop a basic understanding of how institutional gospel ministry makes a difference in governmental, non-profit, and corporate communities.

CM 250 Topics in Christian Ministries: - 1-3 Hours

Selected topics in Christian Ministry not taught under specific course title. May be repeated for credit if topic differs. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

CM 260 Introduction to Intercultural Ministry - 3 Hours

An introduction to the challenging opportunities and possibilities of involvement in intercultural ministries with specific emphasis placed on Christian missionary endeavors from historical, theological, and cultural perspectives. Students will be challenged to consider their individual roles in the global community. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 270 Worship: Theology and Practice - 3 Hours

This course explores the biblical theology of worship and survey the implications for planning Christian worship. Aspects covered include: worship in the Old Testament, the New Testament, and the early Church; the study of Christian worship through history, with special emphasis on Protestant and evangelical worship; the role of music, prayer, scripture reading, creeds, and preaching in the weekly gathering of Christians. Students compile an extensive bibliography of resources for worship planning, and demonstrate their grasp of the theological principles by writing a series of worship services. Delivery mode: Online.

CM 280 Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Family - 3 Hours

This course draws upon understandings of family from a range of social science perspectives and interacts with the related topics from a Christian integrative perspective. The disciplines of family process, psychology, and sociology reveal strengths and weaknesses that can be observed in healthy and unhealthy examples of this basic unit of society. Students will be challenged to wrestle with societal issues across time and into the present concerning the most intimate of human relationships. Offered online as scheduled. Delivery mode: online.

CM 315 Principles of Family Ministry - 3 Hours

This course centers on the ministry to children and their families. Focus will be on the theological foundations of the family, understanding the current cultural trends, which affect families, and developing effective ministry strategies with contemporary families in the context of local church and parachurch ministries. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 320 Principles of Ministry Programming - 3 Hours

A study of the elements and skills necessary in the design and development of effective programming for discipling ministries. Students are exposed to local ministry models and contemporary ministry principles. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 321 Theology and Practice of Evangelism - 3 Hours

A study of the theology and methodology of evangelism with particular emphasis on the gospel message and the biblical reasons for doing evangelism. Prerequisites: BI 101 and BI 111. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

CM 324 Integrated Field Experience: Discipleship - 3 Hours

An opportunity for students to participate in an intensive and advanced level of ministry leadership for a total of 120 hours for the semester. Emphasis will be placed on developing strategies for facilitating personal effectiveness and maturity as a Christian leader and study of the biblical principles and practical models of Christian discipleship. This course fulfills one (1) service learning requirement (equivalent to IDS 106) for each semester of enrollment with a grade of C or higher. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 325 Integrated Field Experience - Ministry Methods - 3 Hours

Students will participate in an intensive and advanced level of ministry leadership for a total of 120 hours over the course of the semester. Additional coursework will emphasize the development of practical ministry skills for the student's selected area of emphasis. The course fulfills one (1) service learning requirement (equivalent to IDS 106) for each semester of enrollment with a grade of C or higher. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 331 Theology and Practice of Discipleship - 3 Hours

A study of the theology and methodology of discipleship with particular emphasis on mentoring younger Christians in the faith. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

CM 335 Strategies for Discipling Ministries - 3 Hours

A study of biblical principles and practical models of Christian discipleship. Emphasis is on theoretical and experiential exploration of methods of small-group discipling ministries. Delivery mode: online.

CM 340 Principles of Relational Youth Ministry - 3 Hours

A study of effective communication with contemporary adolescents designed to enhance students' understanding and ability to build significant relationships with youth. Specific areas to be addressed include evangelistic contact ministry and paraprofessional counseling in response to adolescent issues. Course should not be taken if CM 342 has already been taken. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

CM 341 Theology and Practice of Leadership - 3 Hours

A study of the theology and methodology of Christian leadership with particular emphasis on a leader's character and the core functions of leadership. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

CM 342 Relational Skills for Ministry - 3 Hours

This theoretical and skill development course will be a study of effective communication within a ministry context. A basis will be established for understanding human communication, contact ministry, crisis management, and paraprofessional counseling. Specific focus will be given to legal issues, opportunities as well as limitations of the minister, and empowering others toward positive life change. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 345 Ministry Internship - 2-4 Hours

This course is designed to build upon earlier Integrated Field Experiences. Total credits for internships (including all Integrated Field Experiences) may not total more than 7 hours. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

CM 350 Topics in Christian Education - 1-3 Hours

Selected topics in Christian Education not taught under specific course title. May be repeated for credit if topic differs. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

CM 372X Nonprofit Management - 3 Hours

This course covers the theories and principles unique to managing ministries and not-for-profit social services organizations. Special emphasis is placed on the recruitment and management of volunteers and on effective development and utilization of volunteer boards of directors. Cross-listed with BUS 372X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 373X Nonprofit Financial Management - 3 Hours

This course covers basic concepts in managing finances for nonprofit organizations. Basic accounting topics covered include budgeting, expense control, and measurement in tax-exempt corporations. In addition, the course covers fundraising practices, including annual funding, capital campaigns, planned giving, special events, and grant proposal approaches and procedures. Ethical implications of fundraising and a survey of laws and regulations are also presented. Cross-listed with BUS 373X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online, and Florida undergraduate.

CM 375X Foundations of Christian Counseling - 3 Hours

Principles and techniques of counseling in ministry settings with a focus on counselor characteristics, problem-management skills, common counseling problems, multicultural dynamics, and various issues involved in the counseling process. Special emphasis is placed on the unique contribution of biblical truths to counseling. Cross-listed with PSY 375X. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate, Wisconsin Prison Initiative, and Online.

CM 381 Introduction to Preaching - 3 Hours

This course studies the basic development of preaching and sermon techniques to enhance the presentation of truth for evangelism and discipleship. It includes interactive learning and preaching opportunities to apply practical preaching design, Biblical principles, and contemporary applications. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

CM 400 Principles of Adult Ministry - 3 Hours

Designed to help students understand and appreciate the psychological and sociological characteristics of adults and develop a philosophy of adult ministry. Students engage in research and discussion of various phases of adult responsibility, ministry and problems in the local church, society and home. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 420 Ministry Leadership - 2 Hours

This course seeks to integrate the students' ministry experiences with leadership training. Students will focus on understanding the biblical concept of leadership, assessing leadership style and skills, examining principles of team building and team management in discipling ministries. The course also examines issues that leaders commonly confront in churches and organizations. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 446 Reflective Internship in Christian Ministries - 3 Hours

A capstone course for the Christian Ministries major designed to help students integrate biblically based Christian ministry principles, concepts, and skills and apply them to actual church or parachurch experiences in a mentored ministry context. Case study methodology will be utilized to aid reflection. Prerequisites: (1) BI 101, BI 111, and BI 210 and (2) completion of a four-course concentration in Christian Ministries. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

CM 450 Independent Study - 1-4 Hours

Research and specialized studies designed to meet the needs of individual students. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

CM 480 Christian Ministries Integrative Seminar - 1 Hour

This course, offered in a retreat format, helps students provide closure for their experiences in the Christian Ministries program. Emphasis is placed on integrating the whole of their experiences at Trinity. Open only to CM majors in their last two semesters of coursework at TIU. Prerequisite: Community First Aid and CPR certification or equivalent. This fulfills the IDS 499X Integrative Thought Capstone requirement for students in the Christian Ministries major. Course fee. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

CM 5000 Introduction to Counseling Ministries - 2 Hours

An introduction to the principles, and techniques involved in the pastoral ministry of care and counseling. The course emphasizes basic counseling skills and ability to relate to others. Biblical, theological, and ethical concerns in pastoral care ministry are discussed and an overview of common counseling concerns is presented. Course format includes lecture, video, role play, and discussion. Not applicable to MA in MHC. Offered fall and spring.

CM 6000 Issues in Counseling Ministries - 1-3 Hours

Issues of interest related to pastoral counseling and counseling in ministry settings will be presented. Topics vary and are on a rotating basis. They include Spiritual Formation and Counseling, Couples Counseling, Crisis Counseling, Bereavement Counseling, and Pastoral Counseling for Guilt, Shame, and Depression. May be repeated. Offered fall and spring.

CM 7478 MA Capstone Project - 0-3 Hours

A department-specific summative program project (MA/E, MA/CMC) as arranged with the department of concentration. Not available in all programs.

CM 7940 Clinical Pastoral Education - 2 Hours

The Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) (www.acpe.edu) provides education related to pastoral care through the clinical educational methods of Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE). The CPE experience is supplemented with TEDS faculty supervision, reading and case explorations with a cohort. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: MACMC candidacy and consent of department. Two hours.

CO 5210 Counseling Skills Training - 2-3 Hours

An experiential and cognitive introduction to the skills basic to any counseling setting, working with a developmental model of helping. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition and use of the basic counselling skills through an experiential participation in the counseling process. Not open to auditors. MA in Mental Health Counseling and MA in Chaplaincy and Ministry Care degrees require that this course be taken for 3 credit hours.

CO 5310 Counseling Strategies: Theory, Treatment, and Technique - 3 Hours

Classical and current theories of counseling will be investigated in light of Scripture, psychological sophistication, and potential application for evidence-based practice and treatment. Strategies will be explored to formulate case conceptualization, build treatment plans, and select in-session helping techniques.

CO 5400 Foundations of Mental Health Counseling - 3 Hours

This is an orientation to the various dimensions of mental health counseling. It provides an overview of the variety of roles offered and functions available to the mental health worker in society and in the church. The central theme to explore is what it means to pursue a professional identity, answer a ministry calling and nurture a Christian theological imagination. This provides a forum to guide Christians who counsel to engage peacefully and ethically with others in a pluralistic culture. Registration limited to MA/MHC students or by departmental permission.

CO 5578 Family and Couple Counseling - 3 Hours

The foundations and various theoretical perspectives of family systems and couple counseling are examined. Attention is also given to specific aspects of couple and family treatment, such as family development, contemporary culture/societal issues, as well as specific presenting problems-infidelity, domestic violence, divorce/remarriage, step-families and personality disorders. Note: MA in CMC/MDiv students in this course will have an alternative assignment to enhance ministry application.

CO 6000 Current Studies in Counseling - 1-3 Hours

Issues of interest related to pastoral counseling and counseling in ministry settings will be presented. Topics vary and are on a rotating basis. They include Spiritual Formation and Counseling, Couples Counseling, Crisis Counseling, Bereavement Counseling, and Pastoral Counseling for Guilt, Shame, and Depression. May be repeated. Offered fall and spring.

CO 6110 Career Counseling - 3 Hours

The many facets of career counseling are explored. The subject will be covered from both theoretical and practical points of view. Holistic awareness of individuals will be considered in regard to how people deal with their vocational needs and goals.

CO 6120 Addiction Counseling - 3 Hours

This course examines the treatment of addictions. The philosophy, mechanisms, and physiology of substance abuse and chemical dependency are surveyed. Students will be exposed to relevant and effective approaches to counsel the person with an addiction. Important topics related to counseling are covered, such as relapse prevention, adolescent substance abuse, dual diagnosis, and family issues.

CO 6130 Group Counseling - 3 Hours

The processes, principles, and techniques related to contemporary forms of group counseling will be explored. An experiential component in this course fosters the development of group leadership skills. Not open to auditors. Prerequisite: CO 5210.

CO 6510 Human Growth and Development - 3 Hours

The theories of individual, family, and personality development across the lifespan will be reviewed. How various aspects (e.g. learning, environmental, cognitive, biological, spiritual) of human development affect human functioning are examined. The course will facilitate a general framework for understanding interventions for differing abilities as well as contemplate strategies that promote resilience and optimum development and wellness across the lifespan.

CO 6530 Child & Adolescent Counseling - 2-3 Hours

A conceptual framework for working with child and adolescent clients will be introduced along with a review of techniques developmentally appropriate for assessment and treatment plan formulation and implementation. Treatment approaches to specific childhood and adolescent mental health disorders will be examined.

CO 6610 Human Sexuality - 3 Hours

This course will deal with the physiological, psychological, and spiritual aspects of human sexuality, with particular emphasis on counseling-related issues.

CO 6640 Gender Issues - 2-3 Hours

Examines and discusses issues that are pertinent to gender. Implications for counseling are emphasized.

CO 6650 Multicultural Issues in Counseling - 3 Hours

This course examines the nature and effects of culture and ethnicity on the counseling process. The effects of worldview on diversity issues in counseling will be discussed with a special reference to a Christian worldview. Counseling issues specific to various minority populations will be addressed through case vignette and lecture.

CO 6710 Counseling and Theological Worldview: Faith and Practice - 3 Hours

This biblical-theological sequence capstone course surveys issues, models, methods and criticisms regarding the interface of empirically-based counseling with a biblically-grounded Christian theology. The course covers current literature on faith-based, spiritually-sensitive clinical approaches to familiarize the student with the process of integration and case studies to facilitate personal skill development in this crucial area.

CO 6720 Ethics & Issues in Counseling - 3 Hours

Ethical standards of the American Counseling Association are evaluated in the context of current mental health practice, professional requirements and legal standards. The major faith-based mental health associations, AACC and CAPS, Codes of Ethics are also considered. Practical applications of ethical guidelines are discussed using case vignettes. Registration limited to MA/MHC students or by departmental permission.

CO 6950 Counseling Practicum - 2-3 Hours

Practicum is designed as a pre-internship fieldwork experience with group supervision on campus. It will provide students with practical supervised experience in various counseling settings. The student will average six to eight hours per week involvement. May be repeated. Prerequisites: MA in MHC Candidacy and consent of CO Department. Cap 6 per section.

CO 6955 Group Leadership Practicum - 2 Hours

Open to students who have demonstrated proficiency in the use of basic counseling skills in the CO 5210 Counseling Skills course. Students are required to be involved in the direct training of CO 5210 students under the supervision of the course professor, to meet outside of class for supervision, and to complete reading and written assignments in the area of group leadership. May be repeated. Consent of the instructor required for registration.

CO 7160 Community Counseling - 2 Hours

Counselors provide consultation services in community settings that extend beyond direct client service. The distinctions between counseling and consultation will be explored, as well as the major models and process stages for implementation. Case studies will be utilized to demonstrate explicit program development applications for educational crisis and system-level interventions, and furthering social objectives. Pastoral and church consultation will be an area of focus.

CO 7210 Assessment and Evaluation - 3 Hours

This course covers the measurement concepts and practice techniques required for the use of standardized and non-standardized assessment tools utilized in diagnosis, treatment planning and evaluation. Procedures for test selection, administration and interpretation are examined for measures of ability, aptitude, personality, and psychopathology. Prerequisite: MA in MHC candidacy or consent of department chair. A $45 materials testing fee is assessed for this course.

CO 7278 Strategies of Marriage & Family Therapy - 3 Hours

An exploration of the specific perceptual, conceptual, and intervention skills of prominent approaches in the field of marriage and family therapy. These approaches include Bowen, Minuchin, Whitaker, Satir, Milan, and Haley. Prerequisite: CO 5578.

CO 7330 Counseling Techniques - 2-3 Hours

A unique combination of theory and practice, the class helps students to enter into the world of counseling practice. Counseling Techniques utilizes contemporary treatment models, along with traditional approaches, to enhance student skills in helping people. Prerequisite: CO 5210.

CO 7450 Psychopathology - 3 Hours

This course is an advanced course dealing with the etiology, classification, and treatment of various mental disorders. Diagnostic skill in using the current DSM classifications and criteria is achieved through the use of case vignettes and lecture. Registration limited to MA/MHC students or by departmental permission.

CO 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit/No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

CO 7710 Spiritual Direction, Formation and Soul Care - 2 Hours

Counseling as therapeutic dialogue can produce change beyond the remediation of mental health concerns. This course explores how counseling can become a trialogue (counselor/seeker/Holy Spirit) that furthers Christian identity development, sanctification, and the practice of spiritual disciplines. Themes such as spiritual development/direction, integrated interiority, and soul care will be examined. Prerequisite CO 6710.

CO 7900 Research Methods - 3 Hours

An introduction to research design, investigating quantitative, qualitative, mixed-method designs, action research models, and program evaluation. Emphasis is given to evaluating and employing research for use in clinical practice. Students will gain experience in portions of the research process, including designing and reporting. Review of statistics and most relevant statistical tests is included.

CO 7905 Advanced Research Methods - 2 Hours

The topic of the course is more complex research designs and techniques and will include information about statistics and statistical computer packages. Prerequisite: CO 7900. Offered on demand.

CO 7961 Mental Health Counseling Internship I - 2-3 Hours

Internship is designed to give counseling students supervised counseling experience. Approved intern sites include hospital inpatient programs, community counseling agencies, counseling centers, and other mental health facilities. The internship may begin in summer or fall semesters (CO 7961) depending on the site requirements. It must extend through the spring semester (CO 7962). CO 7961 and CO 7962 require a combined total of 900 hours of internship involvement including 360 direct service hours. Individual supervision is provided on site; group supervision is provided on campus. CO 7961 and CO 7962 must be taken consecutively over the course of one academic year and total six semester hours. CO 7961 is offered in summer and fall only. Considered full-time academic status. Prerequisites: CO 6950, MA in MHC candidacy and consent of department. When taken in summer for two semester hours, may be repeated in fall for two semester hours.

CO 7962 Mental Health Counseling Internship II - 2-3 Hours

This is an advanced internship experience building on skills and requirements from CO 7961. CO 7962 is offered in spring only. Considered full-time academic status. Prerequisite CO 7961.

CO 7969 International Counseling Experience - 3 Hours

This course is designed for those primarily invested in returning to an international setting where they have prior exposure, language fluency, and mental health connections. International students, who are not exclusively seeking U.S. licensure, may benefit from a supervised international counseling experience. Individual onsite supervision is required as well as special arrangements with the department. All syllabus requirements for CO 7961/7962 will be applied with flexibility and the application of technology. Full-time academic status. Prerequisites: MA in MHC candidacy and consent of department. May be repeated for credit.

CO 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Preparation - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

CO 8000 Seminar: Current Issues - 1-4 Hours

Consideration of contemporary issues in professional and ministry counseling. Recent titles include the following: Clinical Consulting, Grief Therapy, and Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. Prerequisites: degree candidacy or consent of department chair. May be repeated.

CO 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for - 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. 177 Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.

CO 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-3 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for - 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as fulltime academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

CO 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for - 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

COM 112 Speech - 3 Hours

Principles of effective oral communication. Experience in preparation and delivery of several original addresses. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

COM 210X Business Communication - 3 Hours

This course covers the fundamentals of both written and oral communication in the contemporary marketplace. It includes theory while emphasizing practical and varied applications simulating a broad range of professional and organizational situations. Particular attention is given to persuasive writing, oral presentations, collaboration, and the appropriate use of technology. Prerequisite: ENG 106 or equivalent. Cross-listed with ENG 210X. Delivery mode: online, and Florida undergraduate.

COM 281X Social and Interactive Media Strategies - 3 Hours

An analysis of audience research strategies, conceptualization of message contexts, message design, and content marketing. Brand development and maintenance across various communication channels will be examined.

COM 330 Intercultural Communication - 3 Hours

Cultural-based differences regarding communication styles, lifestyles, and ideology are explored, as well as the history and current experiences of some ethnic groups represented in the United States. Emphasis is given to overcoming cultural barriers and enhancing intercultural communication. Offered each year for Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

COM 332 Interpersonal Communication - 3 Hours

An examination of interpersonal communication theories and the application of those theories to specific interpersonal dyads, such as colleagues, friends, and spouses. Original research in the area of interpersonal communication will be conducted. Delivery mode: online.

COM 335 Intercultural Communication in a Global Context - 3 Hours

Culture-based differences regarding communication, values, lifestyles, and leadership are explored. Emphasis is given to overcoming barriers and embracing intercultural communication. Special attention is paid to the global nature of organizations and the impact of culture in the work environment. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

CRJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice - 3 Hours

This course provides an overview of the history and operations of the U.S. criminal justice system. Attention will be placed on law enforcement, prosecutors, public defender, the judiciary and the correctional process. This course will also evaluate the impact of crime on society and basic criminal law. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 201 Criminal Law and Procedure - 3 Hours

This course covers the principle areas of criminal law and of criminal procedure including federal restraints on the activities of law enforcement personnel. Students will examine the tenets of basic criminal law such as reus, mens rea, and general doctrines attempt, complicity, causation, and conspiracy. The course also examines legal authority of law enforcement personnel and rights of the accused person. Consideration is given to various procedural stages from criminal charges through post-conviction appeal. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 210 Criminal Courts - 3 Hours

This course presents how cases are processed in state and federal criminal courts, including venues, the study of prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, jury selection, plea bargaining and sentencing. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

CRJ 255X Constitutional Law - 3 Hours

An examination of the American constitutional system with special emphasis given to the role of judicial institutions and the impact of Supreme Court decisions. Offered spring semester even years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Cross listed with POL 255X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate and Florida undergraduate.

CRJ 300 Legal Writing and Communication - 3 Hours

This course focuses on skills related to analysis and objective explanation in the context of criminal justice. Students will examine individual cases and reports to analyze decisions and understand precedential value and legal reasoning as well as synthesize the results of several cases to understand larger principles and predict how the law will apply in future cases. Students will draft documents and provide oral reports on a variety of topics such as crime investigation reports, evidence collection reports, correctional incidents, substance abuse reports, motions, complaints and legal briefs. Prerequisite: ENG 106. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 324X Criminology - 3 Hours

A study of individual and community factors as they relate to cause and correction. Theories in their historical context are integrated with the present-day perspective of prevention and treatment. The roles of the church, the courts, the governments, and other community agencies will be considered. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Online and Florida undergraduate.

CRJ 325 Police, Technology, and Society - 3 Hours

This course examines complexities of modern policing including: the psychological, sociological, and philosophical role of the police as it relates to topics such as criminal behavior, police brutality, corruption, and stress, as well as modern technology police use to aid in carrying out their goals of preventing and investigating crime. Offered odd spring semesters starting spring 2023. Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

CRJ 330 Corrections - 3 Hours

This course provides an in-depth consideration of probation, penology, the theories of punishment, and community supervision sectors of the field of criminal justice. Alternatives to institutionalization are explored. Offered fall semester even years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Prerequisite: CRJ 201. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 350 Topics in Criminal Justice - 3 Hours

Selected topics as announced. Course may be repeated with a different topic. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 or permission of instructor. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 351 Drugs, Alcohol, and Crime - 3 Hours

This course will explore the relationship of substance use and crime. Topics include how drug trafficking impacts communities and the effectiveness of current policies aimed at controlling drug use. Prerequisite: CRJ 201. Offered spring semester even years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 352 Cybercrime - 2 Hours

This course examines legal and policy issues before developing from cybersecurity threats. Topics include digital foreign espionage, website hacking, intellectual property theft, and breaches of corporate databases. Focus will be placed on the governance of the Internet, as it relates to the roles of the government and non-governmental actors, and the expectations of privacy. Prerequisite: CRJ 201. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 360 Race, Gender, Ethnicity, and Criminal Justice - 3 Hours

This course focuses on gender, race, and ethnicity issues in the criminal justice system. The course emphasizes developing an understanding of cross-cultural variation; the effects of gender and race on the lives of people within the context of contemporary issues of justice. Prerequisite: CRJ 201. Offered spring semester even years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 361 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency - 3 Hours

This course examines the juvenile justice system and the impact of various legal, social, and political policies of at-risk youth, including child-trafficking. Students will conduct an assessment of causal theory and problems of corrections and prevention of delinquency. Prerequisite: CRJ 201. Offered spring semester even years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 410 Criminal Courts - 3 Hours

This course presents how cases are processed in state and federal criminal courts, including venues, the study of prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, jury selection, plea bargaining and sentencing. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 420 Police Response to Protests, Riots, and Disasters - 3 Hours

This course will examine the theories of behavior and action. Focus will be placed on how law enforcement should respond to protests, riots, disasters, and threats to social order. Prerequisite: CRJ 201. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

CRJ 445 Criminal Justice Internship - 3-12 Hours

This course is field experience to further the student?s integration of theory and practice. It is for junior and senior standing criminal justice majors whose academic performance is appropriate for placement. Potential placements include federal, state, county, and municipal criminal justice, law enforcement, law firms, corrections, administrative law agencies, residential treatment facilities, or related offices or agencies. At least 45 hours of work at the internship site must be completed for each hour of academic credit. The course may be repeated for up to twelve total hours of credit. Satisfies the professional experience requirement for criminal justice majors. Offer on demand. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

CRJ 450 Independent Study - 1-4 Hours

Research and specialized studies to meet the needs of individual students. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 451 Legal Issues in Technology - 3 Hours

This course examines how new technologies are transforming the experience, regulation, and meaning of personal privacy. This course will study U.S. courts' evolving reaction to challenges presented by digital surveillance with a focus on Fourth Amendment case law and key statutes. The topics explored will include database searches, GPS trackers, and the National Security Agency's telephonic metadata program. Prerequisite: CRJ 201. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 460 Victimology and Restorative Justice - 3 Hours

This course examines the relationship between victims and their offenders, the interactions between victims and the criminal justice system, the impact of the crime on families of the victims, and the connections between victims and other social groups and institutions. Additional discussion on Christian views of reconciliation and reintroducing offenders to society. Prerequisite: CRJ 201. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CRJ 470 Undergraduate Research - 1-4 Hours

A course involving investigation of a research problem under faculty supervision. Course requirements may include a literature survey, research, a written formal report, and oral presentation of results in criminal justice seminar. Offered on demand. Deerfield traditional undergraduate. May be repeated for credit.

CRJ 490 Criminal Justice Seminar - 3 Hours

This course serves as the capstone course for Criminal Justice major. Students will be challenged to incorporate learning from throughout the curriculum, culminating in the development of a comprehensive integration paper. Course content focuses on ethical decision-making by criminal justice practitioners. Distinctions are made between Christian and non-Christian perspectives. This course fulfills the IDS 499X requirements for Criminal Justice majors. Prerequisites: CRJ 201, SOC 324, and senior standing. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

CS 112 Intermediate Spreadsheets, Databases, and Word Processing - 2 Hours

Advanced features of word-processing and spreadsheet software, and an introduction to database software and web page design.

CS 230 Applied Computer Technology - 3 Hours

Concerns the logic and reasoning necessary to make effective use of digital technology. Students will learn many of the issues and questions that must be addressed to make the best use of common computer applications such as communications, spreadsheets, word processing, databases, multimedia, and Internet design and research. Lab fee will be charged. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

ED 104 Introduction to Education - 3 Hours

A survey of education in the United States from historical, philosophical, and sociological perspectives. Attention is given to the role of education in a culturally diverse society. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement). Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 110 Certified Childcare Professional Credential I - 5 Hours

Initial steps in creating an ePortfolio to include a portion of 180 clock hours of training, a portion of 720 hours of professional experience, letters of recommendation, writing samples and an observation at the workplace. This course will satisfy Florida DCF's FCCPC teacher requirement for educators of childcare programs. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduates.

ED 111 Certified Childcare Professional Credential II - 5 Hours

?Continuation of the building of an ePortfolio to completion 180 clock hours of training and to completion of 720 hours of professional experience, letters of recommendation, writing samples and an observation at the workplace. This course will satisfy Florida DCF's FCCPC teacher requirement for educators of childcare programs. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduates.

ED 230 Introduction to Special Education - 3 Hours

A survey course considering the gifted and those challenged by mental retardation, visual impairment, hearing impairment, learning disabilities, physical problems, behavior problems, speech and language development and those who are culturally disadvantaged. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement). Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 234 Children's Literature for Elementary Educators - 3 Hours

A survey and critical study by genre of literature for children. Integrates culturally diverse literature. Does not fulfill a humanities General Education requirement. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 257 Technology for Elementary Educators - 3 Hours

The utilization of educational technology, with an emphasis on individual and cooperative learning, integration of disciplines, and learning styles. Students become familiar with application software, teaching methods, and unit and lesson planning that integrate technology in the elementary classroom. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement). Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 260X Educational Psychology/Human Development - 3 Hours

A survey of the theories and philosophies of learning and human development in children and adolescents. Emphasis is placed on the cognitive processes associated with learning and the factors that influence motivation and engagement of children and adolescents. The learning and motivation of diverse populations is addressed through the lens of Universal Design for Learning. Prerequisite: three credit hours in psychology and at least sophomore standing. Cross-listed with PSY 260X. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 305 Reading Fundamentals - 3 Hours

Theories and methodologies for understanding the reading process and facilitating effective reading instruction in grades K-6. It includes the development of comprehension, vocabulary and word attacking skills. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite IDS 105 (core requirement) and ED 339. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 307 Elementary Art Education - 2 Hours

Prepares meaningful and creative art activities for an elementary classroom. Principles, materials, and methods of art for elementary children are compared. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite IDS 105 (core requirement) and ED 399. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 315 National Administrator Credential - 3 Hours

?Methods and materials for training for an early childhood program or center administrator. Topics include best practices for topics such as child care history, effective organizations, internal and external systems, legal, human resources, educational programming, marketing and public relations, financial management, operational planning, and advocacy. This course will satisfy Florida DCF's Overview of Childcare Management requirement for directors of childcare programs.? Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduates.

ED 330 Introduction to Special Education - 3 Hours

A survey of the history, practices, and challenges of special education, including an overview of the court cases and laws leading to IDEA and how these laws affect children with disabilities. This course addresses the cognitive, emotional, physical, and sensory needs of students with disabilities. Emphasis is placed on identification of individual needs, including tiered support systems, and appropriate resources, collaborative teams, concerns of families and appropriate planning for Individualized Education Programs (IEP). This course also addresses the use of assistive technology and digital tools to address student needs and maximize learning. Candidates complete a minimum of 12 hours of special education field experience. Verification of successful completion of field component is required for education candidates to pass this course. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 332 Reading: Literacy Development and Assessment - 3 Hours

Advanced application of theory and methodology of reading instruction in grades K-6, including assessment issues and prescriptions to increase reading performance. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement). Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 339 Fundamentals of Elementary Education - 3 Hours

Presentation of the basic principles of teaching, classroom management, lesson plans, unit building, instructional methods, and use of materials in various content areas. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement). Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 344 Social Studies Methods in the Elementary Classroom - 3 Hours

A course encompassing the scope, content resources, methods, and interdisciplinary application of teaching social studies in the elementary classroom. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement) and ED 339. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 346 Elementary Science Methods - 3 Hours

A study of the methods of teaching science in the elementary school, with particular emphasis on the topics organization and administration of science in grades K-6. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement) and ED 339. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 347 Elementary Math Methods - 3 Hours

A survey of the teaching of mathematics, including discussion of the role of math education in society as well as the process, basic principles, and philosophies of math education in grades K-6. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement) and ED 339. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 348 Elementary Music Education - 2 Hours

Methods and materials for teaching the fundamentals of music on the elementary level. Music literature is surveyed and evaluated. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement) and ED 339. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 351 Language Arts Methods - 3 Hours

Methods and materials for teaching language, writing, vocabulary development, spelling and handwriting. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement) and ED 339. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 355 Health and Physical Education Methods - 2 Hours

A study of methods and content of teaching health and physical education in grades K-6. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement) and ED 339. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 400 Student Teaching in the Elementary School - 9 Hours

Observation and teaching in an elementary school classroom under direct supervision of a qualified cooperating teacher and a college instructor. This capstone experience is designed to aid the student teacher to bring together theory and practice. This course requires twelve weeks of observing/teaching in a classroom and participating in a student teaching seminar. During the semester of student teaching, the student must be available during regular school hours and not be employed full-time. This is an intense time of work, and student-teachers must give full attention to teaching. The student must have all core courses completed, and no other coursework may be taken during the student teaching experience. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement). Nine hours. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 401 Clinical Practice in the Elementary School - 12 Hours

This internship experience in classroom teaching under the direction of a qualified, cooperating teacher provides candidates with the opportunity to apply teaching principles in local schools through supervised observations and teaching. All candidates must meet the requirements for clinical practice outlined in the Division of Education Handbook and all Illinois State Board of Education requirements for student teaching. Prerequisites: Admission to Clinical Practice (Gate 4). Course Fee. Offered spring semester, fall by permission only. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

ED 404 ESOL Methods - 3 Hours

This course is an overview of curriculum, instructional methods and materials, testing and evaluation, and cross-cultural communication processes and linguistic principles as related to instructing English Language Learners (ELLs) in the K-6 classroom. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 407 Science for Educators - 3 Hours

This course is a study of specific science content skills required for K-6 teachers by the FLDOE competencies and skills and national/state/district content standards. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 408 Social Studies for Educators - 3 Hours

This course is a study of specific social studies skills required for K-6 teachers by the FLDOE accomplished practices, competencies and skills, and national/state/district common core standards. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 410 Florida Clinical Educator Training - 3 Hours

This course provides direct training for an educator to become a Florida state-approved peer coach and clinical supervisor of candidates in field experience and student teaching. This course develops clinical skills for the following: diagnosis of professional performance, diagnosis of student performance, feedback, and professional development plans. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate. Credit Hours: 3.

ED 411 Multisensory Literacy Approaches and the Exceptional Student - 1 Hour

This course teaches educators how specific multisensory approaches can dramatically improve struggling students' language skills and outcomes in elementary through high school. Topics covered include creating a positive classroom environment conducive to learning, helping students develop skills in key areas through multisensory approaches such as phonological awareness, letter knowledge, phonics, fluency, spelling, vocabulary, and comprehension. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 412 Assessments in Special Education - 1 Hour

This course covers methods and materials used in assessing students who may be eligible for special education. Class sessions will involve experiential learning activities related to the assessment of students. This course includes technical prerequisites for understanding standardized assessments and the rationale for using curriculum-based measurement (CBM) within the broad context of special education programming. Students will develop competencies in utilizing norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, curriculum-based, and teacher-made assessments for instructional and placement decisions. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 414 Teaching Approaches for Students with Dyslexia - 1 Hour

This course provides teachers with evidence-based practices for teaching children who have dyslexia and related written language disorders. The course presents the basic linguistic structures of written English related to reading and spelling. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 416 Teaching Reading in the Content Areas - 3 Hours

This course will provide students with strategies and tools for becoming a facilitating reflective practitioner, teaching reading across content areas and helping students discover that content area learning is made richer when reading, writing, speaking, and listening are taught together. Particular emphasis will be place on a balanced approach to reading where reading and writing are in alignment in lessons. Also, important to this course is helping students to think critically along with the appropriate use of texts and media. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 418 Teaching Reading and Writing to Students with Specific Learning Disabilities - 3 Hours

This course will cover instructional principles and specific methodologies that are valuable in educating students with specific learning disabilities in varied settings. Focus will be on developing literacy skills including phonemic awareness, word recognition, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and writing skills using developmentally appropriate materials. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 419 Reading Strategies for Elementary Students with Learning Difficulties: Strategies for Response to Intervention - 1 Hour

A practical, research-based course focused on effective reading strategies for teaching students with reading difficulties. The course covers tiered instruction needs in the RTI tiers. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 423 Classroom Management for Elementary Educators - 3 Hours

Identification of developmentally appropriate models and strategies for guiding, disciplining, and managing students' behavior; developing intrinsic motivation and conflict resolution skills; identifying environmental influences on behaviors of students from all cultures and familial situations. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 424 Teaching Students with Autism in the Inclusive Classroom - 3 Hours

Strategies to address the varied social and academic needs of students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in the inclusive classroom. In this course, students will explore functional behavior assessment from which to develop and implement a behavior intervention plan. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 426 Behavior Solutions in the Inclusive Classroom - 1 Hour

This course covers the possible causes of specific special needs behaviors along with possible solutions to be implemented. This course will help teachers develop a toolbox of in-the-moment solutions and also learn what children may be communicating and why. Behavior problems discussed include out-of-seat behavior, fidgeting, hand-flapping, covering ears, hiding or running away, difficulty with class work, and more. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 431 Assessment of Learners - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the educational levels and needs of all students, including exceptional, culturally and/or linguistically diverse, and at-risk students. Standardized achievement tests, diagnostic/prescriptive tests and curriculum-based assessments are included. Use of test results in program planning is emphasized. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 435 ESOL Curriculum and Materials Development - 3 Hours

This course will give students the opportunity to explore strategies to take curriculum from a typical elementary classroom and adapt it for English Language Learners (ELL). Students will also write lesson plans specifically created to raise the language skills of ELLs. Students will have an opportunity to teach lessons they create in the course as well. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 436 Applied Linguistics: ESOL - 3 Hours

This course gives a practical approach to teaching English to speakers of other languages. Includes general linguistics, language theory, principles of language acquisition and techniques for teaching sounds, word structure, and sentence structure to PK-6 ESOL students. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 438 Cultural Dimensions of ESOL - 3 Hours

An examination of how issues of race and ethnicity affect the values and ethics of American society and its citizens. This course satisfies one of the core requirements of the ESOL endorsement. Students will teach a multi-content lesson in view of intercultural perspectives. A professional growth chart will be developed in light of what is learned in this course regarding the many types of diversity. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 439 Testing and Evaluation of ESOL - 3 Hours

This course will review basic types of assessments and assessment vocabulary. The focus of the course will be on specific types of assessments which are applicable to English Language Learners (ELL). How assessment can drive instruction for the ELL student will be a point of discussion. Laws regulating students as they take high stakes tests and other assessments that are part of a typical elementary school program will be addressed. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 442 Autism: The Temple Gradin Perspective - 1 Hour

Dr. Temple Grandin, a professor at Colorado State University, is a world-renowned autism spokesperson and consultant to the livestock industry on animal behavior. She is widely celebrated as one of the first individuals on the autism spectrum to publicly share insights from her personal experience of autism. Dr. Grandin has written extensively from both her research in and her personal experience with autism. This course examines autism from Grandin's perspective through her writing and documentaries giving both general education and special education teachers insight into what strategies and approaches have worked best for her. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 481 Field Study# 1 (Reading) - 1 Hour

In this course, students will work in a school setting in public or private school to complete tasks in the field that are directly tied to FLDOE ESOL endorsement and Competencies and Skills. This course is designed to allow students to participate in low-level classroom tasks in the K-6 setting. The TIU Director of Elementary Education will work cooperatively with local schools to place students in schools/classrooms that allow for engagement of and experience with ESOL students. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 482 Field Study #2 (Reading) - 1 Hour

In this course, students will work in a public or private school setting to complete tasks in the field that are directly tied to FLDOE Reading endorsement and Competencies and Skills in reading. This course is designed to allow students to participate in low-level classroom tasks in the K-6 setting. The TIU Director of Elementary Education will work cooperatively with local schools to place students in schools/classrooms that allow the engagement of and experience with struggling readers and/or reading teachers with significant experience in reading instruction. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

ED 483 Student Teaching in the Elementary School - 10 Hours

Observation and teaching in an elementary school classroom under direct supervision of a qualified cooperating teacher and a college instructor. This capstone experience is designed to aid the student teacher to bring together theory and practice. This course requires twelve weeks of observing/teaching in a classroom and participating in a student teaching seminar. The first week will be a Reading Practicum. Weeks two through 12 are student teaching. During the semester of student teaching, the student must be available during regular school hours and not be employed full-time. This is an intense time of work, and student-teachers must give full attention to teaching. The student must have all core courses completed, and no other coursework may be taken during the student teaching experience. Elementary Education core. Prerequisite: IDS 105 (core requirement). Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

EM 5110 Educational Ministry - 2 Hours

This course assists ministry leaders in understanding and functioning as practitioners who lead God?s people toward maturity in Christ. Topics include: educational foundations and frameworks, teaching and learning, curriculum development, whole life discipleship, as well as generational and intergenerational ministries.

EM 5125 Teaching and Learning - 2 Hours

This course examines how Christian teachers can deepen their conceptual understanding and educational skills as they communicate gospel teaching in a variety of contexts. Topics addressed include maturing in Christ as a Christian teacher, developmental learning theories, teaching strategies, teaching the Bible, evaluation tools, teaching teachers, and the roles of both the teacher and the learner during the teaching and learning process. Available online.

EM 5510 Christian Formation & Journey - 1-2 Hours

This course focuses on the process of spiritual growth in the life of the believer, focusing on how the church has understood Christian spirituality and the process of Christ being formed in the believer. Special attention is given to the nature of the spiritual journey of the believer and the kind of educational interventions that are likely to enable spiritual growth in the people of God.

EM 5541 Youth and Emerging Adults in the Church - 1-2 Hours

This course explores the equipping of leaders of youth ages 11-18 and emerging adults ages 19-29. Biblical, educational, and philosophical foundations of holistic ministries in the church are explored. Research in youth culture, formative needs, competencies, adaptable skills, frameworks, and approaches needed for youth and emerging adult engagement will be addressed. Participants will gain core insights and develop personal practice for contextually ministering to youth and emerging adults enabling experiences of flourishing, connection, and belonging with and within the church. Available online.

EM 6000 Current Topics in Educational Ministries - 1-4 Hours

Select and specialized topics relevant to educational ministry.

EM 6110 Christian Leadership - 2 Hours

This course explores the theory and practice of Christian leadership through biblical, theological, and social science foundations. Topics include: developing the character and competency of leaders, strengthening contextual awareness in leading, fostering collaborative teams, leading change, managing conflict, and cultivating a life-giving systems approach to organizations.

EM 6260 Small Group Ministry in the Church - 1-2 Hours

This course examines the biblical and theological foundations of small group ministry, the role of groups in spiritual formation, strategies for building group ministry in a local church, developing group dynamics, and the role and training of group leaders in guiding an effective group meeting.

EM 6265 Building Ministry Teams - 1-2 Hours

This course focuses on the role, effectiveness, structure, leadership, and impact of highly functioning teams in the church. Emphasis will be placed on team design, decision making, mission, relationships, the role of the team in the larger organization, assessing team effectiveness and performance, and team leadership. Offered on a two-year rotation.

EM 6270 Building Community in the Church - 1-2 Hours

This course focuses on building a culture of community in the local church. Includes having a basic theology of community, and an examination of existing models for building the community life of a congregation, including small group models, missional communities, classes, geography-based strategies, and medium-sized gatherings. Offered on a two-year rotation.

EM 6275 Developing Healthy Spiritual Leaders - 1-2 Hours

This course discusses strategies and practices for developing healthy spiritual leaders, and will explore various leadership development strategies used by churches and other organizations. Offered on a two-year rotation. A retreat fee will be assessed.

EM 6500 Curriculum Development - 1-2 Hours

This course prepares students to develop individual lessons and coherent curriculum products. Students will explore the application of curriculum theory and the learning sciences to curriculum development. While the skills and frameworks will be broadly applicable, the course will focus on the development of curriculum to support the mission of the church. Available online.

EM 7110 Spiritual Formation in the Family - 1-2 Hours

Spiritual Formation in the Family explores how the family environment is a fertile place of faith formation for all ages. Topics include exploring contemporary family structures, a biblical vision for family faith formation, the strategic partnership between church and home, and various methods and approaches for family faith formation. A special emphasis will include connecting with families through digital media and methods. Available online.

EM 7465 MA in EM Capstone - 0-4 Hours

The MA in EM Capstone is developed in consultation with the EM faculty adviser and may be a portfolio, internship, or applied ministry experience. Contact your EM faculty adviser for further details.

EM 7466 MA in EM Capstone Extension - 0 Hours

A one-semester extension for EM 7465. Enrollment with consent of the faculty member of record. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. May not be repeated. No credit.

EM 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the Educational Ministries Department. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

ENG 105 English Composition - 3 Hours

Develops fundamentals of academic writing, including idea development and the effective organization of expression of ideas. Literature may be included; grammar and usage may be included as needed. Delivery mode: online, Wisconsin prison initiative.

ENG 106 Critical Thinking and Composition - 3 Hours

Intensive practice in academic writing, with emphasis on the writing process leading to writing effective arguments. A major paper including research and documentation of sources is required. Literature may be included. Prerequisite for online and Florida undergraduate: appropriate scoring on writing placement test or PCS 108. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate, online, and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

ENG 111 Critical Thinking and Writing - 3 Hours

Intensive practice in academic writing, with emphasis on the writing process leading to writing effective arguments. Students will enhance skills in idea development and in the effective organization and expression of ideas. A major paper including research and documentation of sources is required. Grammar and usage may be included as needed. Prerequisite for Deerfield traditional undergraduate: ACT English score of 19 or more or SAT verbal score of 450 or more or successful completion of ENG 106. Prerequisite for online and Florida undergraduate: appropriate scoring on writing placement test or ENG 106. Offered each semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate, online.

ENG 115 Writing & Research - 3 Hours

A second-level writing course that further develops writing and critical thinking skills. Coursework emphasizes tools and logic of information access, documentation style, and critical use of source material. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

ENG 210X Business Communication - 3 Hours

This course covers the fundamentals of both written and oral communication in the contemporary marketplace. It includes theory while emphasizing practical and varied applications simulating a broad range of professional and organizational situations. Particular attention is paid to persuasive writing, oral presentations, collaboration, and the appropriate use of technology. Prerequisite: ENG 106 or equivalent. Cross-listed with COM 210X. Delivery mode: online.

ENG 222 Studies in Fiction - 3 Hours

Basic methods of reading and analyzing fiction: study of forms, techniques and modern critical approaches. Includes fiction by traditional Western and global authors. Prerequisite: ENG 106 or equivalent. Offered each year for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: online, Florida undergraduate, and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

ENG 305 Argumentation and Persuasive Speaking - 3 Hours

This course is designed for students who wish to improve their ability to structure analytical arguments and communicate persuasively. Students will examine major theories of argumentation and persuasion as related to oral communication in cultural, political, organizational, and interpersonal settings. Special attention is given to audience analysis, message structure, and effective delivery of student's speeches, as well as practical analysis of rhetorical discourse in popular culture. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

ENG 308 Nineteenth-Century Women Authors - 3 Hours

This course is an introduction to nineteenth-century literature written by women. It explores the ways women writers construct gender and identity, portray women's roles in culture and society, and develop their own creative expression. Since women writers of the nineteenth century are a diverse group, the authors studied in this course represent a variety of class, regional, racial, ethnic, and religious identities. This course also analyzes how women writers shape, challenge, or support our own worldviews. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

ENG 355 Literature and Ideas - 3 Hours

Practical field experience, preferably off-campus, of at least 43 hours of supervised work including a strong writing component in an approved area of the communication field as established by the department. Does not satisfy the professional experience requirement for the English/Communication major. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

ENG 400 Writing Fiction - 3 Hours

Analysis and practice of fiction writing techniques that culminates in the development of a portfolio of short stories. Classes follow a workshop format. Does not satisfy College Writing requirement. Offered on demand. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

ES 7524 Children in the Church - 1-2 Hours

In this coursem participants investigate and develop a variety of options for contemporary educational and ministry experiences with children. Trends in the church's ministry to children will be considered. The variety of curricular and other resources, parachurch agencies, and networks that support children's ministry in the church will be explored.

ES 7535 Nurturing Families in the Church - 1-2 Hours

This course examines the nature of marital and family relationships in preparation for participants to understand these dynamics in their own families, in the families of those to whom they minister, and the impact of these on their ability to be effective ministers. The course concludes with a consideration of church as the family of God.

ES 7550 Local Church as System - 1-2 Hours

In this course, participants examine how local church bodies are interdependent systems of people and practices. Topics include local church life cycles, administrative practices that build gospel health, adaptive leadership, and cultivating gospel-centered teams and partnerships.

ES 7560 Program Planning Dynamics in the Church - 1-3 Hours

In this course, participants examine how gospel-centered leaders negotiate stakeholder interests toward advancement of God's Kingdom. Topics include identifying stakeholder interests, navigating power dynamics, and planning toward mission. Available online.

ES 7815 Change, Power, and Conflict - 1-2 Hours

This course explores the challenges of change, power, and conflict in relation to developing and transitioning Christian organizations (including but not limited to the local church). Participants will identify and clearly articulate common issues related to change, power, and conflict in organizations; create effective strategies and processes to address these issues; and foster personal attitudinal responses to change, power, and conflict that emanate from biblical wisdom.

ES 8000 Seminar: Current Issues in Educational Ministries - 1-4 Hours

Topics chosen deal with contemporary issues in Educational Ministries.

ES 8211 Teaching Others to Teach - 1-2 Hours

This course connects Bible teaching with equipping others to interpret and teach the Bible. Topics include utilizing Bible study tools and resources, employing sound interpretive principles, recognizing group dynamics, identifying Biblical genres, communicating Biblical themes, harnessing effective educational methods, and identifying creative teaching strategies.

ES 8240 Intergenerational Education in the Church - 1-2 Hours

In this course, participants examine current intergenerational theory and practice in light of Biblical texts and themes. Topics include generational developmental theories, personal mentoring and mentoring communities, and developing intergenerational teams.

ES 8258 Online Teaching and Learning - 1-2 Hours

This course assists participants to develop a philosophy and practice of online education for the educator. Topics include: planning online classes, designing online classes particularly for the adult learner, and implementing online classes with attention to the participant?s context. Discussion will include the ?flipped classroom?, the abundance of content availability, access, and a philosophy of online teaching.

ES 8710 Social Intelligence and Leadership - 1-2 Hours

In this course, participants examine social intelligence and its relationship to leading organizations, teams, and individual organizational members. Social intelligence includes social awareness and relationship building skills that allow leaders to foster empathy, collaboration, and teamwork with others in their organizations. Participants critically reflect on the theological, theoretical, practical, and contextual aspects of this subject.

ES 8715 Appreciative Inquiry - 1-2 Hours

This course explores cultivating life-giving organizations through Appreciative Inquiry (AI). AI has been described as "The cooperative search for the best in people, their organizations, and the world around them. It involves systematic discovery of what gives a system 'life' when the system is most effective and capable in economic, ecological, and human terms." It is more than a set of tools or methods, but "a way of thinking and being" that leads to innovation for the flourishing and wholeness of larger systems or networks. In this course, we think critically and reflect theologically about the philosophy, theory, practices, and processes of AI.

ES 9000 Current Issues in Educational Studies - 1-3 Hours

Topics are chosen to reflect research interests of faculty or program participants or that explore matters of concern to the field of educational studies. Offered on demand.

ES 9001 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

ES 9110 Orientation to EDS Doctoral Studies - 1 Hour

The Educational Studies doctoral program is designed to further the development of leaders already serving in organizations such as higher education institutions, mission agencies, congregations, parachurch agencies, and relief and development agencies. This orientation course gathers new students into an understanding of the learning culture of the community, its values, core competencies, and expected learning outcomes. Offered Fall and Spring. Credit/No Credit.

ES 9150 Teaching in Higher Education - 2 Hours

Through Biblically shaped critical reflection, participants will examine the core elements of transformative learning theory and practice. Topics include critical reflection and the mind of Christ; personal and social change dynamics; whole person domain teaching and learning; and cultivating gospel healthy learning climates.

ES 9175 Leadership and the Development of Organizations - 3 Hours

The course will survey and analyze contemporary issues in developing and leading healthy organizations. Participants will engage in theological reflection regarding potential contributions from the field of Organization Development (OD) in leadership of organizations. Topics include organizational design; innovation; diagnosing and facilitating healthy organizational change; team building; collaborative leadership; leadership development and succession strategies; and the development of vision, mission and values using large group intervention strategies.

ES 9200 Adult Learning Foundations - 3 Hours

Participants will critically examine selected adult education theories and perspectives in light of Scripture and consider their application to the Christian adult educator's philosophy of educational ministry and practice. Topics include adult development, experiential education, critical educational theory, global models of adult learning, and transformational learning.

ES 9210 Curriculum Theory and Design - 2 Hours

An examination of the guidelines for the development of a coherent curriculum. Discussion of application of curricular theory to religious instruction.

ES 9215 Art, Beauty, and Creativity - 1-2 Hours

The relationship of art, beauty, and creativity to learning from a Christian perspective is the nature of this course. Topics include biblical and theological foundations for art, beauty, and creativity; artfulness and culture making; cultivating the true, good, and beautiful in learning; and image bearing and the creative process in learning.

ES 9250 Modes of Higher Education - 2-3 Hours

An examination of the historic and contemporary higher education modes and/or issues with consideration for the present and future direction of higher education. Models such as Bible colleges, liberal arts colleges, theological institutions, universities, church-based education, online distance education, extensions, and non-traditional modes may be examined. Issues related to the present and future will be considered. Offered on a two to three-year rotation.

ES 9260 Fundraising Principles and Practices - 1-2 Hours

This course provides an overview of topics related to fundraising principles and practices in the context of Christian organizations and institutions. Topics include nurturing generous donors; cultivating an institutional culture of generosity; theology, money, and fundraising; and fundraising skill development.

ES 9275 Higher Education Administration - 2 Hours

The basic elements of academic administration: faculty resources, student affairs, finance and budget, board and presidential roles, library services, development and public relations. Particular application is made to Christian higher education institutions and to administrative relationships with parent organizations. Offered alternate years.

ES 9280 Assessment in Higher Education - 1-2 Hours

Faculty in higher education are mandated by external stakeholders to demonstrate effectiveness in the classroom and institutionally. Assessment objectives shape classroom curriculum, program outcomes, and institutional ethos. Administrators expect faculty to understand and practice assessment in their teaching and institutional work. Assessment in Higher Education will seek to explicate assessment in the classroom, through program outcomes, and institutional ethos.

ES 9305 Developing Emerging Leaders - 1-2 Hours

Utilizing a scholar-practitioner model, this course will survey and analyze contemporary theory, practices, and processes in developing emerging leaders. A seminar format will be employed, relying on participants' independent research and learning in preparation for class presentations and class discussions. Offered on a two to three-year rotation.

ES 9310 Mid-Career Leadership Development - 2 Hours

This course focuses on the theory, practices, and processes of developing mid-career leaders. Participants will be challenged to personally apply what they learn to their development as a leader. In addition, participants.

ES 9316 Innovation, Agility, and Leading Change - 2 Hours

Participants in this course will explore the theological, theoretical, practical, and contextual aspects of cultivating innovation, designing organizations for agility, and leading change in organizations. Topics include classic and current theories of change; diffusion of innovation; types of organizational change; barriers to change; large system intervention strategies; social intelligence and the management of change transitions; and practical strategies for change implementation. A seminar format will be employed, relying on participants' independent research and learning in preparation for class presentation and class discussions. Offered on a two to three-year rotation.

ES 9330 Developing Collaborative Teams - 1-2 Hours

Participants will explore the theological, theoretical, and practical elements of developing collaborative teams. Topics include teams vs. groups; team selection and formation; building team trust; conflict as creative tension; measuring team effectiveness; and effective team coaching. Offered on a two to three-year rotation.

ES 9500 Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Education - 3 Hours

Through Biblically shaped critical reflection, participants will investigate the psychological and sociological underpinnings of educational theory and practice. Topics include major psychological and sociological theories; primary issues of educational psychology and sociology; and implications for contextualized teaching, learning, and educational practice.

ES 9510 Developmental Issues of Children, Youth, or Adults - 1-2 Hours

Participants will explore current developmental theories and issues related to children, youth, or adults rooted in redemptive image bearing. Topics include family of origin dynamics, learning disabilities, ministry to the whole person, and life transitions.

ES 9620 Education and Culture - 2 Hours

Examines the cultural values shaping Western and two-thirds world education systems. Greek versus traditional cultural value systems, learning styles, forms of logic, language structures, and other major cultural variances are considered with respect to educational function and purpose.

ES 9700 Biblical and Theological Formation of the Educator - 3 Hours

Because God's redemptive sovereignty is creation-wide, all aspects of life have eternal significance. Participants will address the implications of this revealed truth for life and educational ministry by examining Biblical, theological, historical, and contemporary resources. Topics include image bearing agency, vocational stewardship, worldview formation, and theologically shaped education.

ES 9725 Ethics in Education - 3 Hours

An examination of foundational principles in ethical thought, focusing on the source of ethical principles and the need for ethical absolutes. Discussion then focuses on ethical questions in education with emphasis on educational practices and ethics on institutional policies and culture. Offered alternate years.

ES 9750 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education - 3 Hours

Through Biblically shaped critical reflection, participants will investigate the historical and philosophical underpinnings of educational theory and practice. Participants will explore historic and contemporary philosophical streams from major western and non-western resources. Topics include key philosophers and educational theorists; primary issues of educational philosophy; and implications for contextualized teaching, learning, and educational practice.

ES 9890 Professional Development Practicum - 0-2 Hours

Participants design, conduct, and evaluate at least one professional development activity for 0-2 credits. These integrative and generative activities could take the form of teaching, consulting, guest lecturing, conference presenting, developing curriculum, coaching, grant or article writing, etc. All activities must be conducted after EDS PhD program matriculation. Participants normally will have completed 15 credit hours prior to registering for a PDP. One credit hour is equivalent to approximately 35-40 hours of invested practicum work. Potential PDP deliverables include course syllabi, strategic plans, outlines, slides, grant proposals, supervisor/advisor debriefs, reflection logs, articles, presentations, etc. Each EDS student is responsible to initiate conversations toward PDP planning with an appropriate EDS faculty member. Participants may propose non-Trinity or Trinity-related activities and opportunities. Credit/No Credit.

ES 9910 Foundations in Social Science Literature - 3 Hours

Participants will learn to conduct systematic literature reviews of the social science research literature that serve as a theoretical framework for research design. Linkages will be made primarily from sociology, anthropology, psychology, business management, and education to the participants' present research interests. Offered every year.

ES 9915 Social Science Research Design - 3 Hours

The twofold purpose of this course is to engage in theological reflection on the complementary aspects of general and special revelation, and to provide an overview of research design. More specifically, the overview consists of understanding the preliminary considerations that go into selecting a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research design. These include knowing the definition for these different approaches, considering philosophical worldviews, reviewing the literature, understanding the use of theory, anticipating ethical issues, and developing writing strategies. We will discuss the process of research as it relates to each approach. This process includes writing an introduction, specifying a purpose statement, and developing research questions and/or hypotheses. This course will also discuss the methods and procedures for quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods studies. Offered every year.

ES 9920 Qualitative Research Methods - 3 Hours

Prepares the participant to design and conduct fieldwork research in both Christian education and mission communities. Observation techniques and in-depth interviewing are the primary inquiry skills learned in order to discover the individual's perspective. Particular attention is given to the processes of gathering, recording, coding, and analyzing data in order to report rich descriptive findings and conclusions supported by the data. How qualitative research methodology is used to generate "grounded theory" is also examined.

ES 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/EDS program participants may repeat the course twice for a total of three hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ES 9990 Dissertation Proposal Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. PhD/EDS program participants may repeat this course twice for a total of 3 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ES 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Courses taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ES 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.

GEO 100 World Geography - 3 Hours

An introduction to the discipline of human geography covering major regions of the world since 1945. Delivery mode: online.

GR 201 Elementary Greek I - 4 Hours

Introduction to phonology, morphology, and grammar of New Testament Greek, with readings in the Johannine literature or the Thessalonian correspondence and vocabulary development. Both GR 201 and GR 202 are required in order to apply to major. Delivery mode: online.

GR 202 Elementary Greek II - 4 Hours

Further study in phonology, morphology, and grammar of New Testament Greek, with readings in the Johannine literature or the Thessalonian correspondence and vocabulary development. Both GR 201 and GR 202 are required in order to apply to major. Prerequisite: GR 201. Delivery mode: online.

HI 101 History of Western Culture I - 4 Hours

The first in a series of three courses that integrate the philosophy, history, fine arts, and literature of Western civilization using a basic timeline as the organizing principle. This course will focus on antiquity through the Roman period. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

HI 102 History of Western Culture II - 4 Hours

The second in a series of three courses that integrate the philosophy, history, fine arts, and literature of Western civilization using a basic timeline as the organizing principle. This course will deal with the medieval period, Renaissance, Reformation, and the beginning of the Enlightenment. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

HI 103 History of Western Culture III - 4 Hours

The third in a series of three courses that integrate the philosophy, history, fine arts, and literature of Western civilization using a basic timeline as the organizing principle. This course will deal with the new republics, colonial period, Industrial Revolution, and the 20th century. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

HI 121 United States History Through the Civil War - 3 Hours

A study of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the United States from the discovery of America through the Civil War. For Education and Secondary Education majors, an overview of Illinois State History is included. Prerequisites: none. Offered fall semester of odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate and Florida undergraduate.

HI 122 United States History Since the Civil War - 3 Hours

A study of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the United States since the Civil War. For Education and Secondary Education majors, an overview of Illinois State History is included. Prerequisites: none. Offered spring semester of even-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate and Florida undergraduate.

HI 201 World Civilizations to 1600 - 3 Hours

A study of Western and non-Western cultures from antiquity through the Protestant Reformation. Emphasis on the development of the classical and medieval West and an introduction to major world cultures and religions. Prerequisites: none. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

HI 202 World Civilizations Since 1600 - 3 Hours

A study of Western and non-Western cultures from 1600 through the present. Emphasis on the rise and decline of the modern West, its imperialism, and the emergence of modernized Western nations in the twentieth century. Prerequisite: none. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: online.

HI 321X American Church History - 3 Hours

A survey of the history of Christianity in America from the colonial period to the present. Special attention is paid to the Protestant evangelical tradition. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Cross-listed with BRS 321X.

HI 323 The History of African American Religious Experience - 3 Hours

A study of the forging of two religious cultures - one African, one European - into a uniquely African American religious culture. The reciprocal nature of the relationship between the social, political, and economic environment of the United States and the institution of "Slave Religion" will be explored to determine the impact of each on the other. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

HI 340X History of Christianity - 3 Hours

A survey of the history of the Christian church from the New Testament to the present. Approximately equal time is spent on the early, medieval, Reformation, and modern periods. Cross-listed with BRS 340X. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

HI 375 Topics in American History - 3 Hours

An examination of selected topics in the social, economic, political, and cultural development of the United States from the colonial era to the present. May be repeated for credit if topic concentration differs. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

HM 6200 Theology and Methodology of Biblical Preaching - 2 Hours

This course lays the biblical and theological foundations for preaching and develops preaching skills with an emphasis on faithfulness, contextualization, clarity, and spiritual power. Successful students are able to defend a biblical theology of preaching and craft biblically faithful sermons and have learned strategies to overcome common pitfalls in preaching. Students expound two preaching portions, one from a New Testament epistle and one from an Old Testament text. Students receive constructive feedback from a professor and peers. Must register for HM 6201 in same semester. Offered Quad A.

HM 6201 Preaching Lab - 0-2 Hours

Lab sessions-must be taken concurrently with HM 6200. Offered Quad B.

HM 7215 Preaching with Genre Sensitivity - 2 Hours

This course considers preaching biblical texts with genre-sensitivity. Students learn the hermeneutical and homiletical demands of narrative, poetic, and prophetic genres and are given the opportunity to prepare and deliver sermons from narrative, poetic, or prophetic texts. Prerequisite: HM 6200.

HM 7220 Preaching and Pastoral Issues - 2 Hours

This course exposes students to preaching settings that demand unique pastoral wisdom and affect sermonic preparation and delivery. Students learn the unique nuances of preaching in scenarios such as, but not limited to, funerals and weddings, evangelistic gatherings, and crises that shake one?s community. Students have the opportunity to prepare and deliver sermons in these circumstances. Prerequisite: HM 6200.

HM 7316 Preaching and Systematic Theology - 2 Hours

This course provides a teaching practice and laboratory to give students tools, models, and opportunities integrating the disciplines of Systematic Theology and preaching.

HM 7410 Learning from Minoritized Preaching Traditions - 2 Hours

This course examines non-majority culture preaching traditions in the U.S. context. Students engage with preaching theories and sermons from these traditions in order to learn from and reflect on their own traditions and contexts. As a result, students consider how they can read and preach biblical texts in faithful and contextually meaningful ways. Students are given the opportunity to prepare sermons for a particular ministry context. Special attention is given to African American, Asian American, and Latin homiletical traditions. Prerequisite: HM 6200.

HM 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit/No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

HM 8000 Seminar: Current Issues - 1-3 Hours

Seminar discussion and advanced individual research on topics dealing with significant issues in homiletics and sermon delivery. Pre- or corequisite HM 6200.

HPW 180 Introduction to Health and Wellness - 3 Hours

The study of the quality of life involving dynamic interaction and interdependence among the individual's wellbeing, mental and emotional reactions, and the social complex in which the individual exists. Coursework includes theory of health, mental and emotional health, prevention and control of disease, nutrition, substance use and abuse, accident prevention and safety, community health, environmental health, and family life education. Includes laboratory and personal application experiences. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate, online.

HR 5110 Introduction to Human Rights - 3 Hours

This is an introductory course surveying the concepts, terminology, and history of human rights. The theological and historical origins of the international legal instruments and institutions involved in international human rights will be explored.

HS 202 Nutrition - 3 Hours

Effects of nutrition on performance and health emphasizing various methods of nutritional analysis, effects of current dietary practices, basic behavior modification techniques, nutritional needs of competitive and special populations, ergogenic aids, and referral resources. Offered each semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

ID 4010 Introduction to German - 2 Hours

An introduction to German vocabulary, grammar, and the reading of German texts. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Offered summer.

ID 4011 Theological German I - 2 Hours

An introduction to German theological vocabulary, review of grammar, and readings from selected theological literature in German. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Prerequisite: ID 4010, at least one year of college/university German, or consent of instructor. Offered summer.

ID 4012 Theological German II - 2 Hours

Further study of German theological vocabulary, grammar, and readings from selected theological literature in German. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Prerequisite: ID 4011. Offered summer.

ID 4021 Theological French I - 3 Hours

An introduction to French vocabulary, grammar, and the reading of French theological texts. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. No prerequisite. Offered fall.

ID 4022 Theological French II - 3 Hours

Further study of French theological vocabulary, grammar, and readings from selected theological literature in French. Not for graduate credit. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Prerequisite: ID 4021. Offered spring.

ID 5000 Biblical Theology and Interpretation - 2 Hours

A survey of biblical theology, including methodological issues of debate during the last two centuries. Emphasis on the Bible's storyline, examining how the books and corpora of the Bible contribute to the unfolding history of redemption. Attention is given to themes of temple, sacrifice, priest, rest, kingship, exile, idolatry, promise, messiah, wisdom, and others. Finally, the relationship of biblical theology with other disciplines, especially exegesis and systematic theology, is considered. Required for all MA in MHC, and MDiv students. Should be taken during first year of enrollment.

ID 5001 Foundations for Integrative Thought - 3 Hours

This course surveys the Bible from the standpoint of its unfolding history of creation, fall, redemption, and consummation, with special attention to Scriptural applications and ramifications for ethical behavior. The course considers how precedents, themes, truths, and strategies that established God's will in earlier times provide direction for God's people today. Students will practice interpreting scripture responsibly and thinking creatively about current issues in the light of biblical principles.

ID 5002 Foundations for Cultural Engagement - 3 Hours

This course introduces the student to pivotal Christian doctrines as a framework within which to evaluate the working assumptions of contemporary culture. In addition to investigating several models for Christian engagement with culture, the course encourages the positive formation of a Christian worldview as a foundation for wise interaction with contemporary thought.

ID 5061 Latin I - 2 Hours

Latin I is the first of two sequential courses in the study of the fundamentals of Latin morphology, grammar, and syntax, as well as basic vocabulary. Skills in reading, understanding, and translating adapted and unadapted passages will be developed, with special emphasis on the Latin Church fathers and other Christian texts. No audits. Offered on demand.

ID 5062 Latin II - 2 Hours

Latin II is the second of two sequential courses in the study of the fundamentals of Latin morphology, grammar, and syntax, as well as basic vocabulary. Skills in reading, understanding, and translating adapted and unadapted passages will be developed, with special emphasis on the Latin Church fathers and other Christian texts. Prerequisite ID 5061. No audits. Offered on demand.

ID 5080 Formation Group - 0 Hours

Formation Group is an intentional weekly experience under the leadership of a faculty member. Formation Groups seek to grow together in biblical wisdom, in the grace of God, and in relationships and relational skills. MDiv students must register for two semesters prior to candidacy, generally the first two semesters of enrollment; MA students may register for two semesters in lieu of one PT 5090 Field Education requirement. Additional semesters by MDiv or non-MDiv students with or without registration are encouraged. Regular attendance necessary for credit, only two absences permitted. Credit / No Credit. Offered fall and spring.

ID 6000 Current Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies - 1-3 Hours

Selected topics of general or interdisciplinary interest.

ID 6500 Understanding the Social and Cultural Contexts of Ministry - 2 Hours

Employing theories and methods from anthropology and sociology, this course aims to equip the student to exegete and critically analyze the socio-cultural context of today's changing world from a biblical and theologically informed perspective. The course will then seek to help the student to understand the dialectic relationship between the church and its surrounding cultures/societies and the church's call to be an effective and prophetic witness in the contemporary world. Students will acquire context-oriented understandings and skills that will inform their ministry strategies and practices.

ID 6910 Research Methods - 1 Hour

The techniques for conducting competent graduate-level bibliographic research, as well as attention to the planning, preparation, and writing of theses, will be covered in this course, which is required of all students completing the MA degree with the thesis option. Course will not count toward the 30-hour program requirement. (CR/NC only; not available for Audit).

ID 7375 Clinical Pastoral Education - 1-2 Hours

The Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) (www.acpe.edu) provides education related to pastoral care through the clinical educational methods of Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE). The CPE experience, with subsequent submission of a summary report, is available for Trinity elective credit. May be repeated. Credit/No Credit.

ID 7467 MA Theological Studies Capstone Proposal - 0 Hours

The Capstone Proposal class will guide MATS students through the process of writing a proposal for either an integrative paper or project. At the conclusion of this course, students will have an initial proposal which they can build upon with their faculty reader. Offered for credit/no-credit.

ID 7468 MA (Theological Studies) Capstone - 2 Hours

A program capstone for MA (Theological Studies) students designed to integrate the general theological education received by the program participant. The capstone may be an integrative paper or a project as defined in the Academic Handbook and will reflect approximately eighty-four clock hours of work. Counts as half-time academic status. Letter grade only.

ID 7469 MA (Theological Studies) Capstone Extension - 0 Hours

A one-semester extension for ID 7468. Enrollment with consent of the faculty member of record. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. May not be repeated. No Credit.

ID 7478 MA Capstone Project - 0-3 Hours

A department-specific summative program project (MA/E, MA/CM) as arranged with the department of concentration. Not available in all programs.

ID 7480 MA Capstone Integrative Paper - 0-2 Hours

Participants in MA programs requiring a capstone integrative paper register for this course (MA/ICS). Specific paper requirements should be obtained from the department. Counts as half-time academic status. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as required by the program.

ID 7481 MA Capstone Integrative Paper Extension - 0 Hours

A one-semester extension for ID 7480. Enrollment with consent of the faculty member of record. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as quarter-time academic status. May not be repeated. No Credit.

ID 7501 Guided Research - 1-6 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

ID 7750 Study Tour - 1-4 Hours

Study tour sponsored by the university involving travel to a site of biblical or historic Christian interest, or a ministry-based study tour. May be substituted for a required OT or NT course by petition.

ID 7900 Theological Research Methods - 2 Hours

The techniques for gaining bibliographical control over the literature of theological subjects, as well as attention to the planning, preparation, and writing of theses are covered in this class. Credit / No Credit. Offered fall and spring.

ID 8100 Scholarship and the Christian Mind - 2 Hours

This course introduces students to central themes and issues related to academic ministry in secular and Christian universities and seminaries. Students will explore and engage in topics including: vocational stewardship in the academy; Christian worldview and intellectual life; the history and philosophical foundations of the modern university; Christian faithfulness and fruitfulness in academic teaching and research. Each of these topics will be considered in light of students' personal gifts and vocational direction with the aim of exploring how their evangelical Christian faith might inform their teaching and scholarship.

ID 9200 Integrative THS Seminar I - 4 Hours

This seminar course is intended to promote significant cross-disciplinary study, reflection, and interaction on a (set of) biblical text(s) (OT and/or NT) with special focus on the theological issues raised in the text(s). Two THS faculty will lead the course, one in biblical studies (OT/NT) and one in theological studies (ST/HT). The course will consist primarily of papers and responses presented by the students along with open ended class discussion.

ID 9300 Integrative THS Seminar II - 4 Hours

This seminar course is intended to promote significant cross-disciplinary study, reflection, and interaction on the dissertation projects of the students in the course, with special focus on the theological issues raised in the dissertation. Two THS faculty will lead the course, one in biblical studies (OT/NT) and one in theological studies (ST/HT). The course will consist primarily of papers and responses presented by the students along with open ended class discussion.

IDS 105 Foundations for Adult Learning - 3 Hours

A focus on the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values required to maximize the benefit of education for adults. Concepts include the basic principles of adult development, learning approaches, personality, and work/life management. The ideas of Christian liberal arts education, learning in community, and lifelong learning as spiritual journey are explored. Various assessments and self-exploration tools are used to aid goal-setting, writing placement, and advising. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

IDS 106 Trinity Service Learning - 0-1 Hours

Trinity Service Learning seeks to develop students' ethic of service, sense of social responsibility, and commitment to civic engagement. Through service, students will grow in their capacity to love and serve individuals and communities, within and outside Trinity, both locally and globally. Students will use their skills and abilities to make a difference in real-world settings, and will put their faith into action. Opportunities may include service in on-campus activities and programs, a local church, community programs, mission trips, and summer camp leadership. Some paid or stipend positions may count if the position involves direct service to others in a leadership capacity. Students must register for IDS 106 in the semester of their project, complete a planning form, submit a reflection by the due date, and be evaluated by their supervisor. Zero-credit option is offered only on a pass-no-credit basis, repeatable for obtaining a Service Learning completion. Requires a minimum of 12 hours of service. Offered every semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate. One-credit option is offered only on a pass-no-credit basis, repeatable for obtaining a Service Learning completion. Requires a minimum of 45 hours of service. Offered every semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

IDS 150 Foundations of Christian Thinking and Living - 3 Hours

This course equips Trinity College students to live as active and thoughtful believers on campus and in society at large. It orients students to the unique features of Christian liberal arts education at Trinity College, examines the core doctrinal elements of the Christian faith, and investigates what it means to live Christianly in the world today. Required of all Trinity College students. This course must be taken at Trinity. Offered each semester for TIU-Florida; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: TIU-Florida and online.

IDS 180 One Mission, Many Stories - 3 Hours

This course orients students to distinctive features of Christian liberal arts education at Trinity College, examines the core doctrinal elements of the Christian faith as expressed in the TIU/Evangelical Free Church of America statement of faith, explores the evangelical mission of the Church and investigates what it means to live Christianly in the world today. Required of all Trinity College students. This course must be taken at Trinity. Delivery mode: online.

IDS 290 Critical Topics in the 21st Century - 3 Hours

Students will explore one or more issues that have significant bearing on the world today, identifying contributing factors, applying biblical principles, discussing implications, and reaching informed conclusions. Class topics may include but are not limited to poverty, climate change, social justice, technology, healthcare, education, the arts and immigration. Delivery mode: online, Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

IDS 365 Acadeum Online Consortium - 1-4 Hours

The AcadeumÿCourse Sharing program offersÿthe opportunity for students to take online courses from other CCCU institutions within the Acadeumÿpartner network, making a wider range of courses available to students. Approval of the academic dean is required.ÿMay be repeated for credit if content differs. Additional information is available in the Academic Dean's office. Delivery mode: online.

LA 505a Legal Institutions and Values - 3 Hours

This course surveys foundational sources in history, philosophy, Christian theology, and the Bible as the basis for legal and governmental order in the United States. Topics range from Sumerian democracy to Greek and Roman law to the sources and impact of the English common law. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 505x Legal Institutions and Values - 3 Hours

This course surveys foundational sources in history, philosophy, Christian theology, and the Bible as the basis for legal and governmental order in the United States. Topics range from Sumerian democracy to Greek and Roman law to the sources and impact of the English common law. Delivery Mode: JD Flex Track.

LA 521 Contracts 1 - 3 Hours

This course studies the fundamentals of contract law, including the common law and selected portions of the Restatement (Second) of Contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code. Contracts 1 covers remedies, offer, acceptance, discerning the agreement, parol evidence rule, Statute of Frauds, multi-party transactions, and enforceability. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 521x Contracts 1 - 3 Hours

This course studies the fundamentals of contract law, including the common law and selected portions of the Restatement (Second) of Contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code. Contracts 1 covers remedies, offer, acceptance, discerning the agreement, parol evidence rule, Statute of Frauds, multi-party transactions, and enforceability. Delivery Mode: JD Flex Track.

LA 522a Contracts 2 - 3 Hours

This course studies the fundamentals of contract law, including the common law and selected portions of the Restatement (Second) of Contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code. Contracts 2 covers consideration, promissory estoppel, warranties and conditions, breach, and defenses. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 522x Contracts 2 - 3 Hours

This course studies the fundamentals of contract law, including the common law and selected portions of the Restatement (Second) of Contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code. Contracts 2 covers consideration, promissory estoppel, warranties and conditions, breach, and defenses. Delivery mode: JD Flex Track.

LA 523 Contracts Drafting - 1 Hour

This course teaches students practical contract drafting skills, including how to translate a business deal into contract concepts, how to draft each of a contract's parts, how to draft with clarity and without ambiguity, how to negotiate a contract, and how to review and analyze a contract. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 523a Contracts Drafting - 2 Hours

This course teaches students practical contract drafting skills, including how to translate a business deal into contract concepts, how to draft each of a contract's parts, how to draft with clarity and without ambiguity, how to negotiate a contract, and how to review and analyze a contract. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 531a Criminal Law - 3 Hours

This course teaches students how to deal with substantive criminal law problems in both practical and policy terms. The course inquires into the proper scope and objectives of criminal law, limitations on the State's power to define criminal liability, and general principles of liability and defenses for offenses against the person and property. The course also provides an opportunity for critical examination of statutes at an early stage in the law student's career. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 531x Criminal Law - 3 Hours

This course teaches students how to deal with substantive criminal law problems in both practical and policy terms. The course inquires into the proper scope and objectives of criminal law, limitations on the State's power to define criminal liability, and general principles of liability and defenses for offenses against the person and property. The course also provides an opportunity for critical examination of statutes at an early stage in the law student's career. Delivery mode: JD Flex Track.

LA 541 Torts 1 - 3 Hours

This course covers the civil laws governing compensation for injury to person and property. Torts 1 focuses on intentional torts and defenses, negligence and defenses, wrongful death, survival, statute of limitations, immunities, and vicarious liability. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 541x Torts 1 - 3 Hours

This course covers the civil laws governing compensation for injury to person and property. Torts 1 focuses on intentional torts and defenses, negligence and defenses, wrongful death, survival, statute of limitations, immunities, and vicarious liability. Delivery Mode: JD Flex Track.

LA 542 Torts 2 - 3 Hours

This course covers the civil laws governing compensation for injury to person and property. Torts 2 studies strict liability, products liability, nuisance, defamation, invasion of privacy, civil rights, misuse of legal procedure, intentional and negligent misrepresentation, business torts and familial relationships, torts in the age of statutes, and compensation systems as substitutes for tort law. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 542x Torts 2 - 3 Hours

This course covers the civil laws governing compensation for injury to person and property. Torts 2 studies strict liability, products liability, nuisance, defamation, invasion of privacy, civil rights, misuse of legal procedure, intentional and negligent misrepresentation, business torts and familial relationships, torts in the age of statutes, and compensation systems as substitutes for tort law. Delivery Mode: JD Flex Track.

LA 543 Open Development in Cambodia: Human Trafficking and Economic Development - 2-4 Hours

This is an advanced course in human trafficking and economic development. Students will analyze and discuss current issues in human trafficking, focusing on sex trafficking in Southeast Asia. Students will learn the history of human trafficking, and how human trafficking is combatted in the modern world. Students will also learn about economic development in Southeast Asia, and how it is a modern way of combating human trafficking. Trinity Law School teaches this course from a Christian perspective and actively incorporates Biblical principles into the curriculum. Thus, this class/trip has three major aspects or themes to it: (1) basic concepts and laws relevant to human rights; (2) human trafficking; and (3) the role and relationship of worldviews and economic factors and development or lack thereof to human rights and human trafficking. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 543b Human Trafficking and Economic Development (Asia) - 2 Hours

This is an advanced course in human trafficking and economic development. Students analyze and discuss current issues in human trafficking, focusing on sex trafficking in Southeast Asia. Students learn the history of human trafficking, and how human trafficking is combatted in the modern world. Students also learn about economic development in Southeast Asia, and how it is a modern way of combating human trafficking. Trinity Law School teaches this course from a Christian perspective and actively incorporates biblical principles into the curriculum. Thus, this course has three major aspects or themes to it: (1) basic concepts and laws relevant to human rights; (2) human trafficking; and (3) the role and relationship of worldviews, and economic factors and development to human rights and human trafficking. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 543c Human Trafficking and Economic Development (Asia) - 3 Hours

This is an advanced course in human trafficking and economic development. Students analyze and discuss current issues in human trafficking, focusing on sex trafficking in Southeast Asia. Students learn the history of human trafficking, and how human trafficking is combatted in the modern world. Students also learn about economic development in Southeast Asia, and how it is a modern way of combating human trafficking. Trinity Law School teaches this course from a Christian perspective and actively incorporates biblical principles into the curriculum. Thus, this course has three major aspects or themes to it: (1) basic concepts and laws relevant to human rights; (2) human trafficking; and (3) the role and relationship of worldviews, and economic factors and development to human rights and human trafficking. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 543d Human Trafficking and Economic Development (Asia) - 4 Hours

This is an advanced course in human trafficking and economic development. Students analyze and discuss current issues in human trafficking, focusing on sex trafficking in Southeast Asia. Students learn the history of human trafficking, and how human trafficking is combatted in the modern world. Students also learn about economic development in Southeast Asia, and how it is a modern way of combating human trafficking. Trinity Law School teaches this course from a Christian perspective and actively incorporates biblical principles into the curriculum. Thus, this course has three major aspects or themes to it: (1) basic concepts and laws relevant to human rights; (2) human trafficking; and (3) the role and relationship of worldviews, and economic factors and development to human rights and human trafficking. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 559 Legal Research and Writing 1: Objective Writing - 3 Hours

This course introduces students to fundamental legal reasoning, research (both online and book/hard copy), and writing skills in the context of objective legal documents. Students learn to identify, use, and analyze primary and secondary legal authorities to solve legal problems, and how to structure and draft legal memoranda. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 560b Legal Research and Writing 2: Persuasive Writing - 3 Hours

This course helps students develop their analytical, writing, and research skills in the advocacy context. Students produce litigation documents including a pre-trial motion and an appellate brief. Students are also required to participate in an oral argument competition to practice oral advocacy skills. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 560d Legal Writing: Litigation Skills - 3 Hours

This course is designed to provide legal writing experience to students interested in civil litigation, such as the drafting of demand letters, complaints, answers and other responsive pleadings, discovery, discovery responses, law and motion and pre-trial documents. It focuses upon areas of legal writing commonly associated with and required in civil litigation. It is designed to simulate attorney case handling in a civil litigation setting. Students will be provided with a class hypothetical based upon a real civil case and will be taught how to handle the case as a practicing attorney. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 560e Legal Writing: Transactional Skills - 3 Hours

This course is designed to provide legal writing experience to students interested in transactional civil practice. It focuses upon areas of legal writing commonly associated with and required in transactional civil practice, such as, opinion letters, letters to opposing counsel, commonly utilized contractual provisions, mutual settlements and releases, clauses related to indemnification and hold harmless agreements, anti-competition provisions, and confidentiality agreements. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 561 Mastering the MBE 1 - 1 Hour

This course focuses on Contracts, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, and Torts for the Multistate Bar Examination portion of the California Bar Exam. Students review the substantive law, practice extensively, develop time management strategies, and identify areas for improvement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 562 Mastering the MBE 2 - 1 Hour

This course focuses on Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Evidence, and Property for the Multistate Bar Examination portion of the California Bar Exam. Students review the substantive law, practice extensively, develop time management strategies, and identify areas for improvement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 567 Mastering the Performance Test - 1 Hour

This course focuses on the California Bar Exam Performance Test. In this course, we will develop time management strategies and approaches for how to organize and outline the test. Additionally, this course will provide the opportunity to complete several Performance Tests and receive personalized feedback. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 599x FYLSX Skills - 3 Hours

This course consists of a substantive law review of each subject tested on the California First-Year Law Students? Examination (FYLSX). In addition to the review of the substantive law, students receive extensive practice at both essay exam writing and multiple choice questions. This practice provides integration of the law and exam skills and is the means by which students earn their grades in this course. Approaches, checklists, and writing techniques are the focus throughout the course to enhance issue spotting, analysis, and application skills, which are necessary skills to pass the FYLSX. Delivery mode: JD Flex Track.

LA 600i Constitutional Law 1 - 3 Hours

This course covers the structure and powers of the federal government and selected topics regarding the relationship of the branches of the federal government to each other and to the states, as well as an introduction to due process and equal protection. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 601i Constitutional Law 2 - 3 Hours

This course covers selected topics regarding the Bill of Rights, due process, equal protection, and the effect of the Fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the States. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 613 Professional Responsibility and Ethics - 3 Hours

This course covers the laws governing lawyers' professional conduct. These laws are studied through ethics codes, text, cases, professional responsibility opinions, ethics problems, and class discussion. Principal attention is given to the lawyer's role in an adversary system; zealous representation; lawyer-client confidentiality; conflicts of interest; competency in providing legal services; ethics for prosecutors, judges, and litigation; solicitation of clients; lawyer advertising; and pro bono obligations. Students focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct, and the California Rules of Professional Conduct. This course also explores when lawyers must subordinate their own moral judgment to that of their clients or whistle-blow and violate what would otherwise be protected client confidences. Additionally, the ethics aspect of the course examines the broader moral and ethical issues and responsibilities of lawyers, judges, and clients, including Christian ethical perspectives. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 613x Professional Responsibility and Ethics - 3 Hours

This course covers the laws governing lawyers' professional conduct. These laws are studied through ethics codes, text, cases, professional responsibility opinions, ethics problems, and class discussion. Principal attention is given to the lawyer's role in an adversary system; zealous representation; lawyer-client confidentiality; conflicts of interest; competency in providing legal services; ethics for prosecutors, judges, and litigation; solicitation of clients; lawyer advertising; and pro bono obligations. Students focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct, ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct, and the California Rules of Professional Conduct. This course also explores when lawyers must subordinate their own moral judgment to that of their clients or whistle-blow and violate what would otherwise be protected client confidences. Additionally, the ethics aspect of the course examines the broader moral and ethical issues and responsibilities of lawyers, judges, and clients, including Christian ethical perspectives. Delivery Mode: JD Flex Track.

LA 661 Property 1 - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the acquisition, disposition, and use of personal and real property. Property 1 focuses on the nature of ownership and possession, bailment, donative transfers, adverse possession, common law classifications of estates in land, concurrent ownership, present and future interests in land, and landlord-tenant law. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 662 Property 2 - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the acquisition, disposition, and use of personal and real property. Property 2 focuses on transfers of interests in real property, real estate contracts, legal descriptions, conveyances and deeds, recording systems, title insurance, private land-use restrictions (easements, covenants, and equitable servitudes), public land-use regulations, mortgages, eminent domain, and regulatory takings. The course may include exposure to intellectual property. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 671i Evidence 1 - 3 Hours

This course covers the standards regulating admissibility of evidence in both civil and criminal trials. Evidence 1 covers common law and statutory principles and policy considerations underlying rules of evidence, admission and exclusion, relevancy and materiality, opinion evidence, authentication, the best evidence rule, judicial notice, public policy exclusions, and presumptions and burden of proof. Trial situations are simulated, students argue for and against the admission of evidence under the rules, and the course explores how evidence has an impact on tactical trial decisions. The course addresses the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Evidence Code, including any distinctions between the two. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 672i Evidence 2 - 3 Hours

This course covers the standards regulating admissibility of evidence in both civil and criminal trials. Evidence 2 covers privileged communications, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, and impeachment and rehabilitation. Trial situations are simulated, students argue for and against the admission of evidence under the rules, and the course explores how evidence has an impact on tactical trial decisions. The course addresses the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Evidence Code, including any distinctions between the two. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 673b Civil Procedure 1 - 3 Hours

This course covers aspects of civil litigation, including an introduction to the court system, personal and subject matter jurisdiction, venue, and the role of state law in federal courts. The course also discusses remedies and pleading. The course emphasizes federal civil procedure, but also addresses California procedure where it differs from the federal rules. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 674b Civil Procedure 2 - 3 Hours

This course covers aspects of civil litigation, discovery, parties, counterclaims, cross-claims, impleader, intervention, and interpleader. The course emphasizes federal civil procedure, but also addresses California procedure where it differs from the federal rules. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 674d E-Discovery - 1 Hour

This course introduces students to this increasingly competitive world and provides a basic understanding of the legal and technological issues surrounding the use of electronically stored information (ESI), and the practical parameters of eDiscovery and electronic case management. Students will learn what electronic discovery is, and how the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, the Federal Rules of Evidence, and case law affect this aspect of litigation. This course will discuss what an attorney and his team need to consider when handling ESI prior to and during the litigation process, how to manage the cost of production and processing, and how those considerations should affect an attorney's thought process when working with this type of information. Students will also learn how preservation obligations and spoliation claims can come into play. Lastly, the course explores the developing issues and new rules and practices involving the application of e-discovery, digital evidence and computer forensics issues in litigation and general practice. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 675a Alternative Dispute Resolution - 3 Hours

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop a thorough understanding of the different forms of ADR through the study of various ADR vehicles such as arbitration and mediation. In addition to developing an academic understanding of the appropriate use of ADR and the procedural posture upon which cases move into and through ADR, students are also given an opportunity to engage in mock ADR hearings both as counsel for the litigants in a hypothetical case, and as the neutral conducting the hearing. Finally, students are given the opportunity to prepare certain documents typically associated with ADR hearings such as Arbitration Briefs, Mediation Briefs, etc. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 675i Alternative Dispute Resolution - 2 Hours

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop a thorough understanding of the different forms of ADR through the study of various ADR vehicles such as arbitration and mediation. In addition to developing an academic understanding of the appropriate use of ADR and the procedural posture upon which cases move into and through ADR, students are also given an opportunity to engage in mock ADR hearings both as counsel for the litigants in a hypothetical case, and as the neutral conducting the hearing. Finally, students are given the opportunity to prepare certain documents typically associated with ADR hearings such as Arbitration Briefs, Mediation Briefs, etc. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 702a Business Associations - 3 Hours

This course covers the formation of agency relationships, partnerships and corporations, the fiduciary duties of agents, directors and officers, shareholder voting, shareholder lawsuits, rules around corporate disclosures, insider trading, and corporate control transactions. Particular attention is given to the way in which corporations organize and operate. The course also examines the respective roles, relationships, and liability exposure of shareholders, directors, and officers. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 753 Trial Practice - 3 Hours

This is a practical skills course in advocacy that introduces students to the fundamental components of a typical civil and criminal trial. It requires students to perform exercises involving each component, and try a mock civil or criminal case from provided problem materials. The course requires student participation in discrete exercises, including jury voir dire, opening and closing statements, presentation and objections to evidence, and direct and cross-examination. Course meets practical skills requirement. Prerequisites: LA671i and LA672i Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 763 Family Law - 3 Hours

This course studies the legal aspects of the relationships associated with marriage and parenthood, including spousal and parental rights and responsibilities, children's rights, marital dissolution, annulment, unmarried cohabitation, child custody, illegitimacy, adoption, and guardianship. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 764 Community Property - 2 Hours

This course focuses on the principles of California's community property system, contrasting those principles with the treatment of assets in common law jurisdiction. This course analyzes how California classifies different types of assets which a couple might acquire during the course of a marital relationship. In particular, we will discuss how California classifies personal injury awards, pensions, disability benefits, professional degrees, bonuses, credit acquisitions, and jointly-titled assets. Practical problems and solutions are emphasized. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 783i Criminal Procedure - 3 Hours

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of important issues of criminal procedure arising during the investigation and early stages of prosecution of crimes. Topics include constitutional limits on arrests and stops, search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, right to counsel, exclusionary rule, identification procedures, and the privilege against self-incrimination. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 783x Criminal Procedure - 3 Hours

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of important issues of criminal procedure arising during the investigation and early stages of prosecution of crimes. Topics include constitutional limits on arrests and stops, search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, right to counsel, exclusionary rule, identification procedures, and the privilege against self-incrimination. Delivery Mode: JD Flex Track.

LA 790b Jurisprudence - 3 Hours

This course requires substantial reading in each of the following general categories: Classical natural law, contemporary natural law, Law and Economics, critical studies, postmodernism, law of the family, and critical gay theories. Minor readings also required in legal positivism. The class also should provide the students with a working familiarity with Thomas Aquinas' Treatise on Law, Oliver Wendell Holmes' The Path of the Law, and John Rawls' A Theory of Justice. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 803 Wills, Trusts, and Estates - 3 Hours

This course examines rules pertaining to intestate succession, testamentary dispositions, execution, modification, and revocation of wills, testamentary capacity and will contests, interpretation of wills, protection of spouse and children, and the use of will substitutes. The creation, types, and characteristics of trusts are also examined, including coverage of the construction of trusts, trust administration, and wealth transfer taxation. Fiduciary administration issues also are considered. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 822a Remedies - 3 Hours

This course analyzes the judicial remedies available in the American system of jurisprudence. The course familiarizes students with compensatory and punitive damages, preliminary and permanent injunctions, restitution and unjust enrichment, rescission, declaratory judgments, attorneys' fees, and pre-judgment interest. The course will also cover claims for and defenses to quiet title, reformation, fraudulent conveyances, subrogation, contribution, indemnity, and replevin. The course will also include discussions of recent developments in the law of American remedies as well as important practical issues regarding enforcing money judgments, initiating and prosecuting contempt proceedings, and obtaining writs of attachment and other pre-judgment remedies. The course will conclude with discussions of equitable and other remedies available to defendants, such as unclean hands, unconscionability, waiver, estoppel, laches, statutes of limitations, and California SLAPP laws. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 870 Civil Litigation Skills - 2-3 Hours

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop an approach to the pleading and discovery aspects of litigation. The course covers drafting and opposing pleadings, preparing a discovery plan, drafting and responding to written discovery, preparing witnesses for depositions, and deposition skills in accordance with the California Code of Civil Procedure. Successful completion of Evidence 1 & 2 and Civil Procedure 1 & 2 are prerequisites for this course. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 870a California Civil Procedure and Evidence - 2 Hours

This course examines the California Code of Civil Procedure and the California Evidence Code, and contrasts them with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Federal Rules of Evidence. The course is designed to prepare students to address these content areas on the California Bar Examination. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 870b Civil Litigation Skills - 3 Hours

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop an approach to the pleading and discovery aspects of litigation. The course covers drafting and opposing pleadings, preparing a discovery plan, drafting and responding to written discovery, preparing witnesses for depositions, and deposition skills in accordance with the California Code of Civil Procedure. Course meets practical skills requirement. Prerequisites: LA 671i, LA 672i, LA 673b, and LA 674b. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 872 Advanced Legal Writing: Skills and Strategies - 2 Hours

This course is designed to strengthen students' legal writing skills. Students will learn to choose the right words, organize their thoughts, and convey arguments as precisely and succinctly as possible. Coursework will include exercises, revisions of existing legal documents, peer editing, and several writing projects. The course will also review and reinforce, through additional practice, the principles of effective research and writing, including citation. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 891b Juvenile Dependency - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the principles of California?s Juvenile Dependency law system as found in the Welfare and Institutions Code, particularly section 300 filings. There are evidentiary, civil procedure, constitutional law, and criminal law crossovers. This course extensively covers the WIC code and all relevant case law, child welfare and foster care system, Due Process rights of families in that system, and the specific roles of parent?s counsel, minor?s counsel, and county counsel. Students demonstrate knowledge of the Due Process rights of families in that system, and the specific roles of parent?s counsel, minor?s counsel, and county counsel by presenting evidence and arguments in mock proceedings of detention hearings, jurisdictional and dispositional hearings, statutory review hearings, and hearings to terminate parental rights. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 901 Introduction to International Human Rights - 3 Hours

This course introduces the student to the history, theory, and legal development for the systematic protection of human rights throughout the world. The course considers the theological and philosophical foundations of human rights; the primary sources of human rights law; the role of non-State actors, including nongovernmental organizations like Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch; important debates regarding legitimacy, compliance, efficacy, national sovereignty, responses to mass violence, universal jurisdiction, and more. It also equips students to critically examine the strengths and weaknesses of the human rights protection system from a Christian perspective. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 910 The Right to Life and the Law - 3 Hours

This course studies the complex medical, social, legal, and ethical issues raised by topics such as abortion, euthanasia, and infanticide. The course includes a survey of Supreme Court and other judicial decisions pertaining to these issues. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 914 Rights of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples - 3 Hours

This course explores international legal mechanisms to protect the rights of minorities, and especially of indigenous peoples. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 916a Human Trafficking - 1 Hour

This course will examine trials of domestic human trafficking cases, from jury selection to closing argument, as well as the legal challenges to combating this crime. Students learn about the current understanding of human trafficking in California and the advocacy against human trafficking, including the recruitment of victims, the typical trafficker, and the laws that affect trafficking and its prosecution. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 916c Human Trafficking: Prosecution of Domestic Cases - 1 Hour

This class focuses on the advocacy and trial aspects of prosecuting domestic human trafficking cases from jury selection to closing argument. Students learn about the central understanding of human trafficking in California and the advocacy against it. This includes the realities of human trafficking from recruitment of victims, the typical trafficker, the laws that affect trafficking, and the prosecution of trafficking. The course gives a basic overview of a human trafficking jury trial and discusses how to advocate for or against the trafficker during trial. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 919 International Forum on Human Rights (Europe) - 2 Hours

This course is held in Europe in conjunction with the annual program of the International Institute of Human Rights. The course introduces the theological and philosophical foundations of human rights, including the history, theory, and legal development of human rights protections. Students hear from experts in the field, and visit numerous sites important to the study of human rights. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 920a International Institute of Human Rights (Europe) - 4 Hours

This course, held annually in Strasbourg, France, covers recognition and protection of human rights under international law. The course introduces the international and regional systems for protection of human rights, and considers the primary sources of human rights law and important debates regarding legitimacy, compliance, efficacy, national sovereignty, and more. The course enables students to interact with human rights lawyers, judges, government officials, academics, and activists from around the world. The course is presented in conjunction with the International Forum on Human Rights. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 922 Public International Law - 3 Hours

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of international law and the way it functions (or fails to function) in global society, covering: the history and sources of international law; the relationship between international law and domestic law; state sovereignty, territory, and jurisdiction; immunities; state responsibility; the use of force, self-defense, terrorism, and peaceful settlement of disputes; the law of the sea and the environment; the law of human rights, armed conflict, and international crimes; and more. The course will rely on important cases, treaties, and other instruments, as well as films and news reports, to examine traditional problems and current events. The course would be an excellent introduction for students who plan to go, or who would like to but cannot go, to Cambodia or Strasbourg. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 923b International Criminal Law - 1 Hour

This course examines issues in the field of international criminal law which encompass individual responsibility for conduct that is labeled as criminal under international law, nation-state responsibility for conduct that may be considered a crime under international law, and individual responsibility for conduct with international dimensions that is labeled a crime under U.S. domestic law. The course will expose students to the prosecution, trial and punishment of individuals alleged to have committed crimes considered to be among the most serious violations of international humanitarian and human rights law including genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 953 Legal Internship - 1-6 Hours

Internships/Externships combine academic training in lawyering skills and professional responsibility with practical experience working for a judge, district attorney, public defender, government agency or non-profit law office. Interns/Externs work under the supervision of experienced practicing attorneys or judges who provide guidance and training in research, writing, and practical lawyering skills. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 957 Law Practice Management - 2 Hours

This course covers the practical aspects of opening a law practice, forms of practice, legal assistants and the use of systems for professional and business functions, timekeeping and fees, bookkeeping, client relationships, the law office staff manual, library and retrieval systems, calendar and monitor systems, essential equipment and law office layout, and developing a practice. The course also discusses the business and ethical issues and the personal pressures encountered in the solo or small firm practice. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 957a Law Practice Management - 3 Hours

This course covers the practical aspects of opening a law practice, forms of practice, legal assistants and the use of systems for professional and business functions, timekeeping and fees, bookkeeping, client relationships, the law office staff manual, library and retrieval systems, calendar and monitor systems, essential equipment and law office layout, and developing a practice. The course also discusses the business and ethical issues and the personal pressures encountered in the solo or small firm practice. Finally, this course covers the methods, standards, and procedures utilized by the accounting profession in the preparation and issuance of financial and accounting documents. The course objective is the familiarization of legal professionals with the nomenclature and processes incorporated in accounting reportage and to enable legal professionals to become conversant with accounting principles so as to be more effective in interpreting financial reports and advising clients. Course meets the practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 958 Law as a Vocation - 1 Hour

This course explores the foundations of the lawyer's calling. Participants will discuss the foundations of the idea of "professionalism," the religious roots of the idea of "calling" in the context of ordinary work outside the local congregation, and the implications for these ideas on a philosophy of lawyering. The course will also address the practical consequences of the fundamental view of the lawyer's vocation. Delivery mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 959g Trinity Mediation Clinic - 2 Hours

This clinical course operates in conjunction with the Orange County Superior Court and Waymakers. It is designed to give students hands-on experience providing mediation services to the disputants and operates under the direction of a Trinity Law School professor who is a professional mediator and licensed attorney. As mediators, the students act as third-party neutrals to help the litigants facilitate a resolution of their pending lawsuits. This clinic equips students who may be interested in entering the field of alternative dispute resolution or those who would like to integrate peacemaking principles intp their own legal practice. Course meets practical skills requirement. Prerequisite: LA675a. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 959i Trinity Law Clinic - 1-2 Hours

The Trinity Law Clinic provides students the opportunity to participate in an off-campus poverty law clinic while earning elective credit. The program is a partnership with the Orange County Rescue Mission and primarily serves the residents of the mission. The program is designed to give students hands-on experience providing legal advice and services to the poor of Orange County under the direction and supervision of a Trinity Law School professor and licensed attorney. Students will observe and conduct client interviews, research legal issues, complete and file court forms, and in various ways assist clients in pursuing resolution to their legal issues. Legal issues vary widely, but often include family law, criminal law, and debt collection relief. Students participating in the clinical program are expected to be present at the Village of Hope in Tustin every Friday during the semester from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. to meet with Rescue Mission clients. Occasionally, meeting times may vary due to data entry or appointments that require more attention. Select students may participate in this program, and are chosen through an application and interview process. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 959j Trinity Law Clinic - 1-2 Hours

The Trinity Law Clinic provides students the opportunity to participate in an off-campus poverty law clinic while earning elective credit. The program is a partnership with the Orange County Rescue Mission and primarily serves the residents of the mission. The program is designed to give students hands-on experience providing legal advice and services to the poor of Orange County under the direction and supervision of a Trinity Law School professor and licensed attorney. Students will observe and conduct client interviews, research legal issues, complete and file court forms, and in various ways assist clients in pursuing resolution to their legal issues. Legal issues vary widely, but often include family law, criminal law, and debt collection relief. Students participating in the clinical program are expected to be present at the Village of Hope in Tustin every Friday during the semester from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. to meet with Rescue Mission clients. Occasionally, meeting times may vary due to data entry or appointments that require more attention. Select students may participate in this program, and are chosen through an application and interview process. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 959k Trinity Mobile Legal Clinic - 1 Hour

The Mobile Legal Clinic provides students the opportunity to participate in an off-campus poverty law clinic while earning elective credit. The program is a partnership with the Orange County Rescue Mission and operates as a ?law office on wheels,? primarily serving the residents of the Mission?s facilities around Orange County. The program is designed to give students hands-on experience providing legal advice and services to the poor of Orange County under the direction and supervision of a Trinity Law School professor and licensed attorney. Students will observe and conduct client interviews, research legal issues, complete and file court forms, and in various ways assist clients in pursuing resolution to their legal issues. Legal issues vary widely, but often include family law, criminal law, and debt collection relief. Select students may participate in this program, and are chosen through an application and interview process. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 959n Trinity Religious Liberty Clinic - 1 Hour

This clinical course is a partnership with the Pacific Justice Institute and operates on the campus of Trinity Law School. PJI is a non-profit providing pro bono legal services to churches and individuals primarily in cases involving the defense of religious freedom, parental rights, and other civil liberties. This research and writing-intensive clinic is designed to give students the unique opportunity to hone legal writing skills while under the supervision of an attorney specializing in Constitutional law. Students are exposed to writing various trial and appellate level documents including complaints and amicus briefs for current cases. Students' research and writing will directly contribute to important religious freedom matters. Course meets practical skills requirement. Prerequisites: LA 600 and LA 601. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 959o Trinity Religious Liberty Clinic - 2 Hours

This clinical course is a partnership with the Pacific Justice Institute and operates on the campus of Trinity Law School. PJI is a non-profit providing pro bono legal services to churches and individuals primarily in cases involving the defense of religious freedom, parental rights, and other civil liberties. This research- and writing-intensive clinic is designed to give students the unique opportunity to hone legal writing skills while under the supervision of an attorney specializing in Constitutional law. Students are exposed to writing various trial and appellate level documents including complaints and amicus briefs for current cases. Students' research and writing will directly contribute to important religious freedom matters. Course meets practical skills requirement. Prerequisites: LA 600 and LA 601. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 959t Trinity Mediation Clinic - 3 Hours

This clinical course operates in conjunction with the Orange County Superior Court and Waymakers. It is designed to give students hands-on experience providing mediation services to the disputants and operates under the direction of a Trinity Law School professor who is a professional mediator and licensed attorney. As mediators, the students act as third- party neutrals to help the litigants facilitate a resolution of their pending lawsuits. This clinic equips students who may be interested in entering the field of alternative dispute resolution or those who would like to integrate peacemaking principles into their own legal practice. Course meets practical skills requirement. Prerequisite: LA 675a. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 959u Trinity Religious Liberty Clinic - 3 Hours

This clinical course is a partnership with the Pacific Justice Institute and operates on the campus of Trinity Law School. PJI is a non-profit providing pro bono legal services to churches and individuals primarily in cases involving the defense of religious freedom, parental rights, and other civil liberties. This research and writing-intensive clinic is designed to give students the unique opportunity to hone legal writing skills while under the supervision of an attorney specializing in Constitutional law. Students are exposed to writing various trial and appellate level documents including complaints and amicus briefs for current cases. Students' research and writing will directly contribute to important religious freedom matters. Course meets practical skills requirement. Prerequisites: LA 600 and LA 601. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 959v Trinity Immigration Clinic - 3 Hours

The Trinity Immigration Clinic provides an opportunity for students to address immigration issues for underserved populations. Under the supervision of a Trinity Law School professor and supervising attorney, this clinic works with non-profit non-government organizations (NGO) to provide legal services in areas such as asylum, Temporary Protected Status, Adjustment of Status, removal, and other immigration-related issues. The clinic includes instruction on representation, case analysis, interviewing, case preparation, and generally on serving client needs. Course meets practical skills requirement. Prerequisite: LA 995f. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor. Remote/Online.

LA 960 Administrative Law - 3 Hours

This course covers the basic principles of administrative law, including issues of delegation of legislative and executive power to agencies, statutory and constitutional due process, statutory interpretation by agencies, standards of judicial review of agency decisions, and the prerequisites of judicial review. This class is especially useful for understanding the rights of individuals, interest groups, and regulated business entities when they confront rules or enforcement actions by regulatory agencies (e.g., Evironmental Protection Agency, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Social Security Administration, Federal Trade Commission, Federal Communications Commission, and Bureau of Indian Affairs). Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 962a Intellectual Property - 3 Hours

This course examines patents, copyrights, trademarks and trade dress, and trade secrets. In particular, this course analyzes what is required to obtain each type of intellectual property (IP) right, what is required to infringe each type of IP right, what defenses are available to accused infringers of each type of IP right, and what remedies for infringement are available to IP rights holders. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 962d Intellectual Property - 1 Hour

This course examines patents, copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets, and other intellectual property rights. The course analyzes the rights and remedies associated with each type of intellectual property that it covers, as well as the relationships between different types of intellectual property. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 970 Independent Study/Guided Research - 1-6 Hours

This course offers individualized research on an approved topic under the supervision of a law professor. The Registrar must approve any independent study. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 982a Law and Literature: Revenge, Justice, and Mercy - 1 Hour

This course examines the nature of law and justice through the medium of literature. We will explore how literature addresses revenge and mercy, and their place in the pursuit and achievement of justice, particularly in our legal system. Readings will include Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice, Aeschylus' Agamemnon, short stories from Flannery O'Connor and Andre Dubus, and selections from Holy Scripture. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 984c Religion and the Law - 3 Hours

This is an advanced course that examines critical issues of law and religion, including the theological foundation of law and the legal foundation of theology, the relationship between church and state, religious civil liberties, religious discrimination and accommodation, and the principles of law and regulations relating to churches and religious organizations. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 984d Law, Religion, and Public Policy - 3 Hours

This course surveys the interaction between law, religion, and public policy as a basis for forming individual patterns of public engagement and establishing habits toward good citizenship. Topics range from the interaction of law and religion, the role of faith in forming legal judgment, and the public engagement of the church in the contested public square. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 987 SHRM-CP/SCP Exam Prep - 3 Hours

This course combines expert instruction with the official Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) certification preparation tool: the current SHRM Learning System. As an official SHRM Education Partner, TLS offers this course which is a comprehensive and effective way to prepare for success on the SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP exam while completing the JD degree. This course covers HR strategy, talent acquisition, employee engagement and retention, learning and development, total rewards, and the structure of the HR function. Additionally, this course examines organizational effectiveness and development, workforce management, employee and labor relations, technology management, managing a global workforce, risk management, corporate social responsibility, and U.S. employment law and regulations. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 988a Criminal Law and Psychology - 1 Hour

This course covers the psychology of criminal trial practice, encompassing the strategy of evaluating and presenting criminal cases. It will discuss the science and practice of preparing a criminal case, from arraignment through sentencing, incorporating both the prosecution and the defense perspective. Topics include initial case assessment; interpersonal dynamics between clients, victims, and witnesses; using experts; selecting case theory; and the psychology of jury selection. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 988b Domestic Violence Law - 1 Hour

This course provides an overview of domestic violence issues, teaches critical thinking through analysis of domestic violence topics, and demonstrates how the issue of domestic violence arises within a variety of legal settings, through examining both the historical aspects and the latest developments in each of these settings. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 989 Moot Court - 1-2 Hours

This course allows students to gain practical advocacy skills through researching, drafting, and arguing an appellate brief. The course may not be repeated for credit. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 991 Law Review - 1-3 Hours

This course allows students to participate in the publication of The Trinity Law Review. The Trinity Law Review is a legal journal that the student members edit and publish. Members are selected on the basis of academic achievement and a writing competition. Students receive credit for demonstrable competence in scholarly writing and editing. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 991a Law Review - 1 Hour

This course allows students to participate in the publication of The Trinity Law Review. The Trinity Law Review is a legal journal that the student members edit and publish. Members are selected on the basis of academic achievement and a writing competition. Students receive credit for demonstrable competence in scholarly writing and editing. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 992a California Dependency Law - 1 Hour

This course focuses on the principles of California?s Juvenile Dependency law system as found in the Welfare and Institutions Code, particularly section 300 filings. There are evidentiary, civil procedure, constitutional law, and criminal law crossovers. This course extensively covers the WIC code and all relevant case law; child welfare and foster care system; Due Process rights of families in that system; and the specific roles of parent?s counsel, minor?s counsel, and county counsel. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 992b California Dependency Practice - 1 Hour

This course focuses on the practices of California?s Juvenile Dependency law system as found in the Welfare and Institutions Code, particularly section 300 filings. Students demonstrate knowledge of the Due Process rights of families in that system and the specific roles of parent?s counsel, minor?s counsel, and county counsel by presenting evidence and arguments in mock proceedings of detention hearings, jurisdictional and dispositional hearings, statutory review hearings, and hearings to terminate parental rights. Prerequisite: LA 992a. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 993F Fundamentals of Federal Taxation - 3 Hours

This course examines the basic structure of federal income taxation. The course examines in detail the definition of gross income, fringe benefits, ordinary tax rates, and other tax policy considerations. In addition, the course examines the characterization of gains and losses from property and relevant deductions. The course also provides an overview of federal taxation of real estate transactions, taxation of business entities, estate and gift taxes, international taxation, and other related areas of federal taxation. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 994b Employment Law - 3 Hours

This course explores fundamental employment rights, public policies, and laws that regulate the workplace. The aim is to provide students with basic employment law concepts and vocabulary that will permit them to be sufficiently knowledgeable to identify employment law issues and engage in initial risk analysis. Topics will include employee and employer status, employment-at-will, employment contracts, disparate treatment, disparate impact, sex-based harassment/stereotype sex discrimination, age discrimination, religious discrimination, disability and leave laws, retaliation/whistleblowers, public policy/employment torts, privacy, employment duties, wage and hour, procedural matters, and remedies. The focus of the course will be on federal law such as Title VII, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Age Discrimination and Employment Act (some California laws will be highlighted as well). The final project will require students to analyze a substantive legal issue and provide a damages assessment. Please note: This course does not cover traditional labor law (e.g., collective bargaining or labor-management relations) or employee benefits. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 995al Accounting for Lawyers - 1 Hour

This course covers the methods, standards and procedures utilized by the accounting profession in the preparation and issuance of financial and accounting documents. The objective of the course is the familiarization of legal professionals with the nomenclature and processes incorporated in accounting reportage and to enable legal professionals to become conversant with accounting principles so as to be more effective in interpreting financial reports and advising clients. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 995f Immigration Law - 3 Hours

This course explores the foundation of immigration law and policy. The student will examine statutes, regulations, policy, and cases which form the basis of the law. The course emphasizes both a substantive understanding and practical application of the law with a review of the historical and legislative evolution of U.S. immigration law and policy. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 995nb Negotiation for Law and Business - 2-3 Hours

This course will survey negotiation skills in general including the areas of strategy, tactics, and planning. Specifically, the course will also consider relationships between the parties; multi-party negotiations; information bargaining; initial proposals; how to narrow differences; closure; competitive, cooperative and problem solving tactics together with negotiation counseling, alternative dispute resolution and identities in the context of culture, gender and race. Students will be called upon to complete reading assignments and prepare for and participate in in-class negotiation exercises. Course meets practical skills requirement. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 995np Law of Nonprofit Organizations - 3 Hours

This course is a study of nonprofit firms and the nonprofit sector. Topics include a survey of the role of nonprofits, theories and justifications of the nonprofit form, nonprofit statutes and other laws pertaining to nonprofits (e.g., the regulation of charitable solicitations), the formation, operation and dissolution of nonprofits, and tax and tax policy issues related to nonprofits. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 998b Domestic Violence - 1 Hour

This course provides an overview of domestic violence issues, teaches critical thinking through analysis of domestic violence topics, and demonstrates how the issue of domestic violence arises within a variety of legal settings, through examining both the historical aspects and the latest developments in each of these settings. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 998e Advanced Exam Approaches and Skills - 3 Hours

This skills-oriented course is designed to enhance the development of approaches to the essay, performance-style, and multiple choice components of the California Bar Exam. Emphasis is on the Multistate Bar Exam-tested subjects, the refinement of skills employed in identifying issues, utilizing effective approaches, and organizing answers for purposes of essay exam writing, joined with tactical approaches to selecting best responses to multiple-choice questions, the non-multiple-choice essay, and performance style subjects tested on the California Bar exam. The students are given the opportunity to build their skills in approaching the issues and organizing effective answers through participation in practice exams and workshops. This course is specifically NOT a substitute for bar-review courses undertaken near the end of, or after the conclusion of, the student's law studies. Rather, these courses are offered as a substantive course for advanced students to further develop and refine their exam issue spotting, analysis, organizational, and writing skills. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 999cr 42 USC Section 1983: Civil Rights Violations - 1 Hour

This course examines 42 U.S.C. section 1983, which allows individuals to sue the government for civil rights violations. We will discuss when and how one can sue the government and which governmental immunities may preclude lawsuits against it. We will explore the topic through doctrinal analysis, popular literature, and cinema. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 999g Civil Disobedience and the Christian Lawyer - 1 Hour

This course briefly covers which law binds the conscience of a Christian by an exploration of biblical exegesis and philosophical theology. We will discuss whether one ought to obey unjust laws through the study of ancient literature and film. Students will have an opportunity to study what happens when the legal institutions themselves are under attack both domestically and abroad. Questions will be explored such as whether a lawyer can or should engage in civil disobedience from an ethical and pragmatic standpoint; and, if civil disobedience is undertaken, under which circumstances it should be undertaken and how one should prepare oneself and one?s clients for such an undertaking. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 999i Client Interviewing and Counseling - 2 Hours

The course will focus on the legal principles and skills involved in interviewing clients and witnesses and counseling clients in the course of litigation, dispute resolution, and decision making. Establishing an effective lawyer-client relationship requires that you gather information relevant to decisions to be made by your client, analyze the decision to be made, advise your client about the decision, and implement the decision. Additional topics include addressing cultural differences and interviewing and counseling clients with mental and physical disabilities, children, criminal defendants, and organizational clients. Students will participate in simulations of interviewing and counseling and will discuss the related ethical and professionalism concerns underlying the lawyer-client relationship. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 999w Workers' Compensation - 3 Hours

This course presents general statutory principles of workers' compensation theories throughout state jurisdictions. Content includes the history of the workers' compensation system, the nature of work injuries including accident and disease, compensation and benefits delivery, and courts and administrative rules and procedures. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 999y Civil & Criminal Sexual Misconduct - 1 Hour

This program covers a broad range of conduct that can qualify as civil or criminal sexual misconduct. From words, to actions, to electronic communication and social media, it examines a variety of different ways in which misconduct could subject a person, entity, or agency to legal liability. This program discusses the different internal and legal remedies for different types of sexual harassment and the accompanying behavior, along with how each process is initiated and the potential hurdles, including Statutes of Limitations and jurisdictional issues. This program discusses the blurred lines between sexual harassment and sexual assault, both behaviorally and legally. It discusses both verbal and physical boundary violations including personal questions, physical contact, inappropriate requests, and online boundary probing. Participants learn how to spot red flags and warning behaviors before conduct progresses to sexual assault. This program also covers the red flag relational dynamics involved in both types of invasive behavior, and how sexual harassers often graduate to committing sexual assault through insidious boundary violations. This program also addresses best practices to ensure a safe, harassment-free workplace for everyone through early detection, effective investigation, and an environment of empowerment and support. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LA 999z Reading People & Judging Credibility - 1 Hour

This course will reveal in an entertaining and interactive format, how to perceive the most important clues about other people, what it means, and how to use the information you glean in the practice of law. Delivery Mode: Traditional Juris Doctor.

LR 170X Leadership Dynamics - 3 Hours

This course will study the vital role and responsibilities of leaders within various organizations. Emphasis will be given to the study of a biblical concept of leadership, various leadership styles, spiritual gifts, personal development, leadership management, administration/delegation, change management, conflict management, and development of leadership staff. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Cross-listed with PSY 170X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

LR 173 Emerging Leadership I - 1 Hour

Students will explore principles and practices of leadership with emphasis on Christian Leadership. Through a series of activities, assignments and meetings in small groups, course participants will strengthen transferable leadership skills that they can use in every place that God sends them. Practical experience will be gained by students representing Trinity by partnering in service with other leaders and promoting the values of the university to demonstrate their growth and development as a leader. Prerequisite: Admittance into Emerging Leaders Program and permission of instructor. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

LR 174 Emerging Leadership II - 2 Hours

Students in this course will gain practical leadership experience by planning and conducting leadership events both on and off campus. Participants will be challenged to apply principles in organizing, group dynamics, motivation, delegation, and conflict resolution. In addition to the experiences offered in the Emerging Leaders program, students will complete a series of assignments designed to help them in their personal Christian leadership development. Prerequisites: LR 173 Emerging Leadership I and permission of instructor. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

LR 220 Practicum in Leadership - 1 Hour

This practicum is for students who hold approved leadership positions but who are not in executive roles. Qualifying leadership experiences must involve at least 20 hours of leadership responsibilities during a semester. Students are required to keep a leadership journal as well as complete a reflection paper and research paper dealing with topics related to leadership. Students will adhere to internship standards. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

LR 350 Topics in Leadership - 1-3 Hours

Selected topics as announced. Course may be repeated with different topic. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

LR 378X Servant Leadership - 3 Hours

This course is designed to move the student from theory to practice as it relates to being a Servant Leader (SL). Emphasis will be given to the strategic and tactical aspects of Servant Leadership with a pervasive focus given to evidencing a SL ethic. Servant Leader domains covered include: valuing people, developing people, displaying oneself authentically, building community, providing and sharing leadership. Prerequisite: LR 170X or LR 173 & LR 174 or PSY 140. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Cross-listed with PSY 378X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

LR 420 Practicum in Advanced Leadership - 1 Hour

This practicum is up for students who hold executive leadership positions in approved on-campus activities. Qualifying leadership experiences must involve at least 45 hours of practical leadership experience along with significant responsibility/oversight of others. Students will adhere to TIU internship standards including keeping a leadership journal, meetings with a Leadership Coach, and the completion of a reflection paper. May be repeated. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

LR 440 Practical Leadership Capstone - 1 Hour

This course challenges students to synthesize their leadership coursework and activities to prepare them for professional leadership positions. Students will reflect upon their leadership and growth and gain a greater appreciation of their individual leadership styles through tools such as ePortfolios, Personal Development Plans, Leadership Practices inventory, and integration papers. Upon completion of the course, students will receive an endorsement letter documenting their involvement in the Practical Leadership Program and citing their individual leadership strengths. Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of instructor. Course fee required. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

LR 470X Leadership Dynamics Practicum - 1-6 Hours

An advanced application course in leadership dynamics. Students will integrate leadership theory with experience in a practical setting, either on or off campus. Program specifics should allow students to practice all areas of leadership, including planning, implementation, and supervision. Practical experiences must be approved by the chair of either the Business or Psychology department. Enrollment is contingent upon completion of the College's internship contract, including the stipulation of course requirements. May be repeated for up to twelve total hours of credit. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and enrollment in an academic leadership program: the OL emphases, leadership emphases or minor in leadership. Offered each semester. Cross listed with PSY 470X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

LR 5001 Foundations for Integrative Thought in Leadership - 3 Hours

This course surveys the Bible from the standpoint of its unfolding history of creation, fall, redemption, and restoration, with special attention given to Scriptural applications of leadership theory and godly stewardship in the workplace. The course considers how precedents, themes, truths, and strategies that established God's will in earlier times provide direction for God's people today. Students will practice interpreting scripture responsibly and thinking creatively about current issues in leadership in the light of biblical principles. Offered face to face at Deerfield and Florida, and online.

LR 5002 Foundations for Cultural Engagement in Leadership - 3 Hours

This course introduces the student to pivotal Christian doctrines as a framework within which to evaluate the working assumptions of contemporary culture regarding influence, transformation, and effectiveness in leadership. In addition to investigating several models for Christian engagement with culture, the course encourages the positive formation of a Christian worldview as a foundation for wise interaction with contemporary thought about leadership. Offered face to face at Deerfield and Florida, and online.

LR 5010 Introduction to Leadership Dynamics and Perspectives - 1 Hour

This course defines leadership and develops an initial set of skills for the study, research, assessment, and development of learning within the leadership arena. Offered face to face/remote.

LR 5020 Ethical Frameworks and Leadership Integrity - 3 Hours

This course surveys the ethical, philosophical, and practical dimensions of the leadership domain. Students will gain a foundation in the ethical challenges of leaders past and present, and leadership theory criticism. The course also surveys the biblical narrative from the standpoint of its unfolding history of creation, fall, redemption, and restoration, with special attention given to Scriptural applications of leadership theory and stewardship in the workplace.

LR 5080 Creativity, Decision Making, and Innovation - 3 Hours

This course reviews state-of-the art theoretical and applied models of creativity and innovation as they apply to the assessment process. Students develop both the skills and the mindset to understand the critical nature of decision making as it relates to growth -- personally and organizationally. In addition, the course examines decision-making processes that impact culture, systems, conflict resolution, and rewards that motivate and incent creativity and innovation.

LR 5300 Contemporary Issues in Leadership-Global Leadership Summit - 2 Hours

The need of developing a Biblical and practical strategy for leadership in organizations, non-profits, and international networks is the content of this "wrap-around" course. Students will also address several key issues facing leaders today and develop a customized plan for their organization's work. This course is conducted in cooperation with attendance at the Global Leadership Summit, but is the full responsibility of the Trinity Graduate School of Trinity International University. May be repeated in succeeding years. Offered Online.

LR 5570 Organizational and Team Communication - 3 Hours

A study of communication in the context of informal and formal teams, as well as organizations of various sizes and different degrees of complexity. The course will include research about communication in nonprofit and for-profit settings.

LR 5820 Global and Cultural Leadership - 3 Hours

Students in this course explore the variety of ways our world has become, and is increasingly becoming, interconnected while simultaneously remaining fragmented and how these two forces impact leadership dynamics.

LR 5890 International Practicum - 3 Hours

The fieldwork in this practicum is designed to provide supervised experience in an international Christian setting to help students develop and reflect on leadership. The opportunity is intended to provide exposure to different cultural, philosophical, and practical bases for functioning effectively in an international leadership setting.

LR 6020 Vision, Strategy, and Culture Development - 3 Hours

Students in this course are challenged to develop both the mindset and skill set of communications in various organizational situations. Specifically, the course focuses on the importance of evaluating the working assumptions of contemporary culture and investigates several models for Christian engagement with culture. The course focuses on the power of vision and strategy, reinforced and lived out in transformative culture. The course encourages the positive formation of a biblical worldview as a foundation for wise interaction with contemporary thought about leadership.

LR 6030 Leadership and Effective Financial Management - 2 Hours

This course investigates the personal and organizational ethics and processes of financial management. Topics include gaining skills in budgeting, acquiring wealth, utilizing capital, managing resources, and gaining a faith-based accountability in handling finances.

LR 6050 Organizational Change and Transformation - 3 Hours

This course examines the role of the organizational leader as a transformative change agent and a framework for understanding how to drive change through others in the organization. The course addresses topics such as leading change, adaptation of roles for organizational effectiveness, and developing other leaders.

LR 6100 Topics in Leadership - 1-3 Hours

Selected topics as announced. Course may be repeated with different topics.

LR 6130 Leadership Research - 2 Hours

This course is designed to equip learners with the basic skills in both qualitative and quantitative research techniques, including assessing initiative outcomes in applied organizational contexts.

LR 6150 Applied Leadership Project - 1-3 Hours

This course is used as the applied project component of either a previously taken undergraduate course or a graduate course without an included project. Students will conduct an approved mentor-directed project in a leadership role related to course. Leadership program director approval required. May be repeated for credit.

LR 6520 Developing, Coaching and Empowering Leaders - 3 Hours

Course provides the opportunity for students to acquire a clear understanding of coaching and mentoring as leadership tools. Students learn coaching skills, become familiar with coaching models, are exposed to a variety of assessment techniques, and reflect on ethical and other professional issues in the world of coaching and mentoring. Another vital element of this course is to empower and release leaders to grow in effective delegation and increased responsibilities. Offered spring semester.

LR 6550 Driving Organizational Effectiveness and Results - 3 Hours

This course examines people systems and processes with the view of laying a foundation of operations that achieves outcomes, fosters collaboration, and promotes significant engagement in the endeavors of the organization. Offered fall semester.

LR 6720 Followership - 2 Hours

This course is a study of leadership through understanding the leader-follower relationship. This increasingly important dynamic to the leadership domain will examine the significance of how subordinates can and should ethically relate to their superiors and the impact this relationship dynamic has on an organization.

LR 6750 Understanding and Exploring Entrepreneurial, Intrapreneurial, and Joint Venture Organizations - 3 Hours

Understanding and prompting a perspective of exploration and entrepreneurship is the thrust of this course. It lays a foundation to develop the attitude and skills for organizational and personal effectiveness in this field. Offered spring semester.

LR 6760 Entrepreneurial Organizational Design and Development - 3 Hours

This course examines the formation of a structure for planning which promotes creative endeavors in the organization. It examines such topics as risk management, the acceleration of the learning organization, and other factors that an entrepreneurial environment demands. Offered spring semester.

LR 6770 Leading Start-Ups and New Organizational Forms - 3 Hours

Innovation in the organization is the focus of this course, especially in relation to start-up business, ministry, and global endeavors. The course also focuses on renewal of existing organizations to develop the attitude and skills for the future. Offered fall semester.

LR 6811 Social and Cultural Understanding for Leadership - 2 Hours

This course will equip students to investigate diverse social and cultural contexts with attention to macro level issues such as globalization, ethnicity, and poverty, as well as the more interpersonal dynamics of culture-based differences regarding communication, values, lifestyles, and leadership. Special attention is paid to critical self-awareness and the impact of cultural difference within an organization.

LR 6880 Organization Development & Design - 2 Hours

Selected topics in organization development and design as announced. Course may be repeated with different topic.

LR 6890 Managing & Reproducing Multi-Site Organizations - 2 Hours

Selected topics in multi-site organizations as announced. Course may be repeated with different topic.

LR 6920 Transformational Leadership and Nonprofit Social Enterprises - 3 Hours

The content of the course focuses on helping learners develop the skills and abilities for effective human resource management including developing job descriptions, interviewing and selection, development, and separation. Special attention will be given to using volunteers in nonprofit organizations. Offered spring semester.

LR 6940 Essentials of Nonprofit Financial Management - 3 Hours

This course helps students address the financial needs specific to nonprofit organizations including bookkeeping, cash management, budgeting, financial statement interpretation, fundraising, capital campaigns, grant writing, and donor relationships. Offered spring semester.

LR 6960 Driving Operational Excellence in Nonprofit Organizations - 3 Hours

The specifics of working for a nonprofit organization are presented. Content includes strategic planning and various issues in nonprofit constituency management. These include the development and utilization of volunteer boards of directors, volunteer recruitment and management, and media and crisis management. Offered fall semester.

LR 7400 Leadership Comprehensive Examination - 0 Hours

This course is for students who opt for taking additional leadership coursework in place of writing a capstone. Procedures for an extensive pass/fail examination over the content and practical material of the MA in Leadership program are available from the program director. The comprehensive exam should be taken in the last semester before graduation. Offered every semester.

LR 7468 Leadership Capstone Literature Review - 1-2 Hours

This is a guided research course in the area of a student's particular interest and is intended to facilitate the research process of the capstone project or integrative paper. This would generally be taken the semester before the capstone or integrative paper and would help to facilitate the proposal process. Offered every semester.

LR 7478 Leadership Capstone Project - 2-3 Hours

A student may choose to do a final project in a research-based practicum requiring a practical leadership component or an integrative paper for their capstone. This should be chosen in collaboration with a faculty advisor. The research and project or integrative paper will be presented before student colleagues and faculty readers. The capstone will reflect approximately eighty-four clock hours of work (for 2 credit hours) or 126 clock hours of work (for 3 credit hours). Counts as half-time academic status in Florida. Offered every semester.

LR 7486 Leadership Capstone Extension - 0 Hours

A one-semester extension for LR 7478. Enrollment with consent of the faculty member of record. Extension fee. No Credit.

LR 7501 Guided Research in Leadership - 1-3 Hours

This elective provides an opportunity to conduct a major project (typically writing a major paper) on a leadership topic of special interest. Students may arrange such a course in any term with an appropriate faculty advisor. May be repeated for credit.

MA 117 Mathematics in the Modern World - 3 Hours

This is a general education course designed especially for non-science majors. The course will further develop the quantitative skills and reasoning ability of such students. It will serve as an introduction to some of the great ideas and relevant applications found within the discipline of mathematics. Includes problem-solving strategies, functions and their graphs, probability, statistics, and the mathematics of finance. Additional topics may include Fibonacci numbers, cryptography, infinity, fractals, chaos, tiling, knots, voting theory, game theory, and fairness. This course cannot be taken as a prerequisite for MA 121. Prerequisites: high school Algebra II course and minimum ACT Math score of 17 (or minimum SAT Math score of 400); or MA 116. Delivery mode: online, and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

MA 119 College Algebra - 3 Hours

This course deals with concepts related to algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, systems of equations, and exponential and logarithmic functions as applied to practical life problems. Offered on demand for Florida undergraduate. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

MA 200 Mathematical Concepts - 4 Hours

This course is designed especially for elementary education majors. Content includes all concepts normally emphasized in the contemporary elementary school. Special concern is given to the introduction and development of the operations on the set of whole numbers by using appropriate teaching methods. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

MA 204 Mathematics for Elementary Educators - 3 Hours

This course is designed especially for elementary education majors. Content includes All concepts normally emphasized in the contemporary elementary school. Special attention is given to the introduction and development of the operations on the set of whole numbers by using appropriate teaching methods. Credit obtained in this course is not applicable toward meeting the general education Math requirement of the college. Delivery mode: Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

MA 280X Introductory Statistics - 3 Hours

An examination of both descriptive and inferential statistics. Specific topics include the scientific method, data analysis and production, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression, random sampling and probability, nonparametric inferential tests, and parametric inferential tests including one-way analysis of variance. Credit obtained in this course does not fulfill the major requirements in psychology (for Deerfield traditional and Florida undergraduates) or business (for Deerfield traditional undergraduates) or the minor requirement in sociology. (Florida undergraduate business majors take PSY 280X as part of the major.) Delivery mode: Online and Florida undergraduate.

MA 445 Internship - 1-6 Hours

The opportunity to work in a business or professional organization to analyze and interpret data, to develop concepts, and to engage in problem solving. Prerequisites: Instructor approval and permission of the Dean of the College. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

MA 450 Independent Study - 1-4 Hours

Research and specialization studies designed to meet the needs of individual students. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

MA 498 Professional Experience - 0-1 Hours

A supervised experience in one or more professional environment(s) which demonstrates the student's ability to relate knowledge and skills developed in the major to practical tasks in the workplace, graduate school, or professional school. Requires at least 45 clock hours of prepared, supervised, and evaluated experience which demonstrates practical application of major-related knowledge and skills. The professional experience must have prior approval by the department. Offered each semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

ME 5000 Global Mission and the Local Church - 2 Hours

Survey of the theology, history, culture, politics, and methods of the Christian mission, with special emphasis on recent developments, crucial issues, and future trends, ending with a careful study of missions in the local church.

ME 5001 Evangelism and the Local Church - 2 Hours

This course introduces the biblical, theological, historical, and practical foundations of evangelism in word and deed. Students will be equipped to engage others in gospel conversations and prepared to lead churches and Christian organizations to participate in God's mission of reaching their contexts with the good news.

ME 5050 Perspectives on the World Christian Movement - 3 Hours

The course surveys the history, theology, and strategy of the global advance of the gospel. Specific instances of the growth of the Christian movement in selected areas of the world are examined. Perspectives is offered as an occasional course at various locations throughout the year. Contact the Extension Office for details.

ME 6410 History of the Expansion of Christianity - 2 Hours

A study of the expansion of Christianity from Pentecost to the present. Particular attention is given to an examination of the modern Protestant mission movement.

ME 6610 Anthropology for Ministry - 2 Hours

Application of anthropological and sociological insights for ministry in diverse cultural settings, with special attention to fundamentals of culture communication and contextualization. The course will focus anthropological understanding particularly on congregational contexts and ministry.

ME 6760 Theology of Mission & Evangelism - 2 Hours

The many Old and New Testament texts that provide theological foundations for the global mission of the church are examined. Basic issues that confront the missionary will be investigated, as well as the more complex and contemporary issues. The course provides the student with various perspectives and strategies for dealing with the Trinity, the Great Commission, the call and motivation for ministry, and the problems of dialogue, syncretism, universalism, and ecumenism.

ME 6963 Principles of Discipleship - 2 Hours

A practicum with attention given to the way Christian disciples are developed, with practical guidelines for implementing discipleship, both as a personal lifestyle and within the context of the local church. Prerequisite: must have completed at least six semester hours.

ME 7300 World Religions - 2 Hours

Historical survey of the origin and growth of the major world religions, beliefs, practices, and worldviews of the major traditions will be examined, with special attention given to comparison and contrast with Christian beliefs and practices.

ME 7450 The Church in Latin America, Africa, and Asia since 1500 - 2 Hours

A broad overview of the significant shift of the center of Christianity from the West to Latin America, Africa, and Asia. While consideration is given to early modern Roman Catholic missions and nineteenth and twentieth century Protestant missions, particular attention is focused on the role of indigenous Christians in the emergence and development of national churches.

ME 7465 Intercultural Ministries Internship - 1-2 Hours

The MA/ICS Capstone of an applied experience, required for students with limited cross-cultural experience.The internship is designed for the formation of cross-cultural ministry identity under the guidance of field mentors. Qualified mentors must be approved by the Chair of the Mission and Evangelism Department.

ME 7477 MA Major Comprehensive Exam - 0-1 Hours

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some MA programs. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

ME 7478 MA Project - 0-3 Hours

A department-specific summative program project (MA/E, MA/CM) as arranged with the department of concentration. Not available in all programs.

ME 7485 MA Thesis - 0-3 Hours

MA thesis writers register for ME 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

ME 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for ME 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

ME 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

ME 7510 Missional Church - 2-3 Hours

This course explores the missional church in light of a theology of God's mission in the world, and post-Christian context. Special attention is given to various streams of missionality, community engagement of the gospel in word and deed, missional communities, disciple making, discernment, and leadership.

ME 7710 Gospel in Cultural Context - 2-3 Hours

This course addresses the task of making faithful disciples and developing transformational ministries that are both faithful to scripture and appropriate to specific cultural contexts. Models of integrating biblical interpretation and cultural exegesis are introduced and applied to a variety of issues such as evangelism, cultural traditions and norms, social justice, worship and ecclesial forms. Case studies of contextualization in diverse cultural settings are examined.

ME 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

ME 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

ME 8000 Seminar: Current Issues in Mission and Evangelism - 1-4 Hours

Topics chosen deal with significant issues in mission and/or evangelism. Opportunity provided for seminar discussion and for the presentation of advanced research papers.

ME 8210 Intercultural Communications - 2-3 Hours

This course focuses on the theory and practice of interpersonal communication across cultural lines. Specifically designed for those involved in intercultural ministry, the course focuses attention on language and culture, culture shock, ethnocentrism, paternalism, nonverbal communication, contextualization, and dynamics of change. The focus will, of course, be on the communication of the gospel itself interculturally.

ME 8215 Teaching Across Cultures - 2-3 Hours

An examination of factors contributing to effective teaching and learning when teacher and learners are from different cultures. Cultural influences upon cognitive style, logical processes, worldview, social relations, modes of learning, and learning environments will be analyzed. Implications for teaching in specific cultural settings will be drawn with attention to learning outcomes and cognitive development.

ME 8230 Global Church Planting and Development - 2-3 Hours

This course examines both theologically and practically the planting and development of healthy, reproducing congregations in various cultural settings. Methods, models, strategies, and particular challenges are discussed. Offered annually.

ME 8250 Leadership Development and Culture - 2-3 Hours

The course will investigate theological, philosophical and anthropological foundations of leadership and culture. These foundational issues will inform the practice of developing multicultural leaders and working under leaders from different cultures. Special emphasis will be given to the missionary role of multicultural leadership in a world where missionaries from every country of the world are partnering with missionaries and church leaders from every country of the world.

ME 8300 Global Theologies - 2-3 Hours

This seminar examines the roots and current developments of Christian theologizing within the context of world Christianity. It seeks to help students explore the nature and methodology of theology in the contemporary world, the effects of culture and intercultural differences on the theological process and the development of globally informed theology. Students are encouraged to develop and approach to Christian theology that is relevant, orthodox, and creative, and to cultivate a lifelong commitment to scholarship and writing.

ME 8315 Christian Encounter with Islam - 2-3 Hours

A study of Muhammad; the Qur'an; and the history, culture, and theology of Islam, together with modern trends and its confrontation with Christianity in order to develop appropriate Christian ministries in Muslim contexts.

ME 8317 Global Migration and Diaspora of Faith Communities - 2-3 Hours

This seminar course examines historical patterns and current dynamics of global migration, sociologically analyzing contributing factors. In particular, the course will examine how today's growing phenomenon of global migration impacts diaspora religious communities and global missions, identifying both new missional opportunities and concerns.

ME 8325 Culture, Ethics, and Social Change - 2-3 Hours

Understanding of human cultural and psychological realities related to culture, ethics, values, and social change. This includes topics such as sin, guilt, shame, conscience, and morality. Cultural and psychological understandings are integrated with biblical and theological understandings to communicate the gospel and to disciple believers in a manner which is intelligible, subjectively relevant, and meaningful to people of specific cultures.

ME 8380 Religion in the Modern World - 2-3 Hours

The past three centuries have produced far-reaching social and intellectual transformation, initially in the West and now increasingly worldwide, which have significantly affected traditional religions and also produced an array of new religious movements and alternative spiritualities. Modernization, secularization, globalization, colonialism, and nationalism, as well as various counter-modernizing movements, all have had an impact upon current religious realities. Theoretical issues in the relevant literature, as well as specific application to particular Islamic, Hindu, or Buddhist contexts, will be considered. Implications of these patterns for Christian ministry and mission will be explored.

ME 8390 Gospel, Cultures, and Church in Western Contexts - 2-3 Hours

This course exposes students to the literature and issues related to reaching people, engaging cultures, and rethinking the Church in Western Contexts. Attention will be given to various postmodern and post Christendom historical currents and dynamics affecting ministry and mission today, including pluralism, globalization, secularism, popular culture, ethnic diversity, post colonialism, and the rise of diverse spiritualities. Social science research on the religious development and diversity among emerging adults will especially be emphasized. The gospel will then be examined theologically and historically as it relates to the diversity of spirituality in the modern world. Fresh expressions and innovative leaders of contemporary missional church movements will serve as case studies of this engagement between gospel and cultures in the West.

ME 8450 History of Evangelism - 2-3 Hours

An examination of evangelism throughout the history of the Church. Special attention is given to particular Christian movements and personalities, highlighting contributions to gospel proclamation and witness of the Church in word and deed. Application of selected practices are considered for evangelism in contexts today.

ME 8500 Missional Disciple-making - 2-3 Hours

This course examines the way Christian disciples are formed, with particular attention to biblical and practical foundations for making disciples that include contextual, missional engagement, with the goal of mission in the world. Students examine various models of disciple making, especially those practiced today within the missional church movement.

ME 8730 Theology of Religions - 2-3 Hours

A seminar focusing on the biblical and theological understanding of non-Christian religions. Participants will examine the critical issues facing the church in light of biblical teaching and current conflicting ideas and theories regarding human religions. Attention will be given to religious diversity among humans, truth, and salvation in religions.

ME 8815 Ethnicity: Modes of Inquiry and Analysis - 2-3 Hours

This seminar focuses on the importance of ethnicity for mission, theology and ministry. Participants employ anthropological, historical, biblical, and theological approaches to the exploration of ethnicity as they develop skills required for Christian life and work in a world of ethnic diversity. Ideally, the seminar on Race and Theology should follow.

ME 8875 Church, Mission, & Community Development - 2-3 Hours

Seminar participants are introduced to the community development literature and critically examine how it relates to the church's responsibility to engage in a mission to the poor that is distinctly holistic -- an approach based on Christ's ministry. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of nonformal education in facilitating development. Offered alternate years.

ME 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for ME 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

ME 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-2 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for ME 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

ME 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for ME 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

ME 9000 Contemporary Issues in Intercultural Studies - 4 Hours

Topics chosen deal with contemporary issues in missions. Recent seminars include Cross-Cultural Theology and Intercultural Competencies for Missionaries.

ME 9001 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. Available in all PhD programs. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours in PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS programs; may be repeated for a maximum of six hours in the PhD/THS program. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

ME 9050 Prolegomena: Missiology as a Discipline - 2 Hours

This seminar provides an introduction to the academic discipline of missiology and principles of missiological research and writing. It includes an overview of classical and current publications in the field and an examination of the integrative relationship between theology, history, and the social sciences in Christian mission. Students will also receive an orientation to the TEDS PhD ICS study program.

ME 9060 Theories and Methods of Missiological Research - 4 Hours

An introduction to various approaches to the academic study of missiology, from qualitative and quantitative empirical methods to theological and historiographic methods. Academic writing, use of library and archival sources, ethics in research and related topics will also be addressed. To be taken during the first 24 credit hours of the PhD ICS program.

ME 9260 Teaching Missions and Evangelism in Higher Education - 2 Hours

A Praxis-oriented course involving actual teaching experience under the guidance of an experienced professor to prepare students for teaching mission and/or evangelism in higher educational settings. Included also is an introduction to adult learning theory, course design, instructional methods, course evaluation, student relations, and other practical aspects of the teaching vocation. Student for it as a reading course in consultation with the PhD/ICS program director.

ME 9325 Sociology for Mission and Evangelism - 4 Hours

An introduction of the field of sociology and the contributions it makes to the discipline of missiology. Attention will focus on issues such as globalization, new religious movements, gender, social capital, communication and media. Theoretical foundations and methodological questions will be introduced, and practical implications for ministry will be explored.

ME 9400 History of the Expansion of Christianity - 4 Hours

A study of major missiological themes throughout the history of the global expansion of the church, with special emphasis on the modern Protestant missionary movement. Writings of exemplary mission historians will be examined for their contribution to our understanding of contemporary trends in world mission practice and strategy. Attention will be given to the missionary encounter with culture in its various historical contexts.

ME 9610 Anthropology for Missions and Evangelism - 4 Hours

An introduction of the field of anthropology and the contributions it makes to the discipline of missiology. The seminar encourages participants to develop a model they can use in studying and ministering in specific societies and cultures. Attention is given to a study of the issues involved in cross-cultural communication, contextualization, and social transformation in evangelism and church planting in cross-cultural settings.

ME 9700 Theology of Mission & Evangelism - 4 Hours

A doctoral seminar focusing on the theology of mission in the Old and New Testaments with special attention to the operation of the Trinity, the missio Dei, the purpose and tasks of mission, church and mission, the nature and necessity of evangelism, historical developments in theology of mission, and current theological issues in Christian mission.

ME 9890 Professional Development Practicum - 0-2 Hours

Participants design, conduct, and evaluate at least one professional development activity. Program participants may repeat the course multiple times, not to exceed a total of 2 hours over the course of the degree program. These integrative and generative activities could take the form of teaching, consulting, developing curriculum, coaching, pastoral ministries, grant writing, etc. Participants may propose non-Trinity or Trinity-related activities and opportunities. Each student is responsible to initiate conversations toward PDP planning with their program director prior to the semester in which the practicum will be conducted. All activities must be conducted after program matriculation. One credit hour is equivalent to approximately 35-40 hours of invested practicum work. Credit/No Credit.

ME 9922 Qualitative Research Methods - 4 Hours

This course teaches various qualitative methods oriented towards intercultural mission and congregational ministry: participant observation, interviewing, how to write field notes, the use of audio and video in field settings, how to 'code' verbal data, and so on. Other topics include ethical issues in research, the place of theory in qualitative research, proposal writing for qualitative research, and recent controversies over how one 'represents' others in one's writings. Recommended prerequisite: ME 9060.

ME 9970 Orientation for Comprehensive Exam and Dissertation - 1 Hour

This course is taught as a workshop addressing the purpose, expectations and methodology of preparing for the comprehensive exam, dissertation proposal, and dissertation writing. It includes class instruction, reading of exemplary field statements and proposals, and active participation in the various oral hearings. Counts as full-time student status when concurrently enrolled for 2 hours of ME 9975 or 6 regular course credit hours, affirms that a total minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in study, and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when the student is concurrently enrolled for 1 hour of ME 9975 or 3 credit hours of regular course work, the registrant affirms that a total minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in study, and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office.

ME 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 1-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/ICS program participants may repeat the course twice for a total of three hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ME 9990 Dissertation Proposal Preparation - 1-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. PhD/ICS program participants may repeat this course twice for a total of 3 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ME 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Courses taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ME 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.

MH 5120 Substance Abuse Counseling - 3 Hours

The course focuses on the process and treatment of substance abuse. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the addictive process, assessment, physiology (as pertinent), and treatment. Relapse prevention, adolescent substance abuse, dual diagnosis, family treatment, and other specific issues related to addictions will be discussed. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 5120R Substance Abuse (Reading) - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the process and treatment of substance abuse. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the addictive process, assessment, physiology (as pertinent), and treatment. Relapse prevention, adolescent substance abuse, dual diagnosis, family treatment, and other specific issues related to addictions will be discussed. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 5140 Principles of Guidance and Counseling - 3 Hours

A course covering the philosophy, functions, management, and operation of a counseling and guidance program in elementary and secondary schools. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 5145 School Consultation Procedures - 3 Hours

A course focusing on developing specific techniques in consultation. The various aspects of a school guidance program are integrated. Particular reference is made to problem solving and the utilization of available data. Case examples specific to the school setting are discussed, and opportunities for skill development are provided through role-playing. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 5145R School Consultation Procedures (Reading) - 3 Hours

School Consultation Procedures (Reading)

MH 5210 Counseling Skills Training - 3 Hours

An experiential and cognitive introduction to the skills basic to any counseling setting, working with a developmental model of helping. Emphasis on the acquisition and use of some of the basic skills of counseling. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 5310 Counseling Theories - 3 Hours

Classical and current theories of counseling will be studied and evaluated in the light of Scripture, psychological sophistication, and practical relevance. Both secular and practical counseling approaches will be discussed. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 5400 Foundations of Mental Health Counseling - 3 Hours

This is an orientation to the various dimensions of mental health counseling. It provides an overview of the variety of roles, functions and credentialing available to the mental health worker in society and in the church. The central theme to explore is what it means to pursue a professional identity, answer a vocational calling and nurture a Christian theological understanding of ethical practice in a pluralistic culture.

MH 6015 Community Counseling - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the central theoretical perspectives of community psychology, the role of interpersonal therapeutic relationships, and the efficiency of system-level preventative interventions. With this orientation, professionals can help individuals in need and work to remedy community problems, while serving to assist both individuals and society in general. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 6015R Community Counseling (Reading) - 3 Hours

Community Counseling (Reading)

MH 6110 Career Counseling - 3 Hours

This class will deal with the many facets of career counseling. The subject will be covered from both theoretical and practical points of view. Holistic awareness of individuals will be considered in regard to how people deal with their vocational needs and goals. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 6130 Group Counseling - 3 Hours

The processes, principles, and techniques related to contemporary forms of group counseling will be explored. There is an experiential component built into this course to foster the development of group leadership skills. Prerequisite: MH 5210. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 6140 Counseling Exceptional and At-Risk Children - 3 Hours

A course covering the etiology and characteristics of exceptionalities of children at risk for underachieving and dropping out. Also covered is the role of the guidance counselor in identifying such problems, drawing on available resources, and making appropriate referrals. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 6520 Human Growth and Development - 3 Hours

A consideration of human growth and development from conception to death emphasizing research, personality, and counseling implications at each stage. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 6530 Child & Adolescent Counseling - 3 Hours

A survey of the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of children and adolescents. Therapeutic skills are discussed and practiced in and out of the classroom. The importance of family relationships is given special emphasis. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 6610 Human Sexuality - 3 Hours

This course will deal with the physiological, psychological, and spiritual aspects of human sexuality with particular emphasis on counseling-related issues, including the assessment and treatment of sexual dysfunction and addiction. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 6625 Theoretical Foundations of Marriage & Family Therapy - 3 Hours

An examination, discussion, and evaluation of the theoretical foundations and the historical development of the field of marriage and family therapy. Introduction of several of the major techniques currently employed in the field. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 6650 Multicultural Issues in Counseling - 3 Hours

A study of communication issues arising out of counseling between persons of different cultures or subcultures. Emphasis is given to overcoming cultural barriers and to understandings and techniques designed to enhance intercultural communication. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 6710 Psychology and Theology - 3 Hours

A survey of issues, theories, approaches, methods, problems, and criticisms of the integration of psychology and theology. The course will sample current counseling approaches, literature, and case studies to familiarize the student with the process of integration and to facilitate personal skill development in this area. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 6710R Psychology & Theology (Reading) - 3 Hours

Psychology & Theology (Reading)

MH 6720 Ethics & Issues in Counseling - 3 Hours

Ethical standards of the major professional counseling associations are considered, including the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, the American Counseling Association, and the American Psychological Association. Theoretical and practical applications of ethical guidelines to a variety of counseling situations are discussed. Issues related to the professional practice of counseling and therapy are included. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 6911 Guidance & Counseling Practicum I - 3 Hours

This practicum is designed to provide students an opportunity to perform the role and functions of the professional school counselor under supervision in a school setting. Both field-based and program-based supervision are components of the practicum experience. Prerequisites: Program candidacy and permission of department. This course counts as half-time status. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 6912 Guidance & Counseling Practicum II - 3 Hours

This practicum is designed to provide students a continued opportunity to perform the role and functions of the professional school counselor under supervision in a school setting. Both field-based and program-based supervision are components of the practicum experience. Prerequisites: MH 6911; Program candidacy and permission of department. This course counts as half-time status. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7140 Crisis Counseling - 3 Hours

A consideration of the theory and practice of crisis intervention. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical and practical application of dealing with developmental and situational crises from a Christian perspective. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7210 Psychological Testing - 3 Hours

Principles and techniques of test administration and interpretation, including measures of aptitude, personality, and psychopathology. Prerequisite: Undergraduate statistics course. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7450 Psychopathology - 3 Hours

An advanced course on the etiology, classification, and treatment of human psychopathology. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7478 Counseling Psychology Capstone Project - 3 Hours

Independent study culminating in a counseling psychology-related project, as arranged with the program director or designate. Students should register for this course the semester that they start the project. This course counts as half-time status. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7480 Counseling Psychology Capstone Integrative Paper - 3 Hours

Independent study culminating in an integrative paper. Students should register for this course the semester they start the paper. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7486 Counseling Psychology Capstone Extension - 0 Hours

A one-semester extension for MH 7478 or MH 7480. Counts as half-time student status when registrant affirms that a minimum of twenty hours per week are invested in the capstone. Capstone Extension fee required when not in enrolled in other courses. Offered at the Florida campus. No Credit.

MH 7501 Guided Research in Counseling Psychology - 1-3 Hours

Independent study as arranged with a graduate school faculty member. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7900 Psychological Research Methods - 3 Hours

Critical review of basic research techniques and examination of the methods and conclusions of some representative research. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in statistics. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7910 Advanced Research Methods - 3 Hours

This course will consider more complex research designs and techniques. It will include information about statistics and statistical computer packages. Required for students who write a thesis. Prerequisite: MH 7900 Psychological Research Methods. Offered at the Florida campus. Three hours.

MH 7950 Counseling Practicum - 3 Hours

This practicum is designed as a pre-internship fieldwork experience. It will provide students with practical supervised experience in various counseling settings. The student will average 20+ hours per week onsite. This course may be repeated for credit. This course counts as half-time credit. Prerequisites: Program candidacy and permission of department. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7961 Internship in Counseling I - 3 Hours

This internship is designed to give counseling students practical supervised experience in various counseling facilities. Approved intern sites include hospital inpatient programs, counseling centers, community agencies, churches, and other counseling service facilities. This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence with the students averaging 20+ hours per week involvement. Individual supervision is provided on site. Group supervision is provided on campus. Prerequisites: Program candidacy and permission of department. This course counts as half-time status. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7962 Internship in Counseling II - 3 Hours

This internship is designed to give counseling students practical supervised experience in various counseling facilities. Approved intern sites include hospital inpatient programs, counseling centers, community agencies, churches, and other counseling service facilities. This course is the second semester of a two-semester sequence with the students averaging 20+ hours per week involvement. Individual supervision is provided on site. Group supervision is provided on campus. Prerequisites: MH 7961; program candidacy and permission of department. This course counts as half-time status. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7963 Advanced Counseling Practicum - 3 Hours

This practicum is designed to provide post-internship counseling experience for advanced students. Students will average 20+ hours per week on site. This course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: MH 7961 and MH 7962, permission of department. This course counts as half-time status. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7969 International Counseling Experience - 3 Hours

This course is designed for those participating in non-licensure counseling experience, primarily in international settings. International students and others who are not seeking U.S. licensure but who may benefit from a supervised international counseling experience may apply. Individual onsite supervision is required. Prerequisites: MA in MH candidacy and consent of the department. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7985 Counseling Psychology Thesis - 3 Hours

Independent study toward development of an academic thesis. Required of all students choosing to write a thesis. Students may not register for this course until the semester after the thesis proposal has been approved. Prerequisites: MH 7910 Advanced Research Methods, program candidacy, and permission of program director. Offered at the Florida campus.

MH 7986 Counseling Psychology Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

Up to three semesters extension for MH 7985 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis and with the consent of the Program Director. This counts as half-time student status when registrant affirms that a minimum of twenty hours per week is invested in the capstone. Extension fee required when not enrolled in other courses. No Credit.

MH 8000 Current Studies in Counseling and Psychology - 1-3 Hours

Topics selected deal with significant issues related to counseling and psychology. Recent titles include Adjunctive Treatment Topics and Domestic Violence: Abuse Across the Lifespan. Offered at the Florida campus.

MLS 400 Human Resources Compliance - 3 Hours

This course examines the institutional models and regulatory schemes governing the management of employees in the workplace. Topics include a survey of the creation, maintenance and termination of the employment relationship, employee/employer duties, employment protections, torts in the workplace, workplace privacy and workplace safety and health. Delivery mode: traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 410 Staffing and Compensation Administration - 3 Hours

This course examines the planning for and implementation of the management of the hiring and compensation of employees. Topics include wage and hour regulations, workers' compensation, unemployment compensation, personal leave laws, other employment benefits regulations and Federal pre-emption of state wage and benefit laws. Delivery mode: traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 414 Employment Discrimination - 3 Hours

This course examines the legal rules and public policies surrounding employer practices and employee claims sounding in discrimination against members of protected classes or in hostility in the workplace. Topics include the state and federal regulations governing employment discrimination; employer planning, best practices and prevention of claims; and the legal processes for determination and redress of discrimination in the workplace. Deliverty mode: traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 415 Labor Law and ADR - 3 Hours

This course examines the legal and policy implications of employee organization, bargaining and dispute resolution. Topics include employee organization -formal or informal, collective bargaining laws and processes, state and Federal regulation of organizing and bargaining, and arbitration of labor and employment disputes. Delivery mode: traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 421 Performance Assessment - 3 Hours

This course examines the institutional models for assessing the efficiency and contractual performance of employees. Topics include organizational planning for and implementation of standards and expectations on the part of employees and management, the efficient, fair, and ongoing assessment of management and worker performance, and the imposition of rewards for satisfactory performance and the remediation for under-performance. Delivery mode: traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 450 SHRM-CP/SCP Exam Prep: Core HR Strategies and Functions - 3 Hours

This course combines expert instruction with the official Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) certification preparation tool: the current SHRM Learning System. As an official SHRM Education Partner, T:S offers this two-part course which is a comprehensive and effective way to prepare for success on the SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP exam while completing the MLS degree. MLS 450 covers HR strategy, talent acquisition, employee engagement and retention, learning and development, total rewards, and structure of the HR function. MLS 450 is a prerequisite for MLS 451; MLS 451 must be taken within the same calendar year as MLS 450. Delivery mode: traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 451 SHRM-CP/SCP Exam Prep: Organizational Effectiveness and Risk Management - 3 Hours

This course combines expert instruction with the official Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) certification preparation tool: the current SHRM Learning System. As an official SHRM Education Partner, TLS offers this two-part course which is a comprehensive and effective way to prepare for success on the SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP exam while completing the MLS degree. MLS 451 covers organizational effectiveness and development, workforce management, employee and labor relations, technology management, managing a global workforce, risk management, corporate social responsibility, and U.S. employment law and regulations. Prerequisite MLS 450. MLS 451 must be taken within the same calendar year as MLS 450.Delivery mode: traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 505 Philosophy and Theology of Justice - 3 Hours

This course surveys foundational sources in history, philosophy, Christian theology, and the Bible as the basis for law, justice, and governmental order in the United States. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 521 Contracts - 3 Hours

This course studies the fundamentals of contract law, including the common law and selected portions of the Restatement (Second) of Contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code. Topics include remedies, offer, acceptance, discerning the agreement, the parol evidence rule, Statute of Frauds, flaws in the agreement process, unconscionability, third-party interests, enforceability, consideration, promissory estoppel, performance and non-performance, warranties and conditions, breach, and defenses. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 523 Contract Drafting and Analysis - 3 Hours

This course teaches students practical contract drafting skills, including how to translate a business deal into contract concepts, how to draft each of a contract's parts, how to draft with clarity and without ambiguity, how to negotiate a contract, and how to review and analyze a contract. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 531 Criminal Law - 3 Hours

This course teaches students how to deal with substantive criminal law problems in both practical and policy terms. The course inquires into the proper scope and objectives of criminal law, limitations on the State's power to define criminal liability, and general principles of liability and defenses for offenses against the person and property. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 540 Human Trafficking - 3 Hours

This course in an overview of the global issue of trafficking in persons for forced labor or sexual exploitation; examination of factors that contribute to the issue and how it is being addressed through legal, economic and other solutions. The course will also examine applicable international conventions and the United States policy responses to human trafficking. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 541 Torts - 3 Hours

This course examines common and modern law dealing with compensation for injuries to persons and property. Topics include intentional torts and defenses, negligence and defenses, strict products liability, strict liability, defamation, invasion of privacy, nuisance, misrepresentation, vicarious liability, survival actions, wrongful death, immunities, and torts affecting businesses and familial relationships.Delivery mode: traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 543 Human Trafficking and Economic Development--Cambodia - 3 Hours

This is an advanced course in human trafficking and economic development. Students will analyze and discuss current issues in human trafficking, focusing on sex trafficking in Southeast Asia. Students will learn the history of human trafficking, and how human trafficking is combatted in the modern world. Students will also learn about economic development in Southeast Asia, and how it is a modern way of combating human trafficking. Trinity Law School teaches this course from a Christian perspective and actively incorporates Biblical principles into the curriculum. Thus, this class/trip has three major aspects or themes to it: (1) basic concepts and laws relevant to human rights; (2) human trafficking; and (3) the role and relationship of worldviews and economic factors and development or lack thereof to human rights and human trafficking. Delivery Mode: Traditional Graduate.

MLS 558 Legal Fundamentals - 3 Hours

This course introduces American law, including the sources of law, the constitutional system, and the judiciary. This course gives an overview of major legal doctrines in the United States, with a special emphasis on Civil Procedure, Property Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, and Criminal Procedure.Delivery mode: traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 565 Juvenile Law and Delinquency - 3 Hours

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of important issues surrounding juvenile delinquents and different stages of prosecution of these crimes. Topics include theories of causations of delinquency, gangs, drugs, interventions, court procedures, different types of consequences available for punishment, search and seizure, and interrogation of juveniles. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 567 Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Criminal Justice - 3 Hours

This course examines the ways in which race, ethnicity, and gender impact the offender through the criminal justice system. The course considers crimes and justice patterns, overrepresentation of racial and ethnic minorities, policies, and reintegration into society. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 568 Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Criminal Justice - 3 Hours

This course examines the ways in which race, ethnicity, and class impact the offender through the criminal justice system through both a cultural and Christian worldview. The course considers the relationship between law enforcement and communities of color as well as how one's race, ethnicity, and/or class may affect prosecutorial discretion when it comes to charging, plea bargaining, sentencing, the death penalty, and indigent counsel. Additionally, this course examines the use of imprisonment in the United States as well as reentry into the community. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online and accelerated.

MLS 570 Forensic Mental Health - 3 Hours

This course provides an overview of the laws pertaining to the evaluation of a criminal defendant's mental health and how the diagnosis of a mental illness may impact juvenile and adult criminal proceedings. Topics covered include the role of forensic mental health experts, mental defenses and trial practice. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 572 Victimology and Restorative Justice - 3 Hours

This course covers the relationship between victims and their offenders, interaction between victims and the criminal justice system, the impact of crime on victims' families and the reintroduction of offenders to society. The course will focus on the Christian view of reconciliation and the reintroduction Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 573 Cyber Criminology - 3 Hours

This course covers the relationship between victims and their offenders, interaction between victims and the criminal justice system, the impact of crime on victims' families and the reintroduction of offenders to society. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 575 Law and Theory of Corrections - 3 Hours

This course introduces students to penology, probation, punishment theory, and trends in alternatives to institutionalization. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 600 Constitutional Law - 3 Hours

This course covers the powers of the federal government and selected topics regarding the relationship of the branches of the federal government to each other and to the States, as well as selected topics regarding the Bill of Rights, due process, equal protection, and the effect of the Fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the States. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 660 Property - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the acquisition, disposition, and use of personal and real property. Topics include the nature of ownership and possession, bailment, adverse possession, common law classifications of estates in land, concurrent ownership, present and future interests in land, and landlord-tenant law, transfers of interests in real property, real estate contracts, legal descriptions, conveyances and deeds, recording systems, title insurance, private land-use restrictions (easements, covenants, and equitable servitudes), public land-use regulations, eminent domain, and regulatory takings. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 670 Alternative Dispute Resolution - 3 Hours

This course provides students with foundational skills for helping people resolve conflict outside of court using peacemaking principles. In this intensive-style Christian Alternative Dispute Resolution course, students are taught to utilize critical thinking and peacemaking principles necessary for resolving personal conflict, and to practice personal peacemaking skills. Personal peacemaking is a prerequisite to acquiring advanced skills necessary for assisting others resolve conflict through Christian Mediation and Arbitration. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 675 Mediation - 3 Hours

This course will present the use of third party intervention as an alternative collaborative process for dispute resolution. Analysis of the skills needed to be an effective mediator. Ethical and practical limitations on the use of mediation. This course will include simulated mediation exercises. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 680 Negotiation Theory and Practice - 3 Hours

The course covers the theory and practice of negotiation as a process to reach contractual agreements and resolve disputes. The course examines negotiation strategies, Christian principles and ethical issues to develop a Christian approach to negotiation. This course will include simulated negotiation exercises. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 685 ADR in the Workplace - 3 Hours

Exploration of the background and the types of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) procedures that are used in both the union and non-union workplace to resolve labor and employment disputes. This course introduces students to the ADR mechanism such as negotiation, mediation and arbitration long used and widely accepted in the unionized setting for more than 100 years and grown drastically in the non-union sector for the recent years. The course examines the common law, including the U.S. Supreme Court decisions, and statutory law dealing with arbitration and mediation issues arising from the workplace. Delivery Mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 686 Cross Cultural Dispute Resolution - 3 Hours

This course will examine the impact of cultural differences on resolution of interpersonal and international disputes. Examines cultural differences such as long-term versus short-term horizons, risk aversion and individual/community expectations. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 691 Conflict Management in Business and Nonprofit Organizations - 3 Hours

This course presents an overview of the litigation process and its advantages/disadvantages in dispute resolution. The course will also focus on how organizations have effectively developed and institutionalized programs tailored to manage conflict among employees and managers. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 700 Introduction to Bioethics - 3 Hours

This course is an overview of the ethical issues in health care and biotechnology that make up the field of bioethics. Biblical-theological and other prominent contemporary perspectives are developed and assessed. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 700b Intensive Bioethics Institute - 3 Hours

This course surveys the Bible from the standpoint of its unfolding history of creation, fall, redemption, and consummation, with special attention to Scriptural applications of ethical thought and ramifications for ethical behavior. The course considers how precedents, themes, truths, and strategies that established God's will in earlier times provide direction for God's people today. Students will practice interpreting scripture responsibly and thinking creatively about current bioethical issues in the light of biblical principles. Offered as in-person 6-day intensive at the Deerfield, IL campus (BE 5100). Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 702 Business Organizations - 3 Hours

This course covers the formation of agency relationships, partnerships and corporations, the fiduciary duties of agents, directors and officers, shareholder voting, shareholder lawsuits, rules around corporate disclosures, insider trading, and corporate control transactions. Particular attention is given to the way in which corporations organize and operate. The course also examines the respective roles, relationships, and liability exposure of shareholders, directors, and officers. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 710 Current Issues in Bioethics - 3 Hours

This course addresses the current state of the law regarding a wide range of bioethical issues. With the help of case discussions, the course addresses questions such as how the law of bioethics responds to changes in moral, social, and political landscapes, and the proper role of law in shaping bioethical views and practices. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 710a Bioethics National Conference - 3 Hours

The annual national/international bioethics conference provides a unique opportunity to learn from and interact with Christian leaders in bioethics from around the country and beyond. The course includes a preconference reading program and post-conference writing program tailored to the topic of the conference. Class meetings with the professor immediately precede and are interspersed throughout the conference. This is a 3-day in-person intensive held at the Deerfield, IL campus (BE 5900). Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 710b Bioethics Regional Conference - 3 Hours

The regional bioethics conferences held by Trinity International University in various parts of the U.S. and world provide special opportunities to learn from and interact with Christian leaders in bioethics from around the country and beyond. The course includes a preconference reading program and post-conference writing program tailored to the topic of the conference. Class meetings with the professor take place at the conference. This is a 3-day in-person intensive course (BE 5800). Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 720 Landmark Cases in Bioethics - 3 Hours

This course covers the many of the major issues in bioethics have been shaped by pivotal medical and legal cases. The course examines those cases in detail and uses them as a springboard for understanding the larger ethical issues that they address. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 750 Bioethics Seminar - 3 Hours

This is a topical course conducted as a seminar on a question such as autonomy and informed consent, health care systems, resource allocation, genetic intervention, or end-of-life decision making. BE 7700 is the equivalent of this course (3-day intensive after Bioethics National Conference in Deerfield, IL in June). Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 760 Bioethics and Public Policy - 3 Hours

This course is an interface of bioethics and public policy in North American and international contexts, with special attention to religious perspectives in the public square; important cases and bioethics commissions; and other documents. Students will have the opportunity to create a public policy strategy as they become familiar with basic federal and state governmental structures and legislative processes. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 760a The Public Policy Context - 1 Hour

This course covers the explanation of basic federal and state governmental structures and legislative processes for students not already familiar with them. Designed to be taken concurrently with MLS 760b. Offered as guided study at the Deerfield, IL campus (BE 5499). Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 760b Bioethics and Public Policy - 2 Hours

This course is an interface of bioethics and public policy in North American and international contexts, with special attention to religious perspectives in the public square; important cases and bioethics commissions; and other documents. Students will have the opportunity to create a public policy strategy. Offered as a two-unit course for students familiar with basic federal and state governmental structures and legislative processes. Students must take MLS 760a concurrently with this course. Offered online and face-to-face at the Deerfield, IL campus (BE 5500). Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 783 Criminal Procedure - 3 Hours

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of important issues of criminal procedure arising during the investigation and early stages of prosecution of crimes. Topics include constitutional limits on arrests and stops, search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, right to counsel, exclusionary rule, identification procedures, and the privilege against self-incrimination. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 790 Advanced Bioethics Institute - 3 Hours

This course is a methodological investigation of how to do bioethics with a range of approaches critically assessed from a biblical-theological perspective. End-of-life treatment provides a test case. A national/international team of 15-20 top Christian bioethicists address special areas of expertise. This course is a 6-day intensive offered at the Deerfield, IL campus only (BE 6500). Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 800 Wills, Trusts, and Estates - 3 Hours

This course examines rules pertaining to intestate succession, testamentary dispositions, execution, modification, and revocation of wills, testamentary capacity and will contests, interpretation of wills, protection of spouse and children, and the use of will substitutes. The creation, types, and characteristics of trusts are also examined, including coverage of the construction of trusts, trust administration, and wealth transfer taxation. Fiduciary administration issues also are considered. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 830 Legal and Ethical Issues in Fundraising for Nonprofits - 3 Hours

This course examines the various approaches nonprofit organizations take to fundraising, including solicitation of monetary donations, in-kind gifts, planned giving and joint ventures with for profits. The legal implications of fundraising in each of these contexts, including the oversight of professional fundraisers will be addressed. The development of ethical standards for fundraising and the impact they have on the legal environment of fundraising will be addressed. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online and accelerated.

MLS 850 Exempt Organizations - 3 Hours

This course surveys government regulation and oversight of nonprofit organizations by federal and state tax agencies, and addresses the attorney's role in annual reporting requirements, managing unrelated business income, and bequests to charities. Nonprofit Law is a prerequisite for this class. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 855 Religious Organizations - 3 Hours

This course addresses the unique legal issues faced by religious organizations, with an emphasis on government regulation of religious organizations, the unique legal issues faced by churches, political activism by charities, and the handling of deputized giving and foreign charitable work. Nonprofit Law is a prerequisite for this class. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 860 Strategic Planning - 3 Hours

This course provides an overview and applications of strategic planning theories, methods, and group processes in different nonprofit organizational environments. The course will emphasize the application of strategic planning specifically to the mission, fundraising, operations and human resources of charities. Delivery mode: traditional, online, and accelerated.

MLS 861 Nonprofit Law - 3 Hours

This course is the foundation course for studying nonprofit and tax-exempt organizations, with an emphasis on governance issues. The course addresses formation, board responsibilities, fundraising, operations and dissolution. Application for tax exempt status and annual informational tax returns are surveyed in this class. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 870 International Non-Governmental Organizations - 3 Hours

This course will explore the world of international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) by reviewing the types of, and institutional issues related to, NGOs. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 901 International Criminal Law - 3 Hours

This course examines issues in the field of international criminal law, which encompass: individual responsibility for conduct that is labeled as criminal under international law; nation-state responsibility for conduct that may be considered a crime under international law; and, individual responsibility for conduct with international dimensions that is labeled a crime under U.S. domestic law. The course will expose students to the prosecution and punishment of individuals alleged to have committed crimes considered to be among the most serious violations of international humanitarian and human rights law, including genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 905 The Theory and Law of Armed Conflict - 3 Hours

This course studies the law of armed conflict (also known as the law of war and international humanitarian law) applicable in times of both international and non-international armed conflict, examining both the right of states to use force (jus ad bellum) and the rules governing conduct during conflict (jus in bello). Issues to be addressed include: the history, sources (e.g., treaty and custom), principles (e.g., proportionality, distinction), and application of this law; the obligations and protections of state and non-state combatants, non-combatants, civilians, and prisoners; permissible means and methods of warfare; and occupation and neutrality. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 910 The Right to Life and the Law - 3 Hours

This course studies the complex medical, social, legal, and ethical issues raised by topics such as: abortion, embryonic research, IVF, infanticide, and euthanasia. The course includes a survey of U.S. Supreme Court and other U.S. and international judicial decisions pertaining to these issues. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 913 The Rights of Vulnerable Persons: Women, Children and the Impoverished - 3 Hours

This course is a survey of the international treaties and bodies intended to protect the rights of women, children, and families. Issues to be addressed include pertinent international instruments and principles of international law relating to gender-based discrimination; violence against women; children's rights to privacy, education, and information; pornography; enslavement and servitude; child soldiers; and the implications of religious liberties on the family. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 914 The Rights of Minorities - 3 Hours

This course surveys international and regional efforts to articulate and protect the human rights of ethnic, racial, religious, linguistic, and national minorities, persons with disabilities, and indigenous groups. Related issues such as identity, autonomy, self-determination, xenophobia, nationalism, and racism will be addressed. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 916c Human Trafficking: Prosecution of Domestic Cases - 1-3 Hours

This class will focus on Domestic Human Trafficking. However, it will also focus on the advocacy and all aspects of trial presentation of Domestic Human Trafficking cases from jury selection to closing argument. Students will learn about the current understanding of Human Trafficking in California and the advocacy against Human Trafficking. This understanding includes the realities of Human Trafficking from recruitment of victims, the typical trafficker, the laws that effect trafficking and the prosecution of trafficking. This course will also give a basic overview of a human trafficking jury trial and discuss how to advocate for or against the human trafficker during trial. The first session will be a tutorial on domestic human trafficking with a broad overview of the subject including case studies from real situations. The second session will largely be a performance exam in which each student will perform the closing argument that they have prepared as if it were a real case to present to a jury. We will then discuss each presentation.Delivery mode: traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 920 International Institute of Human Rights - 4 Hours

This course covers the legal foundations for recognition, protection, and advocacy of human rights under international law. This unique course is taught over five weeks in June and July in The Hague, Netherlands and in Strasbourg, France. The course is presented in conjunction with the annual program of the International Institute of Human Rights, giving students the opportunity to study and network with law students, practitioners, and advocates from around the world. This also provides students with a first-hand experience of the competing views of human rights theories and practices.Delivery Mode: Traditional Graduate.

MLS 921 International Forum on Human Rights - 2 Hours

This course (held in The Hague, Netherlands and Strasbourg, France) is presented in conjunction with the annual program of the International Institute of Human Rights. Students will investigate and discuss the jurisprudence of human rights, including its history and development, as well as the theological and rival philosophical foundations for reflecting on the nature and scope of human rights. The doctrines of God, human nature, and the nature of civil society are of particular interest, as well as those concerning the Church, the family, the State, and vocation. Delivery Mode: Traditional Graduate.

MLS 923 Introduction to International Human Rights Law - 3 Hours

This course provides an introduction to international human rights law. Topics include the foundational and historical development of human rights, and the development of international and regional legal systems to protect human rights. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 951 Religious Liberty and the Law - 3 Hours

This is an advanced course that examines critical issues of law and religion both in the United States and internationally. Issues to be addressed include the theological foundation of law and the legal foundation of theology; the relationship between church and state; religious discrimination and accommodation; prohibitions on blasphemy, apostasy, and defamation; persecution of and by religion; and the principles of law and regulations relating to churches and religious organizations, schools, and the military. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 962 Real Estate Transactions - 3 Hours

This course presents the basic statutory and common law principles of the fundamental elements of a real estate transaction including arranging the deal, performing the contract, closing the contract, assuring title, financing the purchase, federal income tax considerations, and condominium and other communal arrangements for home ownership. Delivery Mode: Tradtional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MLS 995 Genocide and the Law - 3 Hours

This course introduces students to the laws governing the crime of genocide. Topics include efforts to name and identify incidents as genocide, and then to prosecute and punish the perpetrators. Students will also investigate specific occurrences of genocide in the Ottoman Empire, Nazi Germany, Cambodia, Rwanda, Darfur, Iraq and Syria, and other places. Delivery mode: Traditional graduate, online, and accelerated.

MN 9150 Interdisciplinary Courses - 3 Hours

Courses that provide insights from various disciplines in social sciences.

MN 9157 Thriving Immigrant Churches Workshop - 3 Hours

Wrap-Around Course: Embedded in two TICI gatherings in April and October and guided by a TEDS faculty member; students will have multiple opportunities to interact and collaborate with leaders from other immigrant churches to learn from one another. Students will attend only one TICI gathering either in April or October.

MN 9200 Strategic Leadership Courses - 3 Hours

Courses that equip students to lead teams, craft vision, design strategy, engage culture, navigate change, and develop other leaders.

MN 9207 Challenges and Opportunities Facing the Immigrant Church - 3 Hours

This course explores challenges and opportunities that are unique to immigrant churches. With increased awareness and understanding of what immigrant churches face from diverse perspectives, students will develop and implement creative strategies to overcome difficulties and maximize the opportunities for their congregations.

MN 9300 Pastoral Ministry and Care Course - 3 Hours

Courses here equip pastors to proclaim Biblical truth, provide care, create support structures, and engage crisis situations with confidence and grace.

MN 9307 Developing a Healthy Congregational Culture - 3 Hours

This course will explore a topic that is critical in the life of the church and yet is often overlooked: the formation of a congregational culture. Congregational culture impacts the shaping of the identity, mission, and spiritual formation of all local churches. Students will particularly focus on the immigrant church context and seek to understand what congregational culture is, why it is so essential in the formation of a healthy church, and how it can be reshaped.

MN 9400 Missional Engagement Courses - 3 Hours

Courses focus on understanding post-Christian culture and doing ministry in environments where a plurality of world views and faith systems are prevalent.

MN 9407 Shaping an Immigrant Congregation to be Healthy & Missional - 3 Hours

This course will explore ways to help immigrant churches move out of their ethnic enclaves and become effective agents for the gospel in a pluralistic world. Students will discuss the task of guiding immigrant church members to be more missional and Kingdom-minded and will explore ways to encourage immigrant church members to make healthy contributions as people of God in their surroundings and beyond.

MN 9550 Missional Leadership in Today's Church - 3 Hours

This foundational course, taken as the first course in your program, provides an overview of the DMin Program, addresses the issues facing pastors and leaders in today?s changing culture, and helps students begin to shape their Major Research Project proposal.

MN 9600 Biblical Studies Courses - 3 Hours

Courses that focus on analyzing and applying a particular book or genre of the Bible.

MN 9700 Theological Studies Courses - 3 Hours

Courses that examine themes about the nature of God and His work and reflect on their relevance to spiritual life and ministry.

MN 9800 Spiritual Formation Courses - 3 Hours

These courses address the spiritual practices essential for developing a culture of spiritual growth in the life of the church.

MN 9990 Research Methods - 3 Hours

Taken midway through the program, this course prepares students to design and implement a research project that addresses a problem or goal in the area of ministry where they are currently serving. Upon finishing the course, students secure their two readers and submit their proposal for approval.

MN 9991 Major Project Research - 1-3 Hours

Students implement their proposal from MN 9990, performing the research and writing the report to be submitted as their Major Project paper. May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours. Credit/No Credit.

MN 9992 Major Project Extension - 0 Hours

This extension code is used when a student is in the major project phase and has completed six credit hours of MN 9991 but needs more time to complete their major project.

MUH 121 Music Appreciation - 3 Hours

A study of the basic elements and history of music and of techniques of listening. Listening assignments will be given. Designed for the student with little or no background in music. Delivery mode: Online, Florida undergraduate.

NT 5000 Introduction to the New Testament - 3 Hours

Introductory survey of the New Testament, including the life and ministry of Christ, apostolic history, New Testament literature, principal critical issues, and the unity and diversity of New Testament theology. This course meets the NT General Comprehensive requirement for MA students and the English Bible competency requirement for MDiv students, who must meet the SBCT requirement. Not for credit in the MA/NT or MA/OT programs. Elective credit in MDiv program. Auditors are not permitted in General Comp courses unless they have taken previous undergraduate course work in the subject or are not intending to complete the MA program. Offered spring.

NT 5001 Introduction to the New Testament 1 - 2 Hours

Introductory survey of Matthew through Acts. This course meets the English Bible competency requirement for MDiv students, who must meet the SBCT requirement. Not for credit in the MA/NT or MA/OT programs. Elective credit in MDiv program. Auditors are not permitted in General Competency courses unless they have taken previous undergraduate coursework in the subject or are not intending to complete the MA program.

NT 5002 Introduction to the New Testament 2 - 2 Hours

Introductory survey of Romans through Revelation. This course meets the English Bible competency requirement for MDiv students, who must meet the SBCT requirement. Not for credit in the MA/NT or MA/OT programs. Elective credit in MDiv program. Auditors are not permitted in General Competency courses unless they have taken previous undergraduate coursework in the subject or are not intending to complete the MA program.

NT 5100 English Bible - 2 Hours

Demonstration of inductive Bible study method and treatment of the special teaching of a particular book or books of the New Testament based on the English text. May be repeated for credit as the book studied changes. Not for credit in the MA/NT or MA/OT programs.

NT 5131 Beginning Greek 1 - 2 Hours

Introduction to phonology, morphology, grammar of New Testament Greek, and vocabulary development. Designed for students with little or no background in beginning Greek. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity.

NT 5132 Beginning Greek 2 - 2 Hours

Further introductory study in phonology, morphology, grammar of New Testament Greek, and vocabulary development. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Prerequisite: NT 5131.

NT 5133 Beginning Greek 3 - 2 Hours

Final introductory study in phonology, morphology, grammar of New Testament Greek, and vocabulary development. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Prerequisite: NT 5132.

NT 5251 Greek Exegesis 1 - 2 Hours

Study in the use of Greek for the interpretation of the New Testament. Students review morphological paradigms, expand their Greek vocabulary, survey the theory and practice of lexical semantics, identify proper exegetical methodology, and understand intermediate Greek syntax and grammar. Special attention is given to the analysis of Colossians 1-2. Students are encouraged to register for the same section of NT 5251 and NT 5252 each semester. Prerequisite NT 5133 or a pass on Trinity?s Greek proficiency test (usually reflecting two years of undergraduate Greek).

NT 5252 Greek Exegesis 2 - 2 Hours

Further study in the use of Greek for the interpretation of the New Testament. Students review intermediate Greek grammar and syntax, survey the theory and practice of textual criticism, strengthen their Greek vocabulary, exegete 1 Peter 1-2, and develop phrasing diagrams of selected passages they exegete. Students are encouraged to register for the same section of NT 5251 and NT 5252 each semester. Prerequisite: NT 5251.

NT 5253 Exegesis for Preaching - 2 Hours

This course, taught by the NT and PT departments, develops skills for interpreting New Testament passages for sermon preparation. Students exegete passages from various New Testament genres, relate exegetical analysis to the larger biblical narrative, and develop exegetical outlines and summaries of the biblical texts they study. Prerequisites: NT 5001 and NT 5002, NT 5252, and HM 6200.

NT 6261 Interpreting the Synoptics - 2 Hours

A study of the Synoptics with emphasis on developing the skills necessary to be effective interpreters of these texts. Students evaluate various critical approaches to the Gospels and to the life of Christ, recognize the historical reliability of the Synoptics, analyze central theological themes, exegete selected Greek passages, and further refine the methodological skills they learned in NT 5251 and NT 5252. Prerequisites: NT 5001 and NT 5002 with a grade of C-or better, or passing the NT portion of the Standard Bible Content Test; and NT 5252.

NT 6262 Interpreting Pauline Epistles - 2 Hours

A study of the Pauline Epistles with emphasis on developing the skills necessary to be effective interpreters of these texts. Students examine the life, mission, and theology of the Apostle Paul, evaluate the individual letters in their relationship to apostolic history and the life of the church, analyze central theological themes, exegete selected Greek passages, and further refine the methodological skills they learned in NT 5251 and NT 5252. Prerequisites: NT 5001 and NT 5002 with a grade of C-or better, or passing the NT portion of the Standard Bible Content Test; and NT 5252.

NT 6263 Interpreting Acts and General Epistles - 2 Hours

A study of Acts and the General Epistles with emphasis on developing the skills necessary to be effective interpreters of these texts. Students examine the theology of Acts and the General Epistles, evaluate the individual books in their relationship to apostolic history and the life of the church, analyze central theological themes, exegete selected Greek passages, and further refine the methodological skills they learned in NT 5251 and NT 5252. Prerequisites: NT 5001 and NT 5002 with a grade of C-or better, or passing the NT portion of the Standard Bible Content Test; and NT 5252.

NT 6264 Interpreting Johannine Literature - 2 Hours

A study of the Johannine literature with emphasis on developing the skills necessary to be effective interpreters of these texts. Students evaluate the differences between the Fourth Gospel and the Synoptics, assess the different hermeneutical approaches to Revelation, analyze the theological contribution of each Johannine writing, exegete selected Greek passages, and further refine the methodological skills they learned in NT 5251 and NT 5252. Prerequisites: NT 5001 and NT 5002 with a grade of C-or better, or passing the NT portion of the Standard Bible Content Test; and NT 5252.

NT 7477 MA Major Comprehensive Exam - 0-1 Hours

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some MA programs. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

NT 7485 MA Thesis - 0-2 Hours

MA thesis writers register for NT 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

NT 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for NT 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter.CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

NT 7501 Guided Research - 1-2 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

NT 7600 Individual NT Book Study - 2-4 Hours

Examination of the structure and theology of a specific NT book (e.g., Matthew, 1-2 Corinthians, Romans, Hebrews), with special attention to exegesis of specific passages. The distinctive emphases of the book are considered: including (for example) the person and work of Christ, the history of interpretation, the use of the OT, etc., depending on the chosen book. Prerequisite: NT 5252.

NT 7695 Hermeneutics - 2-3 Hours

The science of biblical interpretation with examination and explanation of the various systems of such. Using selected passages of Scripture, the disciplines necessary in biblical interpretation come to be understood and developed.

NT 7720 Backgrounds Early Christianity - 2-3 Hours

Surveys the history and theology of the period from the close of the Old Testament canon in the fifth century B.C. to the time of Christ, with special emphasis on the literature (including an introduction to primary texts, both Jewish and Greco-Roman) and the social history of the early Roman Empire.

NT 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

NT 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

NT 7977 ThM Comprehensive Exam - 0-1 Hours

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some ThM concentrations. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

NT 7980 MA Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

MA participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for 7980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a MA capstone research paper (MA/NT or MA/BL). Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit/No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded C- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

NT 8000 Seminar: Current Issues - 2-4 Hours

Issues of importance in New Testament history, criticism, interpretation, and theology discussed in a seminar setting. Some seminars may have prerequisites; students should consult with the professor and view class details prior to enrolling.

NT 8210 Lukan Writings - 2-4 Hours

History and theology in the Gospel of Luke and the Book of Acts. Special attention is given to narrative structure. Passages are selected from both books for study in depth. Prerequisite: NT 6261, NT 6262, NT 6263 or NT 6264.

NT 8220 Revelation and Apocalyptic Literature - 2-4 Hours

This course seeks to study the Book of Revelation from four perspectives: antecedents (the meaning and use of 'apocalyptic' in the ancient world), models (Jewish and Hellenistic apocalyptic works), exegesis (the study of individual texts), and biblical theology (the study of themes in the Book of Revelation). Prerequisites: NT 6264 or concurrent enrollment.

NT 8430 History of NT Interpretation - 2-4 Hours

A survey of the history of criticism of the New Testament primarily from the late eighteenth century to the present. Particular emphasis on the development of critical methodologies, relationships between critical approaches and worldview, and evangelical responses to the key movements. Prerequisites: NT 6261, NT 6262, NT 6263, or NT 6264 or concurrent enrollment.

NT 8720 Advanced Greek Exegesis - 2-4 Hours

Intensive exegetical study of a selected book (usually Acts, 2 Corinthians, the Pastoral Epistles, or Hebrews) or series of texts, evaluating the methods and conclusions of representative commentaries in light of recent studies in grammar and textual criticism. Prerequisites: NT 6261, NT 6262, NT 6263, or NT 6264, or concurrent enrollment. May be repeated as the instructor varies.

NT 8721 Advanced Greek Grammar - 2-4 Hours

Studies in Greek grammar and syntax as they inform New Testament exegesis with special reference to standard grammars and contemporary linguistic discussion. Prerequisites: NT 5262 (with an A- or better); and NT 6261, NT 6222, NT 6263, or NT 6264, or concurrent enrollment. May be repeated as the instructor varies.

NT 8911 New Testament Research - 2 Hours

An introduction to the primary sources, the secondary literature, and the major issues related to doctoral level New Testament studies. Students will become familiar with the scholarly editions of Hebrew, Aramaic, Latin, and Greek texts of the Old and New Testament as well as of the contemporary literature of the Hellenistic and Greco-Roman period, and with the lexicons, dictionaries, encyclopedias, and commentaries which scholars use in order to translate and interpret these texts. The major issues and methods of New Testament research are introduced in a discussion of the Synoptic Gospels, the Gospel of John, the Book of Acts, Paul's Letters, the Catholic Epistles, and revelation, the history of New Testament research, the history of the early church in the first century, and the theology of the New Testament. Students are expected to read at least Hebrew and Greek, preferably also Aramaic and Latin, as well as French or German. Required course for entering students (does not count as a seminar).

NT 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for NT 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit/No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded "C-" or better to receive credit for the paper.)

NT 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-3 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for NT 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

NT 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for NT 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

NT 9001 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. Available in all PhD programs. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours in PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS programs; may be repeated for a maximum of six hours in the PhD/THS program. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

NT 9011 Private Study - 0 Hours

In special circumstances, a student may register for one or more semesters of Private Study in order to meet the requirements for candidacy. Only for PhD/THS students in CH, NT, OT, ST departments. Counts as full-time student status when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week (half-time is 15 hours per week) are invested in doctoral study and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. May be repeated four times. No Credit.

NT 9890 Professional Development Practicum - 0-2 Hours

Participants design, conduct, and evaluate at least one professional development activity. Program participants may repeat the course multiple times, not to exceed a total of 2 hours over the course of the degree program. These integrative and generative activities could take the form of teaching, consulting, developing curriculum, coaching, pastoral ministries, grant writing, etc. Participants may propose non-Trinity or Trinity-related activities and opportunities. Each student is responsible to initiate conversations toward PDP planning with their program director prior to the semester in which the practicum will be conducted. All activities must be conducted after program matriculation. One credit hour is equivalent to approximately 35-40 hours of invested practicum work. Credit/No Credit.

NT 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/THS program participants may repeat it once. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

NT 9990 Dissertation Proposal Prep - 1-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. PhD/THS program participants may repeat this course once for a total of 3 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

NT 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Courses taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

NT 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.

OT 5000 Introduction to the Old Testament - 4 Hours

An introduction to the literature of the Old Testament, the history of Israel, critical issues of Old Testament formation, method in Old Testament study, and the theology of the Old Testament. This course meets the OT General Comprehensive requirement for MA students and the English Bible competency requirement for MDiv students, who must meet the SBCT requirement. Not for credit in the MA/NT or MA/OT programs. Elective credit in MDiv program. Auditors are not permitted in General Comp courses unless they have taken previous undergraduate course work in the subject or are not intending to complete the MA program. Offered fall.

OT 5001 Introduction to the Old Testament 1 - 2 Hours

An introduction to the literature of the Old Testament, the history of Israel, critical issues of Old Testament formation, methods in Old Testament study, and the theology of the Old Testament. The course covers the books of Genesis through Esther. This course meets the OT General Comprehensive requirement for MA students and the English Bible competency requirement for MDiv students, who must meet the SBCT requirement. Not for credit in the MA/NT or MA/OT programs. Elective credit in MDiv program. Auditors are not permitted in General Competency courses unless they have taken previous undergraduate course work in the subject or are not intending to complete the MA program.

OT 5002 Introduction to the Old Testament 2 - 2 Hours

An introduction to the literature of the Old Testament, the history of Israel, critical issues of Old Testament formation, methods in Old Testament study, and the theology of the Old Testament. The course covers the books of Job through Malachi. This course meets the OT General Comprehensive requirement for MA students and the English Bible competency requirement for MDiv students, who must meet the SBCT requirement. Not for credit in the MA/NT or MA/OT programs. Elective credit in MDiv program. Auditors are not permitted in General Competency courses unless they have taken previous undergraduate course work in the subject or are not intending to complete the MA program.

OT 5050 Geography of Bible Lands - 2 Hours

Examination of the geography of Bible lands, including an analysis of the physical topography of natural regions and ancient sites, an assessment of political and territorial subdivisions, and a diachronic unfolding of those events that have transpired in the land that lend themselves to geographic explanation. The course will suggest and illustrate how some large blocks of biblical material, as well as several entire canonical books, can be significantly nuanced with historical and theological texture as a result of discerning the spatial dimensions embedded in the text.

OT 5075 Biblical Archaeology - 2 Hours

The relationship between archaeological data and the Old Testament is investigated with special interest in current problems in the field of biblical archaeology, such as the origins of Israel and the United Monarchy. The science of archaeology, fieldwork, and research methods are introduced.

OT 5100 English Bible - 2 Hours

Demonstration of inductive Bible study method and treatment of the special teaching of a particular book or books of the Old Testament based on the English text. May be repeated for credit as the book studied changes. Not for credit in the MA/NT or MA/OT programs.

OT 5131 Elementary Hebrew 1 - 2 Hours

Essentials of biblical Hebrew grammar with emphasis on morphology and phonology of nominal forms, as well as vocabulary. OT 5131, OT 5132, and OT 5133 are taught as a sequence. Students must register for the same section all three sessions. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity.

OT 5132 Elementary Hebrew 2 - 2 Hours

Further consideration of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary with a focus on the Hebrew verb. Designed to prepare the advancing Hebrew student for consideration of Hebrew syntax and the reading of selected texts. OT 5131, OT 5132, and OT 5133 are taught as a sequence. Students must register for the same section all three sessions. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Prerequisite: OT 5131 passed with a C- or better.

OT 5133 Elementary Hebrew 3 - 2 Hours

Continued study of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary with a focus on Hebrew syntax. Designed to prepare the advancing Hebrew student for exegetical study by more advanced consideration of Hebrew syntax and reading of selected texts. OT 5131, OT 5132, and OT 5122 are taught as a sequence. Students must register for the same section all three sessions. May not be audited unless already taken for credit at Trinity. Prerequisite: OT 5132 passed with a C- or better.

OT 5251 Hebrew Exegesis 1 - 2 Hours

Students learn how to use biblical Hebrew for exegetical study of Old Testament texts. Using the book of Jonah as a case study, attention is given to semantics, as well as syntax and structure. Students are equipped to move from observation and analysis to synthesis and exposition. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5133 passed with a C- or better.

OT 5252 Hebrew Exegesis 2 - 2 Hours

As a continuation of OT 5251 students learn how to use biblical Hebrew for exegetical study of the Old Testament by exploring selected texts. Attention is given to semantics, as well as syntax and structure. Students are equipped to move from observation and analysis to synthesis and exposition. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5251 passed with a C- or better.

OT 6000 Current Studies in Old Testament - 1-4 Hours

Topics selected deal with significant issues related to Old Testament studies. May be repeated for credit.

OT 6261 Interpreting the Pentateuch - 2 Hours

Building on OT 5251 and OT 5252, students develop exegetical competence in the Pentateuch (Genesis through Deuteronomy). Students apply learned exegetical methodology to various genres within these books. Working in selected narrative and legal texts, students examine key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues. May not be audited. Prerequisites: OT 5252, OT 5001, and OT 5002 with a grade of C- or better) or passing the OT portion of the Standard Bible Content Test.

OT 6262 Interpreting the Former Prophets - 2 Hours

Building on OT 5251 and OT 5252, students develop exegetical competence in the Former Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings). Students apply learned exegetical methodology to various genres within these books. Working in selected narrative and poetic texts, students examine key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues. May not be audited. Prerequisites: OT 5252, OT 5001, and OT 5002 with a grade of C- or better or passing the OT portion of the Standard Bible Content Test.

OT 6263 Interpreting the Latter Prophets - 2 Hours

Utilizing skills acquired in OT 5251 and OT 5252, students further develop exegetical competence in the Hebrew text of the Latter Prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, the Twelve, and Daniel). The course advances the student?s understanding of Hebrew poetry and its forms and techniques. Working in selected poetic and narrative texts, students examine key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues. Students apply learned exegetical methodology to various genres within these books. May not be audited. Prerequisites: OT 5252, OT 5001, and OT 5002 with a grade of C-or better or passing the OT portion of the Standard Bible Content Test.

OT 6264 Interpreting the Writings - 2 Hours

Culminating on the skills attained in OT 5251 and OT 5252, students cultivate increased exegetical competence in the Hebrew text of the poetic and wisdom books (Psalms, Job, Proverbs, Song of Songs, Ecclesiastes, Lamentations) and post-exilic narratives Ezra/Nehemiah, Esther, Chronicles). Advanced consideration of Hebrew poetry facilitates work in selected poetic and narrative texts. Students examine key structural, contextual, thematic, critical, and theological issues. Students apply learned exegetical methodology to various genres within these books. May not be audited. Prerequisites: OT 5251, OT 5252, OT 5001, and OT 5002 with a grade of C- or passing the OT portion of the Standard Bible Content Test.

OT 7477 MA Major Comprehensive Exam - 0-1 Hours

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some MA programs. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

OT 7485 MA Thesis - 0-2 Hours

MA thesis writers register for OT 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

OT 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for OT 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter.CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

OT 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

OT 7510 Hebrew Reading Skills - 2 Hours

Guided reading in selected passages to develop facility with Hebrew vocabulary and modes of expression, provide continued review of phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, and improve reading comprehension. May be repeated for credit. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5133.

OT 7513 Old Testament Theology - 2 Hours

A study of the approaches to the theology of the Old Testament in the last century in an effort to engage critically with recent proposals and develop skills for reading the Old Testament theologically.

OT 7514 Ancient Near Eastern Religions - 2 Hours

A comparative study of religions of the ancient Near East, with special treatment of Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Levantine, and Israelite traditions. Various religious studies methodologies are introduced and sources for studying Ancient Near Eastern religions are examined. Topics are studied comparatively with the Israelite traditions, such as cosmology, temples, priests, popular religion, and death/after-life.

OT 7515 History of Israel - 2 Hours

An investigation of the study of the history of Israel from the origins of the nation to the end of the period of the Hebrew Bible.

OT 7516 History of the Ancient Near East - 2 Hours

An orientation into the world of the ancient Near East which surveys the social, economic, and political history of that region with emphasis on its relation to the Old Testament. Integrated with this material are geography, archaeology, and the study of institutions as these contribute to an understanding of ancient Near Eastern history.

OT 7517 Dead Sea Scrolls and the Bible - 2 Hours

A study of select readings from the Dead Sea Scrolls in Hebrew alongside the archaeological finds from Qumran and first century Palestine. Particular attention is given to the contributions that this corpus makes to biblical studies, textual criticism, and the beliefs and practices of intertestamental and New Testament Judaism, as well a early Christianity. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 7610 Biblical Aramaic 1 - 2 Hours

Reading of the Aramaic portions of Daniel 2-7 and comparison of Aramaic phonology, morphology, and syntax with Hebrew. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 7611 Biblical Aramaic 2 - 2 Hours

Reading of the Aramaic portions of Ezra 4-7 and comparison of Aramaic phonology, morphology, and syntax with Hebrew. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5252, OT 7610.

OT 7614 Extrabiblical Aramaic - 2 Hours

Reading of Aramaic papyri and inscriptions from the first seven centuries of the first millennium B.C., as well as selected Aramaic Targums. Comparison of phonology, morphology, and syntax with biblical Aramaic. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 7620 Akkadian 1 - 2 Hours

Introduction to the Sumero-Akkadian cuneiform script of ancient Babylonia and Assyria and inductive study of the essentials of the grammar. Reading of selections from the Code of Hammurabi, the Epic of Gilgamesh, the Babylonian Creation Epic, and the Neo-Assyrian royal inscription, with comparisons to the Hebrew Bible. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 7621 Akkadian 2 - 2 Hours

Continuation of OT 7620. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 7620.

OT 7622 Akkadian 3 - 2 Hours

Continuation of OT 7621. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 7621.

OT 7630 Ugaritic 1 - 2 Hours

Guided reading in selected Ugaritic texts. Study of Ugaritic vocabulary, morphology, and syntax. Linguistic comparison of the language and texts with reference to points of contact with the Hebrew Bible. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 7631 Ugaritic 2 - 2 Hours

Guided reading in selected Ugaritic texts. Study of Ugaritic vocabulary, morphology, and syntax. Linguistic comparison of the language and texts with reference to points of contact with the Hebrew Bible. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5252 and OT 7630.

OT 7640 Syriac 1 - 2 Hours

Introduction to Syriac grammar with limited reading of the Peshitta text of the Old Testament. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 7641 Syriac 2 - 2 Hours

Continued study of Syriac grammar and reading of the Peshitta text of the Old Testament. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5252, OT 7640.

OT 7655 West Semitic Inscriptions - 2 Hours

A study of selected extra-biblical Hebrew, Moabite, Philistine, Ammonite, and Phoenician inscriptions according to their epigraphic contexts. Particular attention will be given to issues of genre, culture, religion, and history as related to the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 7680 Literature of the Ancient Near East - 2 Hours

A study of literature from the Ancient Near Eastern world with special emphasis on literature that is important for reading the Old Testament in its context. The course includes an informed reading in translation of selected texts in representative genres of literature from the various Ancient Near Eastern cultures. The student develops a methodology for sound comparison with the corresponding biblical genres.

OT 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

OT 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

OT 7977 ThM Comprehensive Exam - 0-1 Hours

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some ThM concentrations. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

OT 7980 MA Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

MA/BL participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for 7980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a MA capstone research paper (MA/BL). Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit/No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded C- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

OT 8000 Seminar: Current Issues - 2-3 Hours

Topics chosen deal with significant issues in Old Testament content, history, introduction, and/or interpretation, and seminar discussion and presentation of advanced research papers. May not be audited. Prerequisites determined by seminar topic.

OT 8210 Hebrew Exegesis: Genesis - 2-3 Hours

Consideration of the historical, historical-critical, interpretative, and theological issues in Genesis in the context of careful exegesis of selected passages. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 8230 Hebrew Exegesis: Psalms - 2-3 Hours

Overview of the Psalter's structure, major genres, themes, theology, and exegesis of representative psalms. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 8250 Hebrew Exegesis: Isaiah - 2-3 Hours

A textual-linguistic study of selected portions of the Hebrew text of Isaiah. May not be audited. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 8720 Hebrew Exegesis: Select Book - 2-3 Hours

Exegesis of selected texts with special attention to relevant theological issues. Attention to the book's structure, central themes, and historical, cultural, and literary contexts may also be included. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 8723 Old Testament Textual Criticism - 2-3 Hours

Introduction to the textual critical study of the Old Testament and its relationship to other areas of Old Testament study. Consideration is given to the goals and methodology of Old Testament textual criticism and the ancient versions as translations. Analysis of selected texts, comparing the readings of the Masoretic Text with selected ancient versions. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 8729 Advanced Hebrew Studies: - 2-3 Hours

Study of linguistic, methodological, and historical issues related to the Hebrew language. Course titles include Advanced Hebrew Syntax, Historical Hebrew Grammar, Hebrew Lexicography and Semantics, and Postbiblical Hebrew. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: OT 5252.

OT 8950 Old Testament Research and Methods - 2 Hours

The course provides an introduction to critical issues, secondary literature, and methods for advanced biblical and theological study of the Old Testament and its world. The course prepares students for the research and writing of a master's thesis or doctoral dissertation pertaining to Old Testament literature and history, as well as that of its Ancient Near Eastern milieu. Prerequisite: OT 5252. May not be audited.

OT 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for OT 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

OT 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-2 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for OT 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with the department.

OT 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for OT 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

OT 9001 Guided Research - 1-3 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. Available in all PhD programs. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours in PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS programs; may be repeated for a maximum of six hours in the PhD/THS program. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

OT 9011 Private Study - 0 Hours

In special circumstances, a student may register for one or more semesters of Private Study in order to meet the requirements for candidacy. Only for PhD/THS students in CH, NT, OT, ST departments. Counts as full-time student status when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week (half-time is 15 hours per week) are invested in doctoral study and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. May be repeated four times. No Credit.

OT 9890 Professional Development Practicum - 0-2 Hours

Participants design, conduct, and evaluate at least one professional development activity. Program participants may repeat the course multiple times, not to exceed a total of 2 hours over the course of the degree program. These integrative and generative activities could take the form of teaching, consulting, developing curriculum, coaching, pastoral ministries, grant writing, etc. Participants may propose non-Trinity or Trinity-related activities and opportunities. Each student is responsible to initiate conversations toward PDP planning with their program director prior to the semester in which the practicum will be conducted. All activities must be conducted after program matriculation. One credit hour is equivalent to approximately 35-40 hours of invested practicum work. Credit/No credit.

OT 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat the course twice for a total of three hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat it once. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

OT 9990 Dissertation Proposal Prep - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. Only PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat this course twice for a total of 3 hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat this course once for a total of 3 hours. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

OT 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Courses taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

OT 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.

PCS 106 Preparation for College Study - 3 Hours

This course is designed to prepare freshmen students to meet the challenges of college study. It provides an overview of the intellectual demands of college education, assists students in assessing their personal learning attributes and improving their practical academic skills, and introduces elements of critical analysis. Required for all Deerfield traditional undergraduate students whose ACT English score is 16 or less and whose SAT verbal score is 400 or less; Florida undergraduates will be placed in the program based on the advice of the Admissions Committee. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

PCS 107 Preparation for College Study,Nonnative - 3 Hours

This course is designed to prepare international students and nonnative speakers of English to meet the educational and cultural demands of the American college classroom. The course provides insight into cultural factors that underlie assumptions and knowledge, methods of instruction, interaction with instructors, and other areas that affect academic performance. Stress is placed on assisting students to produce academic work that conforms to American collegiate standards. This course is required for international students and students whose native language is not English. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

PCS 108 Critical Reading and Writing for College - 3 Hours

This course is designed to help students practice the critical skills in reading that are central to academic writing and discussion. The course provides students the opportunity to read, discuss, apply, integrate, and critique material from various academic disciplines, and offers instruction in committing their thoughts to writing. Required for entry into ENG 111 for all Deerfield traditional undergraduate students whose ACT English score is 18 or less or whose SAT verbal score is 410 or less. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate, and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

PCS 109 Reading and Writing Tutorial - 3 Hours

This course integrates the reading and writing processes in an intensive, small-group setting. Particular emphasis is placed on continuing the development of critical skills and planning and writing papers that respond to collegiate requirements. For Deerfield traditional undergraduate students, this course continues the work of PCS 106 or PCS 107; students enrolled in PCS 109 must be concurrently enrolled in ENG 111 immediately following the completion of PCS 106 or PCS 107 with a grade of C- or higher. Florida undergraduate students may take this course concurrently with ENG 111. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

PH 170 Logic - 3 Hours

A study of the principles of correct reasoning. This course will consider induction, deduction, informal fallacies, traditional logic, and symbolic logic.

PH 180 Introduction to Philosophy - 3 Hours

An introduction to philosophy that focuses on the principal issues in the theory of knowledge, metaphysics, ethics, and the construction of worldviews. Delivery mode: online, Florida undergraduate.

PH 182 Ethics - 3 Hours

An introduction to problems and concepts in ethical theory, plus a consideration of contemporary moral problems.

PH 290X Christian Apologetics - 3 Hours

Introduction to the major intellectual challenges facing Christianity, and examination of the means and methods Christians have used to address these challenges. Proofs for God's existence and a broad range of philosophical approaches for defending the Christian faith. Cross-listed with BRS 290X.

PH 363X Survey of Religious Diversity - 3 Hours

A survey of the world's major religions, including Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and other religious movements. The specific aim of the course is to learn how to understand and engage a full range of religious worldviews from the perspective of the Christian faith. Special attention is given to comparing and contrasting religious movements with the historic Christian faith. The course probes various dimensions of the problem of religious truth, explores the possibility of constructing a systematic understanding of religions, and seeks to formulate creative and thoughtful responses to the problem of religious diversity. Cross listed with BRS 363X. Delivery mode: online.

POL 250 American Government - 3 Hours

This course surveys the structure, function, and principles of federal, state, and local government. National and state constitutional principles are specifically considered. Special attention is also paid to the historical development of governmental institutions in America. Delivery mode: online, Florida undergraduate.

POL 255X Constitutional Law - 3 Hours

An examination of the American constitutional system with special emphasis given to the role of judicial institutions and the impact of Supreme Court decisions. Offered spring semester even years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Cross listed with CRJ 255X. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

POL 350 Topics in Political Science - 3 Hours

A seminar focusing on a selected topic in political science. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

POL 375 Topics in Law and Government - 3 Hours

A seminar focus on a selected topic such as church and state relations or the First Amendment and American democracy. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

POL 445 Internship - 2-4 Hours

Practical, supervised field experience in law, government, or public service. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

POL 450 Independent Study - 1-4 Hours

Research and specialized studies designed to meet the need of individual students. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PR 6000 Current Studies in Philosophy of Religion - 1-4 Hours

Topics selected deal with significant issues related to philosophy of religion.

PR 6410 History of Phil of Religion 1 - 2 Hours

This course covers ancient and medieval philosophy of religion and ends with discussion of the rationalists Descartes, Spinoza, and, Leibniz.

PR 6411 History of Phil of Religion 2 - 2 Hours

This course begins with study in the early modern period with the empiricists (Locke, Berkekey, and Hume) and continues with an examination of the contemporary period.

PR 7330 Philosophers of Religion and of Religious Significance - 2-3 Hours

In-depth consideration of the philosophy of an important religious thinker such as Augustine, Aquinas, Kierkegaard, Tillich, and Hartshorne, or of an important nonreligious thinker such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Leibniz, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Russell, or Wittgenstein, whose thought strongly influenced religious and theological issues. May be repeated for credit.

PR 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

PR 7705 Religious Epistemology - 2-3 Hours

Examination of the ways of knowing and tests for truth with special emphasis on the problems of religious knowledge and their implications for theological issues.

PR 7715 Theism - 2-3 Hours

Study in the existence and nature of God with emphasis on theistic arguments (ontological, cosmological, teleological, and moral) and on the internal coherence of such divine attributes as necessity, omnipotence, and omniscience.

PR 7750 Philosophical Issues in Religious Pluralism - 2-3 Hours

Consideration of the major epistemological and metaphysical issues for philosophy of religion arising from the discussions on religious diversity and religious pluralism. The views of influential philosophers such as John Hick, William Alston, Keith Ward, and others are examined, as well as responses to their work.

PR 8000 Seminar: Current Issues - 2-4 Hours

Analyses of selected issues in philosophy of religion and their implications for Christian thought. Examples include the following: questions concerning the concept of God, the nature and possibility of the miraculous, freedom and determinism, religion and science, phenomenology, and the historicity of the resurrection of Christ.

PS 101 Earth Science - 4 Hours

A basic course in concepts of astronomy, meteorology, and geology. Laboratory is included. A laboratory fee is required. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology - 3 Hours

A survey of the field of psychology: major orientations (neurobiological, behavioral, cognitive, psychoanalytic, and humanistic); historical developments; views of personhood; scientific procedures; and relevance to everyday life. Prerequisite for all 300- and 400-level psychology courses, with exceptions by permission of appropriate instructor, or online or Florida undergraduate advisor. Offered each semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online, Florida undergraduate, and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

PSY 141 Psychology Seminar - 1 Hour

This course is designed for students in psychology to develop their use of information technology and become familiar with psychological resources and report writing techniques. Students will also develop coping skills useful in their academic endeavors, as well as investigate the diverse career and educational paths for those graduating with an undergraduate degree in psychology. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

PSY 170X Leadership Dynamics - 3 Hours

This course will study the vital role and responsibilities of leaders within various organizations. Emphasis will be given to the study of a biblical concept of leadership, various leadership styles, spiritual gifts, personal development, leadership management, administration/delegation, change management, conflict management, and development of leadership staff. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Cross-listed with LR 170X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 210 Life Planning - 3 Hours

A personal investigation of the development tasks of young adulthood coupled with an exploration of vocational development. Emphasis is placed on personal application and growth. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 220 Interpersonal Skills Training - 3 Hours

A skills training approach to the development of interpersonal relationships. Students learn skills in expressing themselves, active listening, responding, supporting, and challenging in nonjudgmental ways through group experiences. Students have the opportunity to evaluate their interpersonal style, receive input from each other, and make changes in the way they interact with others. Prerequisites for Deerfield traditional undergraduate: Three credit hours in Psychology and at least sophomore standing. Offered each semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

PSY 230 Crisis Intervention - 3 Hours

A lecture/discussion seminar dealing with issues of people in crisis, crisis intervention, stress, and stress management. Emphasis will be on the practical aspect of helping people in distress. Prerequisite: Three credit hours in Psychology and at least sophomore standing. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida undergraduate, online.

PSY 240 Human Sexuality - 3 Hours

Interdisciplinary examination of the physiological, cultural, and psychological bases of human sexual behavior with attention devoted to the student's development of a personal perspective toward sexuality that integrates Christian faith and moral integrity. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

PSY 250 Contemporary Issues Psychology - 3 Hours

A seminar composed of student and faculty desiring to pursue a topic of mutual interest. Preference will be given to issues that are timely and that involve the relating of psychology to the needs of society or the resolution of conflicts within the field of psychology. May be repeated for credit. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 251 Topics in Counseling Psychology - 3 Hours

A seminar focusing on a selected topic specific to the area of counseling psychology. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 255 Psychology of Addiction - 3 Hours

A survey of various forms of addictive behavior (drug, alcohol, sex, gambling, food, relationship, and others). Numerous theoretical approaches to addiction and the addictive personality are considered. Individual, family, group (including Twelve Step programs), behavioral modification, and other possible treatment interventions are assessed. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online, Florida undergraduate, and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

PSY 260X Educational Psychology/Human Development - 3 Hours

A survey of the theories and philosophies of learning and human development in children and adolescents. Emphasis is placed on the cognitive processes associated with learning and the factors that influence motivation and engagement of children and adolescents. The learning and motivation of diverse populations is addressed through the lens of Universal Design for Learning. Prerequisite: ED 101 or three credit hours in psychology and at least sophomore standing. Cross-listed with ED 260X. This fulfills one (1) service learning requirement (equivalent to IDS 106) if the course is completed with a grade of C or higher and the required service hours are documented. Offered fall semester. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, Florida non-traditional undergraduate.

PSY 280X Introductory Statistics - 3 Hours

An examination of both descriptive and inferential statistics. Specific topics include the scientific method, data analysis and production, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression, random sampling and probability, nonparametric inferential tests, and parametric inferential tests including one-way analysis of variance. Credit obtained in this course does not fulfill the major requirements in psychology (for Deerfield traditional and Florida undergraduates) or business (for Deerfield traditional undergraduates) or the minor requirement in sociology. (Florida undergraduate business majors take PSY 280X as part of the major.) Offered each semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Computer fee. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate and Florida undergraduate.

PSY 282 Introduction to SPSS - 1 Hour

Examination of SPSS for Windows, including topics in statistical analysis and data management useful to social science majors. Not appropriate for students who have taken or are enrolled in PSY 285X. Offered each semester. Computer fee for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 285X Statistics - 4 Hours

An examination of both descriptive and inferential statistics. Specific topics include the scientific method, data analysis and production, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression, random sampling and probability, nonparametric inferential tests, and parametric inferential tests including one-way analysis of variance. Specific instruction and computer experience in the use of SPSS is provided. Offered each semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Computer fee. Cross-listed with MA 285X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online, and Florida undergraduate.

PSY 300 Personality Theories - 3 Hours

This course acquaints students with theories and theorists having the greatest impact on the understanding of human personality. Some theories covered will be those developed by Freud, Jung, Adler, Rogers, Erikson, and Allport. Personality assessment, current personality research, and philosophical approaches to theory-building will also be discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 140. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online, and Florida undergraduate.

PSY 305 Organizational Psychology - 3 Hours

Experientially based survey of the psychological principles that apply to social and organizational situations. Practicality is emphasized for those in supervisory, management, or leadership responsibilities in any setting (e.g., church, business, government). Prerequisite: PSY 140. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate and Florida undergraduate.

PSY 310 Abnormal Psychology - 3 Hours

A study of history, definitions, and issues related to abnormal behavior. Major emphasis is on behavioral, existential, and physiological approaches. Prerequisite: PSY 140. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online, and Florida undergraduate.

PSY 315 Life Assessment - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the development of self-understanding and preparation for the future. Issues of background, personality and temperament, learning style, identity, life experience and vocation will be examined. The role of autobiography as a means for self-assessment will be explored. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

PSY 320 Theories of Learning - 3 Hours

A study of the philosophy, history, methodology, theory, and research of learning and motivation. Applications of learning principles to a variety of contexts. Prerequisite: PSY 140. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online, and Florida undergraduate.

PSY 330 Developmental Psychology - 3 Hours

An interdisciplinary study of human development from childhood through adolescence. Physical, cognitive, and personality development will be examined. Prerequisite: PSY 140. Cannot be counted for credit in conjunction with PSY 337. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

PSY 335 Child Development - 3 Hours

A study of human development as the product of both maturational and environmental influences. Emphasis is on the theories and research findings that pertain to preadolescence. Biological and environmental factors regarding physical, perceptual, cognitive, social, moral, and emotional development will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 140. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 337 Psychology of Adolescence - 3 Hours

An interdisciplinary study of human development from puberty to early adulthood. Physical, cognitive, and personality development will be examined, both from the social and research point of view, while application will be encouraged for students who plan to work with adolescents. Special emphasis will be placed on the characteristics and needs of early adolescents and the role of professionals in the assessment, coordination, and referral of students to health/social service. Prerequisite: PSY 140; Education majors may substitute ED 260X/PSY 260X for PSY 140 as a prerequisite. Offered each semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online, and Florida undergraduate.

PSY 339 Adult Development - 3 Hours

A study of human development encompassing adolescence through old age. Physical, perceptual, cognitive, social, and emotional changes will be considered along with major issues and life decisions faced during adulthood. Prerequisite: PSY 140. Offered spring semester in even-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. (Not open to students with credit in PSY 336.) Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate and Florida undergraduate.

PSY 345 Internship I - 1-6 Hours

Provides the students with opportunities to apply various principles of psychology learned in previous coursework to actual settings with a chosen population at an agency or organization. Direct supervision is provided by onsite personnel, and overall progress is monitored by a faculty member. Normally a junior year experience. May be used as psychology elective hours. Satisfies the professional experience requirement for psychology majors. Offered in any semester or session for Deerfield traditional or online undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Online students register as traditional students.

PSY 346X Research Methods and Design - 3 Hours

This course introduces students to the uses and varieties of research methods in the social sciences. Students gain experience in designing and interpreting research and become sophisticated consumers of research by recognizing strengths and limiting liabilities of research methods. At the end of the course, students should feel comfortable reading and reviewing the research of others, and be capable of proposing and carrying out their own research projects. Majors are strongly encouraged to complete this course no later than their junior year. Prerequisites: PSY 140 and PSY 285X. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. (Not open to students with credit in PSY 340.) Delivery mode: Online and Florida undergraduate.

PSY 350X Social Psychology - 3 Hours

A study of the interrelationships between the individual and social groups. Topics include the formation of attitudes and attitude change, the nature of groups and group processes, and theoretical perspectives of social psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 140 or SOC 101. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Online.

PSY 355 Group Dynamics - 3 Hours

An interdisciplinary course in the social psychology of small groups, with emphasis on understanding and analyzing patterns of group interaction. A study of social forces that lead to group formation, leadership, decision making, problem solving, cohesion, and disintegration. Prerequisites: SOC 101 or PSY 140. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 356 Conflict Management - 3 Hours

This course surveys the dynamics of conflict from a variety of perspectives, emphasizing a Biblical understanding of interpersonal communication and conflict management. This course also addresses various theories of communication, verbal and nonverbal messages, and specific strategies to address conflicted situations, whether the conflict is interpersonal or organizational. Prerequisite: PSY 140. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online, and Florida undergraduate.

PSY 360X Introduction to Social Work - 3 Hours

A study of social casework principles, procedures and philosophy and welfare history and administration, related to a biblical view of humanity and the helping process. Prerequisite: PSY 140 or SOC 101. Offered fall semester in even-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 371 Dynamics of Group Behavior - 4 Hours

Students will examine small group behavior and how it affects organizational effectiveness. The structure and function of groups within various types of organizations, including businesses and churches will be considered. Group formation, teams, group roles, decision making, problem solving, conflict resolution, cohesion and disintegration are explored. Prerequisites: IDS 105, at least three credits in English composition, and at least sophomore standing. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

PSY 372 Cognitive Behavioral Psychology - 3 Hours

An exposure to the philosophy and methodology of psychology as a cognitive behavioral science. Methodological, radical, and contemporary cognitive behaviorism will be presented, with emphasis on social learning theory, cognitive psychology, self-efficacy theory, and the psychology of consciousness. Prerequisite: PSY 140. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; online as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

PSY 374 Physiological Psychology - 3 Hours

A study of the physiological bases of behavior. Topics include sensory coding, the control of movement, sexual development, hunger and thirst, vision and hearing, sleep, emotions, learning and memory, language, and mental disorders. The role of physical and psychological causes of behavior and their interaction are also considered. Prerequisite: PSY 140. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 375X Foundations of Christian Counseling - 3 Hours

Principles and techniques of counseling in ministry settings with a focus on counselor characteristics, problem-management skills, common counseling problems, multicultural dynamics, and various issues involved in the counseling process. Special emphasis is placed on the unique contribution of biblical truths to counseling. Cross-listed with CM 375X. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate, Wisconsin Prison Initiative, and Online.

PSY 378X Servant Leadership - 3 Hours

This course is designed to move the student from theory to practice as it relates to being a Servant Leader (SL). Emphasis will be given to the strategic and tactical aspects of Servant Leadership with a pervasive focus given to evidencing a SL ethic. Servant Leader domains covered include: valuing people, developing people, displaying oneself authentically, building community, providing and sharing leadership. Prerequisite: LR 170X or LR 173 & LR 174. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Cross listed with LR 378X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 381 Counseling Theories - 3 Hours

Introduction to both classical and current theories of counseling - evaluating them in light of Scripture, reason, and practical relevance. Prerequisite: PSY 140 and PSY 300. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

PSY 382 Crisis Counseling - 3 Hours

Introduction to the theory and practice of crisis intervention. Issues such as grief and trauma are explored from both professional and Christian perspectives. Prerequisite: PSY 140. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

PSY 383 Marital Counseling - 3 Hours

A survey of various theoretical and methodological approaches to marital counseling. A particular emphasis is given to assessment strategies, problem diagnosis, and intervention techniques. Prerequisite: PSY 140. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

PSY 384 Parent Education - 3 Hours

A survey of various theoretical and methodological approaches to educating parents in working with children from infancy through adolescence. A particular emphasis is given to understanding, relating to, disciplining, and encouraging children throughout their lives. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate and Wisconsin Prison Initiative.

PSY 400 Therapeutic Psychology - 3 Hours

This course familiarizes the student with the major theoretical approaches to counseling and psychotherapy and the various disciplines involved in psychological treatment. The therapy process is examined in terms of the role of the therapist and client, material frequently addressed in therapy, some of the techniques employed, psychotherapy research, and ethical issues related to counseling. The student will examine these topics as a prospective service-provider, as well as a potential consumer of psychological services. Prerequisite: PSY 300 or PSY 310. Offered spring semester in even-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online.

PSY 420X Advanced Interpersonal Skills Training - 3 Hours

An advanced course in interpersonal relationships that explores elements of group leadership. Students have an opportunity to train other students in relationship skills, to lead groups, and to receive supervision from the professor. Prerequisite: PSY 220, and invitation of the instructor.

PSY 430 Psychology of Religion - 3 Hours

An overview of the research into the psychology of religion as it relates to social, economic, political, and personal behavior. Provides a theoretical framework for assessing religion, for exploring the development and role of personal faith through the lifespan, and for understanding the social and organizational frameworks for religious and moral behavior. Prerequisite: a minimum of 9 hours of psychology coursework and junior or senior standing. Offered spring semester in even-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 440 Integration of Psychology and the Christian Faith - 3 Hours

A discussion seminar on foundational integrative methodologies regarding the discipline of psychology and Christian faith. Emphasis will be on practical applications to situations confronting the Christian today. Prerequisite: a minimum of 15 hours of psychology coursework. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate; other modes as scheduled. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate, online, and Florida undergraduate.

PSY 441 Psychology Senior Seminar - 1 Hour

Capstone course for the Psychology major (or the Social Science major for students focusing on courses in Psychology). This course prepares students for making the transition to vocation and/or graduate study, reviews the APA guides for ethics and publication form, assesses basic knowledge in the field of psychology and stabilizes the student's perspective on the integration of psychology and their Christian faith. Prerequisite: senior standing. This course fulfills the IDS 499X Integrative Thought Capstone requirement for students in the Psychology major. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Online students register as traditional students.

PSY 445 Internship II - 1-6 Hours

Provides the students with advanced opportunities to apply various principles of psychology learned in previous coursework or a previous internship experience to actual settings with a chosen population at an agency or organization. Direct supervision is provided by onsite personnel, and overall progress is monitored by a faculty member. Normally a senior year experience. May be used as psychology elective hours. May be repeated for credit, but total internship credit is limited to 12 hours. Satisfies the professional experience requirement for psychology majors. Offered in any semester or session for Deerfield traditional or online undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Online students register as traditional students.

PSY 450 Independent Study - 1-4 Hours

Research and specialized studies designed to meet the needs of individual students. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 460 Thesis - 3-6 Hours

Independent research designed and conducted under psychology faculty supervision and completed as a professional style paper. Prerequisite: PSY 340. Offered to individual students with senior standing on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Permission of department required. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PSY 470X Leadership Dynamics Practicum - 1-6 Hours

An advanced application course in leadership dynamics. Students will integrate leadership theory with experience in a practical setting, either on or off campus. Program specifics should allow students to practice all areas of leadership, including planning, implementation, and supervision. Practical experiences must be approved by the chair of either the Business or Psychology department. Enrollment is contingent upon completion of the College's internship contract, including the stipulation of course requirements. May be repeated for up to twelve total hours of credit. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and enrollment in an academic leadership program: the OL emphases, minors in either leadership or the practical leadership endorsement. Cross-listed with LR 470X. Offered each semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

PT 5090 Field Education - 0 Hours

Field-based ministry experience is vital to the development of Trinity students. Field education experiences are an opportunity to integrate academic work with practical ministry experience. All field education experiences are mentored experiences. Mentoring provides an opportunity to invest in the next generation of Christian leaders and ministries are enriched by having a student serve in a church or parachurch setting. Students are required to complete 40-45 hours of service (3-5 hours per week of ministry for a thirteen-week semester) for each Field Education course. Contact the Office of Supervised Ministry for orientation materials and details on fulfillment requirements. Field Education may be taken as an elective in any master's program by students who want to reflect on the pastoral implications of their academic work. Repeatable indefinitely. Credit/No Credit.

PT 5100 Spiritual Formation for Ministry - 2 Hours

The most critical item you can bring to Christian leadership is your own spiritual maturity. You cannot effectively lead others into what you have not first experienced for yourself. For fruitful Christian service, it is vital to know God and how to walk with Him. This course helps students to understand and apply a biblical and theological understanding of how one grows in the knowledge and grace of God through Jesus Christ. Specifically, students: 1) Understand and engage in a biblical theology of spiritual formation, 2) Apprehend the importance of utilizing the ?means of grace? for growth in godliness, 3) Integrate the theoretical with the practical to enrich one?s personal and devotional life, 4) Explore a wide array of Scriptural practices that have proven useful toward spiritual maturity, and 5) Develop a Personal and Professional Development Plan.

PT 5155 Church Planting Boot Camp - 2 Hours

Church Planting Bootcamp provides an introduction to the major start-up issues the planter faces. The objective is to provide a theological foundation and practical ministry skills that will enable the planter to start healthy, growing, reproducing churches. Four stages of church planting: preparation, conception, development, and birth stage are explored. Offered each May.

PT 6000 Current Studies in Pastoral Theology - 1-3 Hours

Topics selected deal with significant issues related to pastoral theology.

PT 6280 Christian Worship - 2 Hours

An introduction to Christian worship particularly in the liturgical leadership of the church. This course gives attention to the theology and history of Christian worship. It also examines the interplay between worship and culture, worship styles, and corporate worship planning. The course 1) equips students with a biblical theology and historical understanding of Christian worship and 2) develops skills in planning and leading Christian worship services that are God-honoring, biblically faithful, and contextually engaging.

PT 6300 Introduction to Chaplain Ministries - 2 Hours

The course will assist participants in exploring and evaluating various chaplaincy options as full or part-time ministry vocations. Though primary emphasis will be given to military and institutional chaplaincies (hospital, hospice, prison, etc.), other options will also be discussed including corporate, law enforcement, National Park, university, and Civil Air Patrol.

PT 6500 Money and Ministry - 2 Hours

This course helps students, ministry staff and pastors grow in sensitivity and knowledge about how to navigate financial challenges common in a variety of ministry settings. The course is designed to be flexible and developmental in nature, since each participant will come to the course with varying levels of financial knowledge, experience, and competency. The goal is to build upon the different foundations each participant will be bringing to the course, and tailor assignments in a variety of ways to help each participant grow in understanding and wisdom.

PT 7225 The Essence of Biblical Leadership - 2 Hours

In recent years the issue of leadership has occupied a great deal of our thinking and attention. There is no shortage of resources and seminars on the subject. To be sure, there needs to be the infusion of fresh, godly, biblical leadership who are filled with the compassion of Christ and who are committed to advancing His Cause. But what is distinctively Christian leadership? What does the Bible teach about leadership? What is the relationship between leadership and our effectiveness in ministry? These and other questions will be addressed in the course.

PT 7290 Pastoral Practices - 2 Hours

An introduction to the practices of pastoral ministry particularly in the shepherding care of the church. This course includes attention to the theology of spiritual care and the practical outworking of pastoral work including but not limited to conducting weddings and funerals, administering the Lord?s Supper and baptism, and offering spiritual consolation in the care of souls. The course 1) develops competency in engaging in select pastoral practices within the church and 2) increases pastoral aptitude in caring for the spiritual needs of people.

PT 7410 Denominational History & Polity - 2 Hours

Designed for students seeking a greater understanding of, or anticipating possible placement within, a particular Christian denomination. Attention paid to history, polity, doctrine, missionary outreach, and current trends. This is an independent study course, enabling the student to work with a pastor/ administrator from, and study the history and polity of, a denomination other than the EFCA. To register for this course, the student must contact the professor of record to receive clearance. Before registering, the student must select a denominational representative, and the representative must be approved by the professor of record according to TEDS standards for supervision.

PT 7415 Evangelical Free Church History and Polity - 2 Hours

Designed for students seeking a greater understanding of the EFCA or anticipating possible placement within the denomination. Attention paid to history, polity, doctrine, missionary outreach, and current trends. Students are challenged to consider these distinctives in relation to their own concepts of ministry context and potential.

PT 7481 Internship 1 - 2-3 Hours

This course is the first internship experience for MDiv students. The internship program is designed to foster the formation of ministerial identity through a blend of guided ministry experiences, mentoring from qualified practitioners, reflective assignments, and an Internship Huddle. Interns are supervised in a ministry context by qualified mentors approved by the Office of Supervised Ministries. Students are required to complete 100 hours of field experience per credit hour. Students enrolled in 2 or more hours during any semester of Internship are granted half-time academic status. Students enrolled in 3 or more credit hours during any semester of internship are granted full-time academic status. Prerequisite: approval from the Director of Supervised Ministries.

PT 7482 Internship 2 - 2-3 Hours

This course is the second internship experience for MDiv students. It provides an expansion of the student's ministry experience, mentoring from qualified practitioners, reflective assignments, and an Internship Huddle. Students are required to complete 100 hours of field experience per credit hour. This course requires a continuation of the same ministry site and mentor as PT 7481 unless granted an exception by the Director of Supervised Ministries. Students enrolled in 2 hours during any semester of internship are granted half-time academic status. Students enrolled in 3 or more credit hours during any semester of internship are granted full-time academic status. Prerequisite: PT 7481.

PT 7483 Internship 3 - 1-2 Hours

This course is the third internship experience for MDiv students under the previous catalog. It provides an expansion of the student's ministry experience, mentoring from qualified practitioners, and reflective assignments. Students are required to complete 100 hours of field experience per credit hour. This course requires a continuation of the same ministry site and mentor as PT 7481 and PT 7482 unless granted an exception by the Director of Supervised Ministries. Students enrolled in 2 or more hours during any semester of internship are granted half-time academics status. Prerequisites: PT 7481, PT 7482.

PT 7484 Intensive Internship - 4-6 Hours

This course is for MDiv students fulfilling their entire internship requirements in one semester. This internship option is typically reserved for students who are in a full-time ministry setting (30-45 hours per week). The internship program fosters the formation of ministerial identity through a blend of guided ministry experiences, mentoring from qualified practitioners, reflective assignments, and an Internship Huddle. Interns are supervised in a ministry context by qualified mentors approved by the Office of Supervised Ministries. Students are required to complete 100 hours of field experience per credit hour. Students enrolled in 3 or more credit hours during any semester of internship are granted full-time academic status. Prerequisites: approval from the Director of Supervised Ministries.

PT 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

PT 7977 ThM Comprehensive Exam - 1 Hour

A department-specific major comprehensive exam required in some ThM concentrations. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the exam is passed; No Credit if the exam is failed or not completed.

PT 8000 Current Issues - 2 Hours

Seminar discussion and advanced individual research on significant issues in pastoral theology.

PT 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for PT 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology - 3 Hours

A study of the basic structures of human society including social forces that hold groups together or pull them apart. Social institutions such as family, education, religion, and political economic systems are examined using sociological tools of analysis. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

SOC 221 Marriage and the Family - 3 Hours

Marriage and the family in historic and contemporary society, including the changes in family structure, function, and roles. The problems of dating, courtship, and marriage in modern American society are presented and related to biblical principles. Delivery mode: online and Florida undergraduate.

SOC 222 Social Problems - 3 Hours

A study of the principles of social disorganization and the application of these principles to an analysis of selected social problems. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

SOC 232 Social Movements - 3 Hours

This course focuses on theoretical domains in the sociological study of social movements and general social processes rather than on specific movements. Substantive work on specific movements is used to explain issues such as mobilization, tactics, and ideology, as well as how the social context in which a movement takes place matters. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate, online.

SOC 330 Race and Ethnic Relations - 3 Hours

This course provides a sociological perspective on intergroup relations between different ethnic groups. Cultural-based differences regarding communication styles, lifestyles, and ideology are explored, as well as the mechanisms of discrimination as they influence power structures inhibiting equality. The history and current experiences of some of the ethnic groups represented in the United States are examined. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

SOC 335 Urban Sociology - 3 Hours

An examination of the urbanization process, the dynamics of the urban "explosion" and its implications worldwide. Particular attention is given to subcultural groupings and to the social and subcultural interactions that characterize the urban experience. The inherent problems of urban growth and the enactment of urban policies designed to address those problems are also considered. Students are given first-hand exposure to the urban environment. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission by online or Florida undergraduate advisor. Delivery mode: Florida undergraduate.

SP 121 Elementary Spanish - 4 Hours

Pronunciation, conversation, reading, and grammar. Collateral reading with reports during the second semester. As far as possible, the course is conducted in Spanish. Credit for both semesters is required in order to apply to general education foreign language competency. Delivery mode: online.

SP 122 Elementary Spanish - 4 Hours

Pronunciation, conversation, reading, and grammar. Collateral reading with reports during the second semester. As far as possible, the course is conducted in Spanish. Credit for both semesters is required in order to apply to general education foreign language competency. Delivery mode: online.

ST 5201 Theology I: The God of the Gospel - 3 Hours

This course establishes the foundations for systematic theology, reflecting upon the triune God and the God-world relation. It introduces theological methodology and treats the doctrines of general and special revelation, particularly that of Holy Scripture. The course also engages theology proper (the divine perfections and personal attributes of the Holy Trinity) and the works of God in creating and providentially caring for the cosmos, including humans.

ST 5202 Theology II: The Gospel of God - 3 Hours

This course focuses on the gospel, the economy of salvation, the incarnation of the Son, and the Holy Spirit. The course begins by treating the human condition as now fallen, and sin as the backdrop of the gospel. Attention then turns to the work of Christ, particularly the atonement and accomplishment of redemption as the content of the gospel. The course then considers the application and consummation of redemption by examining the work of the Holy Spirit, the nature, mission, and destiny of the church as the gathered people of God as the climax of the gospel. The course concludes with a consideration of how the gospel story ends, for believers and unbelievers in the glory of God's being all in all in the new heaven and the new earth. Prerequisite: ST 5201.

ST 5211 Theology 1: The God of the Gospel: From the Father - 2 Hours

This course is the first of a three-course sequence that covers the fundamental doctrines of biblical Christianity, following the tripartite structure of the Apostles? Creed. It begins by introducing systematic theology as a spiritual and intellectual discipline for knowing God, evaluating Christian life and thought, and living well with others to God?s glory. It next examines the nature, sources, norms, and method of theology. This is followed by a study of how God makes himself known through general and special revelation, with special attention to the doctrine of Scripture, including the notions of inspiration and inerrancy. The high point of the course is the doctrine of God or theology proper, which includes both God in himself (the divine perfections and persons of the Trinity) and God in relation to the world (the works of creation and providence).

ST 5212 Theology 2: The God of the Gospel: Through the Son - 2 Hours

This course is the second of a three-course sequence that covers the fundamental doctrines of biblical Christianity, following the tripartite structure of the Apostles? Creed. The course covers a wide span of theological doctrine with specific attention to Christology. It begins with the creation of human creatures who bear the unique image of God, and finds its focal point in the person, life, and work of the perfect Image of God?Jesus, in whom the fullness of deity dwells bodily. The course examines topics related to theological anthropology, the fall of human creatures and the creation?s participation in this fall, the incarnation of Christ, the atonement of Christ, and the reconciliation of fallen human creatures to God through the Son.

ST 5213 Theology 3: The God of the Gospel: In the Holy Spirit - 2 Hours

This course is the third of a three-course sequence that covers the fundamental doctrines of biblical Christianity, following the tripartite structure of the Apostles? Creed. The course begins, in a sense, at Pentecost. Specific attention is given to the application of Christ?s reconciling work to the people of God through the Spirit of God, uniting fallen human creatures to God, one another, and the whole of creation. The person, life, and work of the Holy Spirit in and through the people of God both individually and corporately as the Church is examined with a focus on the sanctification of believers and their union with God. The course concludes with an investigation into the return of Christ, the righteous reign and judgment of Christ, and the full redemption of all things in Christ.

ST 5600 The Christian Life and Contemporary Challenges - 2 Hours

This course is the first part of a pair of courses, along with ST 7210. It serves as an introduction to the contemporary challenges associated with Christian belief and life. Usually associated with apologetics, it will begin with a series of investigations regarding why individuals are currently leaving churches and what a proper diagnosis of this reality looks like. It then proceeds to paint a picture of the Christian life as one of rightly ordered loves, claiming that such a promise of life is precisely what meets the needs of those departing churches. It concludes by arguing for the need for better evangelical moral theology, leading into its partner course, ST 7200.

ST 7200 Christian Ethics - 2 Hours

How can we faithfully take what we confess to be true as Christians and have it help make sense of the world we encounter before us? This course is an introduction to Christian ethics, and it takes up the challenges set forward by its partner course, ST 5600. After reviewing a vision of the Christian moral life as one of rightly ordered loves, the course proceeds to dive each week into an issue of moral complexity encountered in the world we occupy, issues that are of immediate relevance to ministerial practice. These issues will rotate of necessity, but include topics like justice, politics, war, economics, disability, gender, and race. Its goal is to help students to find creative, flexible, and faithful ways to live in the space between the way the world is and the way it ought to be, while recognizing that they are creatures driven by their loves, which is precisely how God intends for them to live the moral life.

ST 7477 MA Major Comprehensive Exam - 0-1 Hours

A department-specific Major Comprehensive Exam required in some MA programs. Registration should be completed at the beginning of the semester for the regularly scheduled exam date later that semester. Credit is posted when the Exam is passed; No Credit if the Exam is failed or not completed.

ST 7485 MA Thesis - 0-2 Hours

MA thesis writers register for ST 7485 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit/No Credit as arranged with the department. No grade is posted for this course until the thesis is completed and approved.

ST 7486 MA Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for ST 7485 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status (35 hours of academic work per week.) for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. CR is posted when substantive thesis progress is made, NC when inadequate progress is made.

ST 7501 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Independent research on an approved selected topic under a faculty member in the department bearing the course prefix. May be repeated for credit as the subject matter changes. Available in all departments. Letter grade or Credit/No Credit as arranged with faculty member.

ST 7504 Theological Method - 2 Hours

This course surveys and evaluates ways of doing theology, ancient and contemporary, evangelical and non-evangelical, with an aim to equipping students to do theology in academic, ecclesial, and missional settings. Special attention will be given to the sources and norms, various contexts, and ideas of "system" that inform and govern the development of doctrine in systematic theology. The overarching goal is to help students answer both the how and the why questions: the how, by forming their own convictions about how best to seek theological understanding; the why by forming habits of wise theological judgment about everything relating to God and the gospel.

ST 7505 Use of Scripture and Theology - 2 Hours

This course examines the manifold ways in which theologians, ancient and modern, evangelical and non-evangelical, Western and non-Western, view and especially use Scripture to formulate theological proposals, with regard both to Christian doctrine and practice. The course compares prominent schools of interpretation within the broader theological landscape and constructively suggests ways to extend the logic of Scriptural teaching into contemporary contexts. The twin questions, 'What does it mean to be biblical?' and 'How ought biblical authority actually work?' are addressed by developing an account of how the ancient biblical writings that comprise Scripture (divine discourse) generate and govern contemporary theological understanding and practice. Several case studies are employed to help students learn how to move from biblical exegesis to systematic theological reflection, and thus to become self consciously evangelical theologians who know how rightly to handle the word of truth.

ST 7695 Hermeneutics - 2-3 Hours

The science of biblical interpretation with examination and explanation of the various systems of such. Using selected passages of Scripture, the disciplines necessary in biblical interpretation come to be understood and developed.

ST 7715 Political Theology - 2 Hours

Political engagement and theological depth often appear to stand in an inverse relationship these days; as one increases, the other decreases. The impression created, therefore, is that politics and theology stand in a necessarily unhealthy relationship, such that the presence of one is detrimental to the other. Of course, it takes little convincing that the present cultural landscape in North American evangelical Christianity bears evidence of this unhealthy relationship. So, what?s a Christian to do, especially if she is serious about seeing all things in light of the gospel, including politics? This course explores the nature of our common life together, from a biblical, historical and systematic theological perspective. Ultimately, it investigates the theologically-relevant dimensions of how people negotiate common goods like government in ways that are both consistent and inconsistent with their discipleship. What?s Jerusalem got to do with Washington, D.C.? Should they have anything to do with one another? These are the questions for exploration before us.

ST 7911 Colloquium in Systematic Theology - 1 Hour

Integrative seminar for all students majoring in theology on various topics of contemporary concern. May be repeated. Credit / No Credit.

ST 7975 MA/ThM Comp Exam Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Major Comprehensive Exam and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only two semesters during which student must complete Comprehensive Exams or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status. Contact the Records Office for registration.

ST 7976 MA or ThM Thesis Proposal Prep - 0 Hours

An optional registration status for students preparing for their Thesis Proposal and who are not taking other courses during the semester of preparation. (May not be taken when another course is taken.) This registration ensures continuity in your TEDS program and defers continuation fees. Available for only one semester during which students must complete their Proposal or their academic status in the program will be jeopardized. Counts as quarter-time academic status.

ST 7980 MA Major Research Paper - 0-2 Hours

MA participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for ST 7980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a MA capstone research paper (MA/PR). Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded C- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

ST 8000 Seminar: Current Issues in Theology - 2-4 Hours

Lectures or seminar in a distinctive area of biblical or systematic theology; topics chosen in relation to the special competence of resident and visiting faculty, as well as current interests and needs. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8030 The Problem of Evil - 2 Hours

An examination of one of the traditional problems for Christian theism. After initially clarifying the nature of this attack against theism, discussion turns to different defenses and theodicies offered in response to this problem. Treatment covers the problem in both its logical and evidential forms. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8100 Essentials of Reformed Theology - 2 Hours

This course delves into a particular theological tradition rather than a single doctrine ? the Reformed. A single guiding question generates and governs the course contents and its conversation partners: ?What makes Reformed theology distinctly Reformed?? We approach this overarching question, much as one would a summit, by exploring various paths of ascent: textual, contextual, historical, hermeneutical, doctrinal, conceptual, ideological, confessional, and comparative. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8102 Analytic Theology - 2 Hours

This course provides an overview of one of the most important recent developments in theology, namely, analytic theology. This is an approach to theology that borrows ideas, concepts, and methods from analytic philosophy. The course begins with an introduction to the history and nature of analytic theology and then examines core Christian doctrines as they have been recently discussed by analytic theologians. This course is intended to provide students with the resources for developing their own evaluation of the fruit of analytic theology as it pertains to Christian faith, practice, and ministry. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8200 Seminar: Current Issues in Theology - 2 Hours

Lectures or seminar in a distinctive area of biblical or systematic theology with special relevance to pastoral ministry; topics chosen in relation to the special competence of resident and visiting faculty,as well as current interests and needs. Unlike ST 8000, this course can be used to fulfill the 3rd required class in ST for the MDiv curriculum. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8210 Divine Action and the Doctrine of Providence - 2 Hours

This course surveys the history of the doctrine of divine providence and identifies key issues before attempting a dogmatic account. Special attention is given to the concept of divine action, especially with reference to science and metaphysics. The concern is to articulate, in accordance with Scripture, what we may hope. The central focus is God's care for individuals, church, and cosmos. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8211 God in Biblical Theology and Systematic Theology - 2 Hours

This course on the doctrine of God has four interrelated aims: (1) to become acquainted with classical and contemporary approaches to Christian theism and assess their faithfulness to Scripture, (2) to examine current approaches to the relationship of biblical and systematic theology, (3) to learn to identify and interpret figurative language used to speak of God (e.g., metaphors, analogies, anthropomorphisms), and (4) to bring all of the above to bear on the question of divine impassibility. The course thus focuses on how we move from biblical to theological language to speak of God and formulate a doctrine of God and the nature of His relation to the world, with special attention to the issue of divine suffering. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8212 The Doctrine of the Trinity: Classical Formulations and Contemporary Issues - 2 Hours

A study in the biblical sources, classic formulations, and theological issues that are important in the doctrine of the Trinity. Classical formulations, in ecumenical creeds as well as major patristic, medieval, and early modern (Protestant scholastic) theologians, are studied within their historical contexts, and important movements in modern and contemporary theology are studied against the backdrop of these historic statements. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8213 Models of Sanctification - 2 Hours

A course involving a biblical and theological investigation of several models of sanctification held within Christian movements and denominations. Emphasizes understanding of each model, as well as encouraging students to develop their own biblically based model capable of implementation within a ministry context. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8214 Justification - 2 Hours

This course considers the biblical and theological foundations of the doctrine of justification. It explores these foundational elements incorporating a historical perspective. Influential thinkers are studied in the flow of important eras in the Church ranging from the time of Augustine to contemporary discussions. Recent conversations between members of the Protestant camp and Roman Catholics on justification, as well as on the New Perspective, are engaged. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8215 Pneumatology - 2 Hours

A study of the person and work of the Holy Spirit, including a defense of His deity and personality, His work in the Old Testament, the life of Christ, and the New Testament era, as well as discussion of contemporary issues related to this doctrine, such as tongues, divine healing, and prophecy. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8220 Christology: Classical Formulations and Contemporary Issues - 2 Hours

A study in the biblical sources, classic formulations, and theological issues that are important in the doctrine of Christ. Classical formulations, in ecumenical creeds as well as major patristic, medieval, and early modern (Protestant scholastic) theologians, are studied within their historical contexts, and important movements in modern and contemporary theology are studied against the backdrop of these historic statements. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8221 The Doctrine of the Atonement: Classical Formulations and Contemporary Issues - 2 Hours

A study in the doctrine of the atonement in light of its biblical foundations, classical elaborations, and contemporary appropriations. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8222 Theologies of the Sacraments/Ordinances - 2 Hours

This course introduces a theological approach to a variety of church practices that sometimes fall under the heading of sacraments or ordinances. Central to this course is an examination of the biblical and theological underpinning to such practices as Baptism and the Eucharist. This course also introduces theological resources for addressing additional doctrinal issues touching such topics as ordination, marriage, preaching, and death. Moreover, students will work toward bridge-building from the conceptual theological discussion of these issues to the practical manifestation of these practices in the life of the church. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8224 Theological Investigation in Human Identity: Gender - 2 Hours

What is gender? This is a question that is easy to ask, but quite difficult to answer. Some want to say what gender ought to be, usually in the form of context-free norms and prescriptions. Others want to say what gender is, usually in a descriptive mode. On their own, these tasks are limited, but taken together, and handled properly, they can generate a fruitful theology of gender. Is gender a matter of social norms or embodied realities? What difference does a Christian analysis make? Can we find gender in the Bible, or in the early Church? And what we are to do with the ordinary gendered experiences all of us have? Christians must have robustly theological answers to such questions, aware both of their descriptive tasks and of their normative commitments. This class provides opportunity and guidance for working through these issues, equipping students to arrive at their own answers, hopefully in the guidance of the Holy Spirit and through Holy Scripture. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8225 Theological Investigation in Human Identity: Race - 2 Hours

Race is a fraught issue for evangelicals. It serves to divide one ?type? of church from another, one ?type? of Christian from another, one ?type? of theology from another. It has therefore taken the role of a theological proxy, providing a criterion for who is ?in? and who is ?out.? This state of affairs is as lamentable as it is insufficiently theological, and the aim of this course is to chart a path away from it to a more salutary way to frame matters. The ambition is neither to mute the extra-theological considerations nor to turn down the explicitly theological concerns; keeping both in hand, we explore contemporary approaches to race, the history of the discussion, how Christians have looked to Scripture for help in both helpful and unhelpful ways, and the current state of the discussion. By the end, students are equipped with tools and ways of thinking that guide them in their ecclesial and ministerial callings. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8310 Theology of Augustine - 2 Hours

Augustine stands as a foundational thinker in Roman Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox traditions. He was a critical thinker at a critical time in the life of the Church. This course will consider the life and times of Augustine as informing elements in his theological development. Some of his best known works will be read and discussed to identify particular theological stances. These stances were also affected by what he saw as specific challenges to biblical faith arising from movements, such as Manichaeism, Donatism, and Pelagianism. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8360 Karl Barth - 2 Hours

A critical analysis of the origins, developments, and major contours of Barth's theology from his earliest writings to his later Church Dogmatics through a study of selected primary texts. Special attention is given to Barth's theological method, hermeneutics, and doctrine of the Word of God, as well as to other central theological topics (e.g., election, providence, the relation of dogmatics to ethics). Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8410 Theology in Contemporary Literature - 2 Hours

Works by authors such as Melville, Dostoevsky, Conrad, Shaw, Beckett, Updike, Lewis, Tolkien, Eliot, Auden, Williams, Fry, Buder, Joyce, Camus, Kafka, Faulkner, Salinger, and MacDonald are read and analyzed, and their theological perspective and implications are discussed. Prerequisites: ST 5211, ST 5212, and ST 5213.

ST 8980 ThM Major Research Paper - 0-1 Hours

ThM participants completing the two capstone research paper option must register for - 8980 in their department concurrent with registration for the advanced elective course in which they are writing a ThM capstone research paper. Paper parameters are found in the Academic Handbook and paper objectives are specifically articulated in consultation with the faculty member on the online Capstone Proposal Form. Registration occurs twice at the same time as registration for the course, once for each paper. Credit / No Credit. (Both the course and the paper must be graded 'C'- or better to receive credit for the paper.)

ST 8985 ThM Thesis - 0-2 Hours

ThM thesis writers register for ST 8985 in the department of their concentration. Prerequisite: Approved thesis proposal on file in the Dean's Office and other department-specific prerequisites. Counts as full-time academic status. (35 hours of academic work per week.) Letter grade or Credit/No Credit as arranged with the department.

ST 8986 ThM Thesis Extension - 0 Hours

A total of three semesters extension for ST 8986 may be granted when progress is being made on the thesis. Extension fee when not enrolled in other courses. Counts as full-time academic status for the first semester, quarter time thereafter. No Credit.

ST 9001 Guided Research - 1-4 Hours

Selected topics usually extended from foundational studies in seminars or courses. Available in all PhD programs. May be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours in PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS programs; may be repeated for a maximum of six hours in the PhD/THS program. Letter grade or Credit / No Credit.

ST 9011 Private Study - 0 Hours

In special circumstances, a student may register for one or more semesters of Private Study in order to meet the requirements for candidacy. Only for PhD/THS students in CH, NT, OT, ST departments. Counts as full-time student status when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week (half-time is 15 hours per week) are invested in doctoral study and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. May be repeated four times. No Credit.

ST 9100 Advanced Theological Prolegomena - 3-4 Hours

A course designed to explore the integrative character of Christian theology, focusing the contributions of the separate theological disciplines on the constructive and creative task of Systematic Theology. Students are encouraged to develop an approach that is integrative, orthodox, and creative, through the critical assessment of the theological proposals of evangelical and non evangelical theologians. To be taken concurrently ST 9110. Offered fall.

ST 9110 The Theological Scholar - 2 Hours

An orientation to doctoral-level scholarship (the development of an argument, research philosophy and methodology, good writing skills, dissertation preparation), to program specifics, and to the doctoral community life and ethos. It will also include papers presented by four professors, one from each of the THS departments, to illustrate and generate discussion about "theological integration." Must be taken in conjunction with DST 9100 (Advanced Theological Prolegomena) in the first semester after matriculation. Required of all PhD/THS students.

ST 9890 Professional Development Practicum - 0-2 Hours

Participants design, conduct, and evaluate at least one professional development activity. Program participants may repeat the course multiple times, not to exceed a total of 2 hours over the course of the degree program. These integrative and generative activities could take the form of teaching, consulting, developing curriculum, coaching, pastoral ministries, grant writing, etc. Participants may propose non-Trinity or Trinity-related activities and opportunities. Each student is responsible to initiate conversations toward PDP planning with their program director prior to the semester in which the practicum will be conducted. All activities must be conducted after program matriculation. One credit hour is equivalent to approximately 35-40 hours of invested practicum work. Credit/No Credit.

ST 9975 Comprehensive Exam Preparation - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the comprehensive examination. PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat the course twice for a total of three hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat it once. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in comprehensive exam preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ST 9990 Dissertation Proposal Prep - 0-3 Hours

An independent study facilitating student preparation for the dissertation proposal. Only PhD/EDS and PhD/ICS program participants may repeat this course twice for a total of 3 hours. PhD/THS program participants may repeat this course once for a total of 3 hours. Only PhD/THS program participants in the Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History, Archaeology, and Languages Focus or with an EDS or ICS minor may take it for zero credit hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested in dissertation proposal preparation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ST 9991 Dissertation Research - 1-4 Hours

Courses taken for dissertation writing that embodies the results of original research and makes a genuine contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. PhD students are eligible to register for Dissertation Research after the official acceptance of the proposal, and may register for two to six semesters totaling 6 hours. Counts as full-time student status when enrolled for 3 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of thirty-five hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Counts as half-time student status when enrolled for 2 hours or when registrant affirms that a minimum of fifteen hours per week are invested on the dissertation and the requisite form has been completed at the time of registration in the Academic Doctoral Office. Credit / No Credit.

ST 9992 Dissertation Extension - 0 Hours

One or more dissertation extension courses for the writing of the dissertation. Registrants for this course will be assessed a continuation fee. Less than half-time student status. No Credit.

TR 099A Acadeum Online Consortium - 1-4 Hours

This is a nonacademic "placeholder" course for Acadeum online consortium courses, which provides temporary credit hours on a student's schedule until the appropriate approval is granted by the Dean's office and the registrar completes the process with the Acadeum consortium. Students should register for the TR 099 designation and the section that reflects the selected number of credit hours. Students need to access the online form, available on My.TIU.edu, and complete the it with the assistance of the faculty advisor. The completed course contract must be returned to the Dean's office. The contract will be forwarded to the Records Office, which will create a section of the student's approved course, register the student into the college catalog course, and cancel the temporary registration. The student should then review the student schedule in the online registration program to verify accurate registration for the appropriate course.

TR 099C Temporary Registration Special Programs: Off Campus - 12-17 Hours

This is a nonacademic "placeholder" course for off campus study programs, which provides temporary credit hours on a student's schedule until the appropriate college catalog course is approved by the Dean's office. Students should register for the TR 099 designation and the section that reflects the selected number of credit hours. Students need to obtain an appropriate course contract online or from the Dean's office and complete the form with the assistance of the faculty member who is overseeing the course. The completed course contract must be returned to the Dean's office. The contract will be forwarded to the Records Office, which will create a section of the student's approved course, register the student into the college catalog course, and cancel the temporary registration. The student should then review the student schedule in the online registration program to verify accurate registration for the appropriate course.

TR 099G Temporary Registration Guided Study - 1-4 Hours

This is a nonacademic "placeholder" course for guided study, which provides temporary credit hours on a student's schedule until the appropriate college catalog course is approved by the Dean's office. Students should register for the TR 099 designation and the section that reflects the selected number of credit hours. Students need to obtain an appropriate course contract online or from the Dean's office and complete the form with the assistance of the faculty member who is overseeing the course. The completed course contract must be returned to the Dean's office. The contract will be forwarded to the Records Office, which will create a section of the student's approved course, register the student into the college catalog course, and cancel the temporary registration. The student should then review the student schedule in the online registration program to verify accurate registration for the appropriate course.

TR 099I Temporary Registration Independent Study - 1-4 Hours

This is a nonacademic "placeholder" course for independent study, which provides temporary credit hours on a student's schedule until the appropriate college catalog course is approved by the Dean's office. Students should register for the TR 099 designation and the section that reflects the selected number of credit hours. Students need to obtain an appropriate course contract online or from the Dean's office and complete the form with the assistance of the faculty member who is overseeing the course. The completed course contract must be returned to the Dean's office. The contract will be forwarded to the Records Office, which will create a section of the student's approved course, register the student into the college catalog course, and cancel the temporary registration. The student should then review the student schedule in the online registration program to verify accurate registration for the appropriate course.

TR 099T Temporary Registration Internship - 1-12 Hours

This is a nonacademic "placeholder" course for internships, which provides temporary credit hours on a student's schedule until the appropriate college catalog course is approved by the Dean's office. Students should register for the TR 099 designation and the section that reflects the selected number of credit hours. Students need to obtain an appropriate course contract online or from the Dean's office and complete the form with the assistance of the faculty member who is overseeing the course. The completed course contract must be returned to the Dean's office. The contract will be forwarded to the Records Office, which will create a section of the student's approved course, register the student into the college catalog course, and cancel the temporary registration. The student should then review the student schedule in the online registration program to verify accurate registration for the appropriate course.

WOR 111 Introduction to Worship Studies - 1 Hour

Orientation to majoring in Worship at Trinity, introducing the concept of music as a vocation (or calling) from God, forming initial thoughts on musical meaning and the role of music in the culture and in the church, developing a sense of music's role in Christian worship, and exposing students to helpful technologies. Computer laboratory fee. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

WOR 121 Introduction to Technology in Worship - 2 Hours

A basic orientation to hardware and software commonly used in the contemporary church including production with audio, graphics, lighting, and video. Copyright issues will be introduced. Computer laboratory fee. Offered spring semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

WOR 437X Music in Worship - 3 Hours

The study of biblical, theological, historical, and practical concepts and patterns for worship of all major Christian traditions. The types of music and the roles music has played in the worship of various historical traditions will be considered in light of the theology of those traditions. Includes the study of congregational song. Student projects will include planning, leading, and evaluating music in worship. Includes 12 hours of observation in a local church music ministry. Prerequisites: BI 105 and BI 115 or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester in even-numbered years. Cross-listed with BRS 437X. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

WOR 438 Worship Planning - 3 Hours

An examination of diverse currently available resource materials for congregational worship with an emphasis on planning, preparing, and leading effective services. Includes a 20-hour supervised practicum in worship planning for a local congregation. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

WOR 450 Internship - 3 Hours

Internship in a local church music/worship program to be coordinated with the worship pastor/music director and a faculty supervisor from the Music Department. Fulfills one service learning credit (IDS 106). Prerequisites: WOR 437X, WOR 438, and consent of the Chair of the Music Department. Offered on demand for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.

WOR 499 Senior Seminar in Worship Studies - 1 Hour

Capstone course for Worship majors. Revisits topics introduced in WOR 111 (e.g. vocation, philosophy, music in worship), and furthers each student's preparation for professional leadership in the local church (and/or graduate study) through an individually-designed sequence of specialized readings and discussions. The course fulfills the IDS 499X Integrative Thought Capstone requirement for students in the Worship major. Offered fall semester for Deerfield traditional undergraduate. Delivery mode: Deerfield traditional undergraduate.